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Author Topic: How is "minority" defined and how does it work to our advantage?  (Read 1740 times)

cvargas84

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How is "minority" defined and how does it work to our advantage?
« on: December 10, 2010, 01:22:57 PM »
While reading a few law school application books, I was surprised to learn that being a minority might benefit a law school applicant. Is this so, and what exactly makes one a minority?

I was born and raised in Chile (South America), but have had American citizenship since being naturalized at birth by my American mother. I did not move the US until 8 years ago, and I hold both nationalities/passports, even though neither country acknowledges the other. (I'm American in the US, I'm Chilean in Chile).


MEMEMEME

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Re: How is "minority" defined and how does it work to our advantage?
« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2010, 08:25:22 PM »
You would probably be considered "Other Hispanic" or "South American" Hispanic or your application. How it works is you are considered an under represented minority in the legal field. They want to even the playing field, which is why you would get an advantage. I would definitely list yourself as Hispanic on any application (you can choose not to select an race/ethnicity) because it will help you. I would also talk about it in a Diversity Statement because law schools like having a rich and culturally diverse student body.

cvargas84

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Re: How is "minority" defined and how does it work to our advantage?
« Reply #2 on: December 16, 2010, 09:12:27 PM »
Thanks! I had to select "South American" on LSAC- the other options were specific (Mexican, Puerto Rican, etc..) and didn't apply to me, so I guess South American and Hispanic should be the same thing...

interrex

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Re: How is "minority" defined and how does it work to our advantage?
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2010, 01:19:09 AM »
Its just politics(as is life) Lawyers tend to be white men with rich white male fathers. They try to mix that up with adding lower income, women, minorities, excons, whatever they can to spice it up. The govt gives grants based on that and the public ones in some states have quotas that are mandatory to meet. If you need a hispanic woman and the only one who applied is a 2.0 from community college with a 142 lsat, she's in.
Take the advantage, but you asked and thats why it is what it is, for better or worse I guess.