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Author Topic: The "most effective" logic game strategies?  (Read 1873 times)

cvargas84

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The "most effective" logic game strategies?
« on: December 10, 2010, 01:32:40 PM »
I attempted to begin my LSAT training last week (taking LSAT in June), only to be completely stuck on the first question. I didn't even know where to begin!! This leads me to believe that my weak area is definitely the logic games portion. I have done exercises on the other areas, and while I need to practice (I'm just beginning- and plan on giving this test my ALL) it wasn't nearly as challenging as the logic games part. I found myself staring at the problem, scribbling notes and symbols, only to get the question wrong. I will either take a course or hire a tutor, but I'd like to begin my self-prep as soon as possible, and work on my own. I don't want to wait until the course or the tutor.

Is there an effective (but easy, think Logic for Dummies) way to learn the "tricks" of each logic question type? I've read online that there are only a few types. I started reading the McGraw Hill Logic Games book and the explanation is... (how do I put this) more confusing than the LSAT questions themselves.

Any suggestions?

marcus-aurelius

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Re: The "most effective" logic game strategies?
« Reply #1 on: December 10, 2010, 02:17:54 PM »
I have friends who swear by the Powerscore logic games bible.  I took a Kaplan course so I cannot vouch for the book personally.  But both my friends who used the book did relatively well on the LSAT.


cvargas84

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Re: The "most effective" logic game strategies?
« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2010, 02:50:42 PM »
ok, I'll get the PS bibles and see how it goes.

thank you!

LSAT Freedom

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Re: The "most effective" logic game strategies?
« Reply #3 on: December 21, 2010, 12:08:41 PM »
There really aren't any "tricks" to Logic Games (nor are there tricks to any LSAT questions).  The Logic Games, and the LSAT as a whole, tests logical principles.  The more you know and understand those principles, the more likely you will do well on the exam. 

As for Logic Games, specifically, here are two tips that should help you:

1) The most critical thing you need to do is diagram the rules provided and then use those diagrams to map out the different scenarios in the questions and answers.  Proceeding through these games visually is the best and most effective way to do well on this section.

2) It's not what you know (or what's provided), but WHAT YOU CAN FIND OUT.  By this, I mean that you can often take some of the rules provided (S comes before N) (N comes before G) and combine them (i.e., S comes before G) to reach new rules.  The more effectively you can do that when you initially diagram the game, the quicker you'll be able to answer the questions.  If that's a "trick," then so be it.  But it's really contingent on your ability to use deductive reasoning. 



Hope that helps.

interrex

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Re: The "most effective" logic game strategies?
« Reply #4 on: December 21, 2010, 12:17:12 PM »
You sure are trying to push your salesitem all over this board aren't you?

There really aren't any "tricks" to Logic Games (nor are there tricks to any LSAT questions).  The Logic Games, and the LSAT as a whole, tests logical principles.  The more you know and understand those principles, the more likely you will do well on the exam. 

As for Logic Games, specifically, here are two tips that should help you:

1) The most critical thing you need to do is diagram the rules provided and then use those diagrams to map out the different scenarios in the questions and answers.  Proceeding through these games visually is the best and most effective way to do well on this section.

2) It's not what you know (or what's provided), but WHAT YOU CAN FIND OUT.  By this, I mean that you can often take some of the rules provided (S comes before N) (N comes before G) and combine them (i.e., S comes before G) to reach new rules.  The more effectively you can do that when you initially diagram the game, the quicker you'll be able to answer the questions.  If that's a "trick," then so be it.  But it's really contingent on your ability to use deductive reasoning. 



Hope that helps.