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Author Topic: American Heritage University College of Law  (Read 12727 times)

passaroa25

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Re: American Heritage University College of Law
« Reply #10 on: October 20, 2010, 02:51:54 AM »
Check out the non traditional student's section of this discussion forum.  One member graduated from a part time program at 55 years old.  If you haven't maxed out the student loan limit (like I did), check out any part time law school program near you.  What about the University of Honolulu School of Law?   It is registered with the California Board of Examiners.  The California Southern School of Law is also registered with the Board of Examiners.  Once you pass the California bar and work in California for a specific number of  years,  you can take the bar exam in New Mexico and in the District of Columbia.
Angie

MichelleWilliams

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Re: American Heritage University College of Law
« Reply #11 on: April 19, 2011, 02:51:42 AM »
American Heritage University is a good school. Their faculty are very professional and supportive.

reformer

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Re: American Heritage University College of Law
« Reply #12 on: December 14, 2012, 04:27:24 PM »
Cal Bar policy for the admission Rule 4.25/Chap 3 seems to be real headache.
The Cal Bar itself  does not practice their own law on the Eligibility. It is perhaps to serve the special interest group who support teh evaluation. I have an MS from US and yet they are giving me hard time.

jonlevy

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Re: American Heritage University College of Law
« Reply #13 on: December 14, 2012, 07:52:40 PM »

Yes you can take the bar after 3 years perhaps in DC but if you wait five you can motion in.  On the other hand there is no guarantee or right to take the New Mexico Bar, that is at the pleasure of their bar examiners who interpret the rules strictly.  DC is the only sure jurisdiction that an online student can count on - the rest is pure speculation and at the whim of various bars who really do not like online students as members.  Just because one person has done it at some point does not mean everyone can.


Cher1300

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Re: American Heritage University College of Law
« Reply #14 on: December 20, 2012, 12:43:30 PM »
I have an A.S. Degree in Paralegal Studies, A Bachelors Degree in Business and a I just completed a Master's Degree in Law & Public Policy.  The only reason I am looking at online law schools is that I am 44 years old so a traditional school won't work.... there are not many law schools in Georgia anyway. 

Is it just your age that is preventing you from going to law school?  Because I'm 42 and just finished the first semester of my second year part time.  One of my study buddies is over 50 and was in the top 5 of our class.  Just want to be sure you are not underestimating your ability to do well in an ABA school.  I didn't do that well on my LSAT either, but had a higher gpa.  If you are within relative distance of an ABA, why not just go ahead and apply?  Many ABA's offer part-time evenings.  Although I'm not familiar with GA law schools, you really should look into GA bar requirements before doing on-line to be sure you can practice there if that is your plan.  Good luck!

jonlevy

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Re: American Heritage University College of Law
« Reply #15 on: December 20, 2012, 03:27:36 PM »
Cal Bar policy for the admission Rule 4.25/Chap 3 seems to be real headache.
The Cal Bar itself  does not practice their own law on the Eligibility. It is perhaps to serve the special interest group who support teh evaluation. I have an MS from US and yet they are giving me hard time.

Rule 4.25 General education
Before beginning the study of law, a general applicant must have completed at least two years of college work or demonstrated equivalent intellectual achievement, which must be certified by the law school the applicant is attending upon request by the Committee.
(A) “Two years of college work” means a minimum of sixty semester or ninety quarter units of college credit
(1) equivalent to at least half that required for a bachelor’s degree from a college or university that has degree-granting authority from the state in which it is located; and
(2) completed with a grade average adequate for graduation.

California does not even require an Associates degree, hard to see how one could not qualify. Even a three year foreign Bachelors degree would seem adequate with an evaluation certificate.

Rocketdog2017

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Re: American Heritage University College of Law
« Reply #16 on: April 07, 2013, 10:47:09 AM »
None of these online law schools have the proper credentials

I have a question....what are the "proper" credentials? Isn't the point of ANY law school to graduate, pass the bar exam and practice law? Once a person is an attorney it really isn't a matter of where he/she went to law school. When was the last time you asked your doctor where he/she went to medical school?...
did it change your mind on receiving medical care? 

I do agree with you regarding cost: go to the cheapest one. I will have zero debt when I graduate with my law degree.
American Heritage University School of Law 1L

jonlevy

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Re: American Heritage University College of Law
« Reply #17 on: April 07, 2013, 01:40:50 PM »
On line degrees are fine as long as you are understand that you need to first pass the California bar and the only other bar that will let you in without an act of God is  DC.

Your clients are not likely to care but opposing counsel and their clients sometimes try to make something of it.

You will also face outright hostility if you apply for a position with a law firm or govt. agency.

Therefore aside from DC and California; that online degree is not recognized as a qualifying law degree by 49 other states (give or take a few like Iowa that may make an exception with 10 years of experience).

cobes1996

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Re: American Heritage University College of Law
« Reply #18 on: August 07, 2013, 11:24:48 AM »
Has anyone talked any of the faculty or administrative staff at this school?  I am looking at attending an on-line school and AH looks like a good choice.  I have tried to search for alumni or information about the current staff, but I can't find anything. 

Maintain FL 350

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Re: American Heritage University College of Law
« Reply #19 on: August 07, 2013, 12:42:01 PM »
I have tried to search for alumni or information about the current staff, but I can't find anything.

The info regarding faculty/FYLSE/general bar exam pass rates is available on AHU's website. According to AHU, the bar exam pass rate for 2007-2012 is 0%. 

The same caveats apply to AHU that apply to all online/distance/non-ABA programs. These programs can be a good choice for the right student, but you need to fully understand the inherent limitations of such degree. As jonlevy pointed out, most states will not admit non-ABA students. I know that everyone loves to point out the handful of cases to the contrary, but those examples are few and far between.

Additionally, most employers will be suspicious about the quality of an online degree. Maybe that's unfair, but it's true nonetheless. If your goal is to take the CA bar and open a solo practice, that may not matter.

I think the main thing is just to be realistic about the implications. In my experience, then people who were bitter and disappointed after law school were the ones who had unrealistic expectations in the first place. Understand that attending an online school is going to present obstacles that traditional law schools won't, and go from there.