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Author Topic: American Heritage University College of Law  (Read 11153 times)

jonlevy

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Re: American Heritage University College of Law
« Reply #20 on: August 08, 2013, 09:29:02 AM »
0% pass rate in five years says it all - try a DL Law School that actually graduates lawyers like Taft or Concord which also have some recognition for their JDs by other academic institutions should Plan A fail.

On the plus side, AHU has unlimited upside potential.

cobes1996

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Re: American Heritage University College of Law
« Reply #21 on: August 08, 2013, 09:39:39 AM »
I understand the limitations of a DL school.  In my situation, I have been negotiating contracts for several years and work in an environment where everyone that performs my job is an attorney, making me the only one who isn't.  Now, you could spin this is as a good thing, but it is my opinion, my credibility with my peers is low since people view me as a "non-attorney who doesn't know the law."  I am looking to attend a DL to gain that education. I am not interested in practicing law and beening licensed in CA would not affect my job status or abilities.  Also, I live in KY and there is only three brick and mortar schools.  Only one is close and doesn't have a part-time or evening program.  So for me, its about logistics.

I do believe Concord is the better choice among DL schools. Does anybody have any idea about the cost for tuition at Concord?


DeltaBravoKS

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Re: American Heritage University College of Law
« Reply #22 on: August 08, 2013, 04:19:42 PM »
Concord is the most expensive--their tuition is available online (in fact, I'm not aware of any CA DL JD school that does not post tuition).

Taft is more reasonable and is (also) DETC accredited which should mean it is a nationally recognized degree (not for Bar purposes, but as an education degree).  It also has federal financial aid possibilities like most "real" colleges.  Many employers that reimburse require "accredited" degrees, which DETC should meet that purpose.

NWCU is probably the oldest and arguably most successful at producing lawyers over the years.  It is not DETC accredited, but offers the cheapest tuition for a school that continually produces lawyers.

Oak Brooke probably has the highest FYLSX and GBX pass rates and very reasonable tuition, if you can maintain the moral standards.

Good luck.  Please keep us posted as to what you decide.  Someday I may make the same decision you do!

jonlevy

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Re: American Heritage University College of Law
« Reply #23 on: August 09, 2013, 08:51:43 AM »
I understand the limitations of a DL school.  In my situation, I have been negotiating contracts for several years and work in an environment where everyone that performs my job is an attorney, making me the only one who isn't.  Now, you could spin this is as a good thing, but it is my opinion, my credibility with my peers is low since people view me as a "non-attorney who doesn't know the law."  I am looking to attend a DL to gain that education. I am not interested in practicing law and beening licensed in CA would not affect my job status or abilities.  Also, I live in KY and there is only three brick and mortar schools.  Only one is close and doesn't have a part-time or evening program.  So for me, its about logistics.

Here is some good advice, I am an attorney, graduated from Taft and instruct at online schools in addition to practicing law.  Under no condition enter a JD program  without intending to become an attorney. far from being respected by your peers,  professionals like attorneys will peg you a pretentious wannabe attorney with an online degree.  By all means go to a California DL school but to continue past year one, you need to pass the baby bar, and after that ordeal which only has a 20% pass rate or so, it makes no sense not to continue to the California bar.  The non bar JD programs in my opinion are a total waste of money as they almost always unaccredited and again will simply raise red flags in the long run..

If you want a professional fully accredited degree w/out becoming an attorney it is called a MA or MS in Legal Studies and can be obtained online from regionally accredited schools like Kaplan.

cobes1996

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Re: American Heritage University College of Law
« Reply #24 on: August 09, 2013, 03:29:10 PM »
JonLevy - Thank you for that advice.  I have every intent to become an attorney. In fact, just a JD wouldn't "get me much" in my current job.   I would say that I don't have plan to "practice law" by joining a firm or hanging my shingle, but I would like the fall back in case something were to happen with my current career. 

I would agree with you that most attorney's would snub their noses at another attorney who attended an on-line school, but the attitude with my attorney peers at my current employer is that, if you can pass the bar, then you are good in my eyes. Yes, I understand the that an on-line degree doesn't provide much respect, but it is better than what I have now.  I would say that if I only attended the JD program at a DL school and did not take the bar, the degree would provide me no additional clout, but I would plan on taking the CA bar and then apply/petition to take the bar in my home state.

I have learned life is about situations.  I have a bachelor's and two master degrees from esteemed schools.  If I could do over again, I might have chosen to attend a brick and mortar law school.  Right now, I have to take the options that are in front of me.  I am not quitting my job (can't afford to) and there are no ABA programs close to me.  DL degree is about the only choice I have. 

Thanks everyone

 

Maintain FL 350

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Re: American Heritage University College of Law
« Reply #25 on: August 09, 2013, 04:32:08 PM »
I understand where you're coming from. For many people, a DL degree is the only option. Some employers will be suspicious, and others won't really care. As I said before, a DL law school can be the right choice for the right kind of student.

I would strongly encourage you to research whether your state has ever admitted a DL/non-ABA/non-state bar accredited grad. For example, KY may admit grads of the TN state bar-accredited schools next door (Nashville, Lincoln Memorial), but that doesn't mean they'll admit an unaccredited DL grad. Some DL schools hold DETC or some other form of accreditation, but that usually doesn't matter for the purposes of bar admission.

The point is, you don't want to spend $30,000-$40,000 on a JD and then have to take on the state bar to get admitted. Although your state may allow you to petition, that does not mean they're obligated to admit you. Some states are slowly warming up to the idea of DL, and others are flat out hostile. If your state does not admit unaccredited students, you need to understand the uphill battle you're facing, and decide whether or not it's worth the fight.

Again, before you drop tens of thousands of dollars on a DL degree contact your state bar. Get a clear picture of what they expect. They are the only source you should trust on this issue.   

jonlevy

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Re: American Heritage University College of Law
« Reply #26 on: August 09, 2013, 07:48:53 PM »
We have had a long thread on this - a California admitted DL school attorney can surely get admitted in only three other non federal jurisdictions by rights - DC after 5 years by motion, England & Wales upon satisfying the QLTS, and Ireland by passing the QLTT.  It may be possible in Iowa, New Mexico and a few others with special circumstances but I don't know of anyone who actually succeeded. If you have to resort to a petition, the odds are really against you. People here talk about petitioning a state Supreme Court like it is a routine deal; it surely is not and they don't know what they are talking about it unless they have tried it.  The few petitions by DL students that have succeeded are really one off affairs and likely can be counted on one hand.

Rocketdog2017

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Re: American Heritage University College of Law
« Reply #27 on: December 01, 2013, 09:57:28 AM »
I'm a 1L student at American Heritage School of Law. I've been studying law schools both ABA and Non-ABA accredited for some time now (like 10 years) and I can tell you what each have to offer. Online law schools are great for working people who have other commitments like full time jobs or kids (or both) ABA schools have a system in place to evaluate, and somewhat regulate, what is taught. FT schools don't allow people to work more than 20 hours a week because they want your main focus on the law, not everything else. Online schools are somewhat different. you take fewer classes so you have more time for work and family. There are different attributes to each system.

I choose AHUSOL because I made choices several years ago that afforded financial freedom from debt. I'm a California native and older (45) than the "typical" law school school student riddled with debt and somewhat unsure financial futures. AHU allows me the freedom to take exams when I have time, not at a scheduled time that would interfere with my current work obligations. While I'm not advocating ANY particular type of law school for everyone because everyone has different situations. If I needed law school to TEACH me to argue in court or how to do any particular task not offered in an online format, I'd have gone to an ABA school; however since I've worked in the transportation industry over 25 years, I've gained nearly three decades experience in a professional setting. In my particular situation I need a law LICENSE, therefore an online law school degree works perfect for me.

In case anyone might be thinking " but what about a job afterwards".......I have two business partners (one a licensed Attorney already) who is waiting for me to pass the bar in CA so we can open our own office.  I'm going to bring business experience and working capital, another person is going to bring 17 years of previous law practice experience and another person is bringing international exposure to the table. Combined we have a solid business plan that will serve a diverse client base.
American Heritage University School of Law 1L

jonlevy

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Re: American Heritage University College of Law
« Reply #28 on: December 02, 2013, 06:53:36 PM »
Rocketdog - you must be very brave - is it true not a single grad of AHLS has ever passed the Cal Bar?  Wouldn't that be indicative of some flaw in their instructional method or curriculum? What you need is a law school that will get you past the First Year Law Student Exam.  You might want to consider your odds and supplement the curriculum being offered.  best of luck!

Citylaw

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Re: American Heritage University College of Law
« Reply #29 on: December 03, 2013, 12:40:01 AM »
I wish you the best, but the Bar Exam will not be as flexible as American Heritage. You will have to take the Bar Exam in February or July and be ready to go.

It is interesting to hear these perspective on the online schools and I imagine it is the reason their pass rates are so much lower. It is not that the education is any worse, but at an ABA school you are forced to cram a massive amount of information for finals and they do not work around your schedule, which is stressful, but when you take the Bar Exam they cram everything into one three day test making law school finals seem like a joke.

I wish you the best on your legal education and future legal career.