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Author Topic: Music Major with 3.7GPA looking for a Law school  (Read 2385 times)

thenirvanazep

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Music Major with 3.7GPA looking for a Law school
« on: December 29, 2010, 12:49:49 AM »
Hello,

I'll be graduating with a Bachelors of Music Degree in the History of Music/Classical Guitar Performance with a 3.7 GPA. I'm taking the LSAT soon and my practice tests put me (hopefully!) at 160-165.

I'm looking for a law school that would be able to admit me with a full ride scholarship, (tier whatever) any suggestions?

Hamilton

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Re: Music Major with 3.7GPA looking for a Law school
« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2010, 07:47:49 AM »
Here, I'll go at it again.  WHY do you want to go to law school?  You majored in music, so it's obviously not your life-long dream.

SaraJean

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Re: Music Major with 3.7GPA looking for a Law school
« Reply #2 on: December 29, 2010, 09:42:59 AM »
Perhaps the OP is interested in entertainment law, in which case a music degree would be very relevant.   Or, perhaps, partway through the degree, the OP realized that a performance/history degree is very unlikely to put food on one's table, but since law schools tend to value a high GPA over a particular major, the OP decided to finish the degree.  (That's what I did, but I went into a different career.  Right now, I'm pursuing a law degree because I need an additional graduate degree to advance in my current career and I've always found law interesting.)

To the OP:  Try checking the Official Guide to ABA Approved Law Schools http://officialguide.lsac.org/release/OfficialGuide_Default.aspx on the LSAC site.  Search by UGPA/LSAT and find schools where your numbers are well above average.  Then, go to Law School Numbers http://www.lawschoolnumbers.com/ and see what type of financial aid those schools have been offering.

nealric

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Re: Music Major with 3.7GPA looking for a Law school
« Reply #3 on: December 29, 2010, 03:37:32 PM »
We can't give any specific advice without an LSAT score. It's far and away the biggest determinant of your ability to get into law school and your ability to get scholarships. Even a few points plus or minus can make a big difference. A 165 is a completely different ballgame from a 160.

 It would also help to know what your ambitions are and where you want to live.
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thenirvanazep

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Re: Music Major with 3.7GPA looking for a Law school
« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2010, 03:50:03 PM »
Is Law school anyone's life long dream? If you went to a law school and asked any 1L if they wanted to go to law school when they were 10 years old, what do you think they would say?

And I think Music prepares your for law school more than any other undergraduate major. Learning Music Theory ( a new language like  the one you'll learn in law school), analyzing complex pieces of Classical Music for every chord and progression and then learning why that particular piece of music was important (case briefing), the research, practice, and finally high stress performance of ever challenging material while trying to convince the audience that your interpretation is perfect and flawless (ring any bells?)

and think of YOUR undergraduate years. Were you doing 6 hours of homework excluding time in class and doing class assignments, 6 days a week (5 hours of practicing, 1-2 hours of piano and ear training practice) That's expected of a music major every week for all of their four-five years and these above times are not unusual or uncommon.

I am by no means trying to brag about my UG years or trying to sell myself as hard core. I'm just arguing that a music major prepares you for the stresses, expectations, and pure work of law school. So even if I majored in music, it does not mean that doing music as a sole source of income is my dream. I'd really like to go into family law to be honest.

and I'm from the Northwest and like to stay on the West coast or in the Midwest.

nealric

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Re: Music Major with 3.7GPA looking for a Law school
« Reply #5 on: December 29, 2010, 03:56:46 PM »
Quote
I'd really like to go into family law to be honest.

and I'm from the Northwest and like to stay on the West coast or in the Midwest.

If you want to do family law, then school ranking won't be terribly important for you. I would look for a school in a city you would like to live in that offers you a good scholarship WITHOUT conditions. Beware of schools offering scholarships conditional on keeping a 3.0 GPA. It sounds easy, but when the curve is a 2.5 it may actually be quite difficult.
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Hamilton

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Re: Music Major with 3.7GPA looking for a Law school
« Reply #6 on: December 31, 2010, 12:50:17 AM »
I am not trying to be combative, just challenging you to challenge yourself.  You have not explained WHY you want to go to law school.  Going for the wrong reasons can be a BIG mistake.

If law is your love or passion, then by all means look into it.  But if it just seems like the thing to do for lack of any other objective or career options... boy... you need to think real hard about it.

Is Law school anyone's life long dream? If you went to a law school and asked any 1L if they wanted to go to law school when they were 10 years old, what do you think they would say?
...
and think of YOUR undergraduate years. Were you doing 6 hours of homework excluding time in class and doing class assignments, 6 days a week (5 hours of practicing, 1-2 hours of piano and ear training practice) That's expected of a music major every week for all of their four-five years and these above times are not unusual or uncommon.