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Author Topic: seeking advice  (Read 1475 times)

IPFreely

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Re: seeking advice
« Reply #10 on: October 26, 2010, 11:53:54 AM »
This is a problem that should not be ignored.

I doubt I'd make enough to pay both mortgages but I really don't want to let money deter me from pursuing my goal.
Don't be silly.  He's smart and unique.  He'll get a full tuition scholarship, they'll even pay him a stipend for gracing their hallways.  The bank will forgive his mortgage, maybe even chip in for the water bill.  He won't be one of those losers with no job and $150,000 in law school debt dragging him down like concrete overshoes on a Mafia tattletale.

Seriously, do you know what your LSAT is yet, and how generous your target school is with scholarships?

Thane Messinger

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Re: seeking advice
« Reply #11 on: October 26, 2010, 07:47:29 PM »
I've been employed here for 5 years but I still view what I do as a job because even though I've been promoted I don't want to stay here for the remainder of my working life or in the insurance field.
I doubt I'd make enough to pay both mortgages but I really don't want to let money deter me from pursuing my goal.
I've put off school for a long time because I always thought it wasn't the right time for me to go. Now I know that there isn't a right time. Maybe a better time but not a right time. However I want to go now because I've waited long enough. If I wait any longer I probably won't do it.


These are good sentiments--and exactly so as to "right" v. "better"--but they point in the opposite direction.  While the answer might have been different in 2006, this year it is almost certainly better to wait a year or two, given the market and also your current earning and savings potential.  The market will take some time to absorb a pent-up supply, much less catch up to a healthy equilibrium, and while that's not determinative neither should it be dismissed. 

If it's important enough to you and you set a goal for admission in year 201x, and plan like the dickens for a stellar LSAT and careful preparation, that is time well spent.  A dream deferred need not be a dream denied; it can be all the better with the right approach.

If you do decide to go ahead, here's to avoiding naysayers.   = :   )   Seriously.  Sometimes it is good to follow one's gut, and that is one of the markers for a good decision.  If so, your LSAT and preparation will be even more important.