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Author Topic: 2.7 undergrad GPA 3.4 MS and 3.7 PhD LSAT 142  (Read 6831 times)

rbutcher2178

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2.7 undergrad GPA 3.4 MS and 3.7 PhD LSAT 142
« on: December 20, 2010, 03:30:53 PM »
From what I understand, the only GPA that is relevant to law school is the undergrad GPA. My LSAT score is terrible, as it turns out, it is really hard to write a PhD dissertation while craming for the LSAT right before the exam. :'(  I have applied to Suffolk, New England Law, Lewis & Clark, and Seattle U. I will be retaking the LSAT in February, and I have already submitted my applications with the terrible LSAT score with an explanation in the personal statement. I have a feeling I will be turned down by all of the schools above since they go off the undergrad GPA and LSAT score, unless they wait for the February score and it increases to < 150.

louiebstef

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Re: 2.7 undergrad GPA 3.4 MS and 3.7 PhD LSAT 142
« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2010, 04:00:05 PM »

Unfortunately, I pretty much agree with you.  Until you can at least post an LSAT over 150, that 142 along with the 2.7 GPA is going to kill you.  I recommend taking an LSAT prep course.  If you can boost your score into the middle 150s, you'd stand a much better chance of gaining admission. 
"Why be a lawyer? I'm already an ass.  Might as well go professional!"

interrex

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Re: 2.7 undergrad GPA 3.4 MS and 3.7 PhD LSAT 142
« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2010, 06:24:17 PM »
Am I reading this right, you have a phd and still want to go to lawschool? What was your PHD in and why can't you use that as a career?

JDGuy86

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Re: 2.7 undergrad GPA 3.4 MS and 3.7 PhD LSAT 142
« Reply #3 on: December 20, 2010, 10:24:16 PM »
yeah, even I'd strongly suggest going with the PhD career path it couldn't be that bad!

rbutcher2178

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Re: 2.7 undergrad GPA 3.4 MS and 3.7 PhD LSAT 142
« Reply #4 on: December 21, 2010, 08:09:52 AM »
PhD is in inorganic chemistry, and I was involved in basic research, which is not marketable outside of academics. The outlook for chemists is actually slower than average for all occupations. Also, I graduated in May of 08, take a look at the events that took place in the stock market following May of 08. If the first five years of your career are the most important, I am screwed. Also, I cant get a postdoc since it has been 2.5 years since I graduated.

I am confident I can get < 150 next time around, this time around I will actually prepare for the LSAT.

A previous graduate from my lab now works as a patent attorney and is doing very well for himself. I was undecided if I wanted to go that path, although now that I am working a job that has little to do with my major, I think it is time to change directions. As a patent attorney, I will be able to get involved with important issues related to science and technology. According to the IP attorney I know, a PhD in chemistry with a JD are very marketable credentials to have. He mentioned that he gets headhunters calling him on a daily basis.

Hamilton

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Re: 2.7 undergrad GPA 3.4 MS and 3.7 PhD LSAT 142
« Reply #5 on: December 21, 2010, 08:48:26 AM »
I suggest working with some career planning folks and using the organic chem degree.  I question the "marketability" of a Ph.D. and a JD as I was in a similar situation with a MS and 15+ years technical experience - zilch.  You have a Ph.D. in organic chem - you could actually benefit humanity applying that degree.

Piling up degrees is not the path to success.

interrex

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Re: 2.7 undergrad GPA 3.4 MS and 3.7 PhD LSAT 142
« Reply #6 on: December 21, 2010, 09:52:17 AM »
Nothing wrong with getting the JD, BUT you express an interest in IP, interesting thing is that lawschool does NOT repeat NOT allow you get licensed to practice in patent law, it just dosn't.

BUT, ironicly even a BA in a science field without a single day in lawschool DOES qualify you to take the patent bar, you'd just have to call yourself a "Patent Agent" without the JD. Those called "Patent Attorneys" have both degrees but do the exact same job for their clients. I'd start with the degree you have and be an agent in IP, if you like it then you could stop right there. If you did that and then wanted to other areas of law you can always get the JD latter too. Have you considered being a patent agent during the week and a part time lawstudent on weekends?

rbutcher2178

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Re: 2.7 undergrad GPA 3.4 MS and 3.7 PhD LSAT 142
« Reply #7 on: December 21, 2010, 09:59:58 AM »
Thank you for the comments, now I know what others think regarding my situation.

Hamilton, if I understand you correctly, you have a MS in organic chem and a JD and are unable to find a job as a IP attorney? I would argue that now is not the best time to be looking for a career. Wait until the baby-boomers start retiring, which is already starting to happen. Now would be a great time for me to start a four year program, since in four years the economy should be back to where it was pre-Leman Brothers collapse.

Mandamus, that is actually a great idea. Any suggestions for passing the bar without going to law school? Perhaps I could start at a law firm as a patent agent and attend evening classes to become a attorney. I dont know of any law schools that have weekend classes?

interrex

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Re: 2.7 undergrad GPA 3.4 MS and 3.7 PhD LSAT 142
« Reply #8 on: December 21, 2010, 11:17:02 AM »
You could do that, just don't call it a "law" firm unless you have at least one guy with a JD in there "Agent" (its a silly name game but they like to enforce it) as for prepping for it, they offer prep courses I believe Kaplan and  Barbri have some but if not others do for sure.

As for weekend classes, you can go as slow as one day a week(saturday or sunday) and be done in 5 years(or faster if you wish) at  http://www.cooley.edu/academics/    People will talkshit but you'd be doing a lawyers job each day while attending.

If you have enough Accounting electives you could sit the CPA exam too before getting the full JD which would let you do some(albeit not everything) in taxcourt also.

http://search.yahoo.com/search;_ylt=Al5TBNmEq4Q94Z47uSHR2RmbvZx4?p=patent+bar+prep&toggle=1&cop=mss&ei=UTF-8&fr=yfp-t-701-1

Here is a list of patent bar preps that may help also. Let me know if it does.

john4040

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Re: 2.7 undergrad GPA 3.4 MS and 3.7 PhD LSAT 142
« Reply #9 on: December 21, 2010, 02:03:50 PM »
In my opinion, Mandamus is spot on (except for the suggestion that you go get a CPA - I think that's taking things a bit too far in a direction that you probably don't want to go). 

(1) Become a patent agent and see if you like patent prosecution before going to law school.  This is an incredibly rare opportunity: You will be allowed to experience much of the same work you will be doing in a law firm - except, you won't have to shell out $150,000 in tuition / expenses to "test the waters."

(2) DO NOT call your firm a "law firm."  In the United States, the general rule is that lawyers are prohibited from entering into business with non-lawyers for the purposes of practicing law or from sharing legal fees with non-lawyers. The rationale given for the prohibition is that it will interfere with the independence of the lawyer’s professional judgment.

Currently, the only exception to that general rule in the U.S. is the District of Columbia where non-lawyers are permitted to be partners in law firms.

So, until you pass that bar exam (unless you're practicing in D.C.), I would put this idea on the backburner.

By the way, for your sake, I hope you meant > 150 :
I am confident I can get < 150 next time around, this time around I will actually prepare for the LSAT.