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Author Topic: International Student,how to practise law.  (Read 733 times)

steeevo93

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International Student,how to practise law.
« on: January 10, 2011, 03:51:19 PM »
Hello, I'm a graduate looking to study law and eventually practie law in the USA.
I earned a 3 year B.A in "political scinece&socialogical studies" and "legal studies" (only two subjects), from National University of Ireland Galway (NUIG) the university where martin sheen went for a semester. And as I took legal studies as part of my degree i was admited to a one year LLB program.

So, i have a 3 year B.A, in politics&socioligical studies and legal studies. I have an LLB, I have been vice president in the law society of the university, and have written for the law review and the college newspaper.

So, do I meet the basic requirments to practise law in the USA?
& if so would I be able to apply to a top 20 law school in order to take postgraduate study(LLM because I dont have a JD)?

Go raibh mile maith agat (A thousand thank yous)
.....

john4040

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Re: International Student,how to practise law.
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2011, 04:32:59 PM »
Hello, I'm a graduate looking to study law and eventually practie law in the USA.
I earned a 3 year B.A in "political scinece&socialogical studies" and "legal studies" (only two subjects), from National University of Ireland Galway (NUIG) the university where martin sheen went for a semester. And as I took legal studies as part of my degree i was admited to a one year LLB program.

So, i have a 3 year B.A, in politics&socioligical studies and legal studies. I have an LLB, I have been vice president in the law society of the university, and have written for the law review and the college newspaper.

So, do I meet the basic requirments to practise law in the USA?
& if so would I be able to apply to a top 20 law school in order to take postgraduate study(LLM because I dont have a JD)?

Go raibh mile maith agat (A thousand thank yous)
.....

1. Apply to US LLM program
2. Get LLM
3. Pass bar exam
4. Profit

steeevo93

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Re: International Student,how to practise law.
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2011, 05:21:00 PM »
[quote1. Apply to US LLM program
2. Get LLM
3. Pass bar exam
4. Profit][/quote]    ;D ;)
Nice and simple .
So is it a myth that you need to have a jd in order to practise law in the US? or will I have to take a US LLM in orfer to practise?

john4040

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Re: International Student,how to practise law.
« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2011, 05:49:00 PM »
  ;D ;)
Nice and simple .
So is it a myth that you need to have a jd in order to practise law in the US? or will I have to take a US LLM in orfer to practise?

It's not that simple, I was just kidding with you.  It depends on which state you want to practice.  Currently, many states allow foreign LLMs to sit for the bar.

An LL.M. degree from an ABA-approved law school qualifies a foreign legal graduate to take the bar exam in Alabama, California, New Hampshire, New York and Virginia, as well as in the independent republic of Palau. In addition, legal practice in the home jurisdiction plus a certain amount of coursework at an accredited law school qualifies a foreign legal graduate to take the bar exam in Alaska, the District of Columbia, Massachusetts, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Texas, Utah and West Virginia. However, a number of states, including Arizona, Florida, Georgia, New Jersey and North Carolina only recognize JD degrees from accredited law schools as qualification to take the bar.

New York allows foreign lawyers from civil law countries to sit for the New York bar exam once they have completed a minimum of 20 credit hours (usually but not necessarily in an LL.M. program) at an ABA-approved law school involving at least two basic subjects tested on the New York bar exam. Lawyers from common-law countries face more lenient restrictions and do not typically need to study at an ABA-approved law school. Foreign lawyers from both civil law and common law jurisdictions, however, are required to demonstrate that they have successfully completed a course of law studies of at least three years that would fulfill the educational requirements to bar admission in their home country.


**Edit:**  Check page 30 here:  http://www.ncbex.org/fileadmin/mediafiles/downloads/Comp_Guide/CompGuide_2010.pdf

According to pg. 10 of that document, you will not be allowed to sit for the Bar in the following states unless you first get a JD:
Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, New Jersey, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Wyoming