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Author Topic: Why the job market is changing  (Read 1852 times)

nealric

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Re: Why the job market is changing
« Reply #10 on: October 28, 2010, 12:45:38 PM »
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It seems that if you have respectable grades and an IP background from even a CBA school you would have a better shot at an IP job than someone with solid grades from Hastings or another tier 1/2 school and with a Political Science Degree. It certainly helps to have a specialized knowledge when going into the job market. A J.D. and grades are not always enough to set you apart. There are plenty of people with a J.D. and good grades, but not that many with those qualities and a computer science degree.

IP is a bit of a special case. The Hastings grad with a Polisci degree wouldn't be allowed to sit for the patent bar- they wouldn't even have the basic qualifications for a patent prosecution job.
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bigs5068

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Re: Why the job market is changing
« Reply #11 on: October 28, 2010, 01:49:52 PM »
Some IP firms do not require a engineering background, but strongly desire it. It makes sense and if you want to work at the Chinese Embassy fluency in Mandarin would be a lot more useful to them than good grades and a prestigious degree. The list could go on of specialized jobs where some specialized knowledge would be far more useful than your class rank or school's prestige. There are a lot of lawyers out there and it certainly is in your best interest to get good grades and go to a top school, but a lot of jobs would care much more about you having a detailed understanding of a particular subject rather than academic honors.

nealric

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Re: Why the job market is changing
« Reply #12 on: October 28, 2010, 01:59:38 PM »
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Some IP firms do not require a engineering background, but strongly desire it.

Then they are doing IP lit or soft IP. Patent prosecution requires it- full stop.
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IPFreely

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Re: Why the job market is changing
« Reply #13 on: November 01, 2010, 03:54:19 PM »
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Some IP firms do not require a engineering background, but strongly desire it.

Then they are doing IP lit or soft IP. Patent prosecution requires it- full stop.
Correct.  This is not a shades-of-gray issue.  A technical background an absolute requirement to take the USPTO registration examination.

That said, there are three ways to qualify: (1) ABET-accredited engineering or science BA/BS degree; (2) sufficient engineering/science coursework (28 to 32 credits, depending on subject) to get such a degree (usually used for CS programs since ABET was not in the business of accrediting them until relatively recently, but can be used if someone took a bunch of chemistry and then switched majors to art history); (3) FE (Fundamentals of Engineering) exam, which has its own engineering coursework requirements.

I disagree with Bigs' assertion that anyone with a CS degree is golden.  IP firms still aren't hiring at anywhere near the pace they used to;  the slowdown in R&D means correspondingly fewer patent applications.

bigs5068

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Re: Why the job market is changing
« Reply #14 on: November 01, 2010, 04:01:34 PM »
In the bay area there are just a few tech companies maybe you have heard of them google, apple, facebook, and a lot of other less well known companied founded by Peter Thiel that are growing exponentially despite the recession. I am not sure about the rest of the country and I have no idea what their patent process is like.  I am just speaking with limited knowledge about the location that I live in and the IP & technology field is alive & well in the Bay Area. Still nothing is guaranteed, but if you have one of the degrees you listed above, a J.D., and live in the Bay Area it probably will not be to difficult to find a job. Of course nothing is guaranteed, but I would bet on someone with those qualifications doing alright in the Bay.