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Author Topic: Fustrated, confused and I have questions  (Read 890 times)

havoc61187

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Fustrated, confused and I have questions
« on: January 07, 2011, 04:45:18 AM »
Hey all,

I just finished my last semester of undergrad at NYU, and I am a bit dissapointed with my preformance. I transfered from Nassau Community College with a 3.45 GPA, I graduated NYU's school of education with a 3.195 GPA (it game up from a 2.6). My first question is that will the law school that I want to go to compute a new GPA based on my community college GPA and NYU's GPA? My second question is that, does the name of my school make up for an avarage GPA? My third question is that do you think I can get into  Hofstra Law School, UCLA or even ST Johns with this GPA? My last question is does the fact that I am an education major help me stand out?


Thank You for your help
 :)

Thane Messinger

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Re: Fustrated, confused and I have questions
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2011, 04:09:20 PM »
I just finished my last semester of undergrad at NYU, and I am a bit dissapointed with my preformance. I transfered from Nassau Community College with a 3.45 GPA, I graduated NYU's school of education with a 3.195 GPA (it game up from a 2.6). My first question is that will the law school that I want to go to compute a new GPA based on my community college GPA and NYU's GPA? My second question is that, does the name of my school make up for an avarage GPA? My third question is that do you think I can get into  Hofstra Law School, UCLA or even ST Johns with this GPA? My last question is does the fact that I am an education major help me stand out?


Havoc -

I'm reviewing a manuscript by a veteran law professor who addresses this topic.  He served on admissions committees, and offers a number of critical points.

First, it's quite right that there is not a requisite program.  At the margins, however, committees do look at specific degrees . . . but that doesn't nearly capture it.  They look at courses and even instructors.  Among the things they're looking for is how an academic workload was handled.  Thus, one element in your application should be in addressing this point.  If, for example, you held a job during your undergraduate years, that is important. 

An additional question:  Does any other subject appeal to you?  If, for example, you like math or economics or IT, adding a second major (usually an additional semester) and doing very well in those courses goes a LONG way, with a strong LSAT, to convincing a committee that you have the dedication and energy that will be needed in the law.  (Moreover, these are good additions to an education and career.  Really.)

Also, "at the margins" is a key phrase:  your LSAT is a large part of the degree to which the GPA and other factors will be an issue.  Where the above analysis is crucial is where an applicant is not clearly stellar--which is most applicants at all but safety schools.

So, THE key to your application, assuming an additional semester is not the immediate thought, is to absolutely nail the LSAT.  Study for that harder than you studied for an entire semester.  Good luck!