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Author Topic: For Current Law Students  (Read 1643 times)

smartandunique

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For Current Law Students
« on: September 29, 2010, 07:32:40 PM »
Other than the law-what else have u learned in law school or what do u think should be taught that isn't?

bigs5068

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Re: For Current Law Students
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2010, 03:26:54 PM »
I think more writing classes should be required. I also think before you graduate you should have performed some substantive work in a REAL case. The theories etc are important, but applying them to real life situations is not taught sufficiently enough in my opinion.

Thane Messinger

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Re: For Current Law Students
« Reply #2 on: October 01, 2010, 07:27:21 PM »
I think more writing classes should be required. I also think before you graduate you should have performed some substantive work in a REAL case. The theories etc are important, but applying them to real life situations is not taught sufficiently enough in my opinion.

Unfortunately, the writing done in law school bears only a passing resemblance to the writing done in practice.  So, lining up a part-time job in a law office (even volunteering) is an excellent opportunity.  It also, of course, leads to contacts and possible jobs thereafter.  Read Morten Lund's book on writing memos for a look at "writing in the real world"--will save a semester's time and headache, minus one hour.

Clinics in law school are a better approximation of practice, and should be taken at least once, if for no other reason than to be happy in a non-litigation choice.  For litigators, take 'em all.  = :   )

Thane.

bigs5068

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Re: For Current Law Students
« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2010, 07:37:42 PM »
I think Clinics are a good idea and should be a requirement for everyone. Maybe even have a 4th year that requires you to do nothing, but work in a clinic. They should probably do an on-campus one that acts as a law-firm. I think with the money that all of these schools are charging they could manage to do that. Then make it mandatory that a student handle real issues. If there are not enough REAL peopel coming to the clients, then you are in real world situation and you will have to figure out how to get people to come. I imagine that is the hardest part of being a lawyer in the real world. Getting people to choose you over the 1,000's of other lawyers out there. If you learn how to get clients you are way ahead of the game. I made this point on another thread, but I don't know how a lot of people including myself will handle things when it is REAL. I mean it is great to be able to rattle off a bunch of theories, but that is not really going to help anybody in the REAL world.

Morten Lund did make a good point that the way the law is taught is good for the long haul. It teaches you to be an attorney for years rather than a quick fix. I can understand that, but I would have no problem with extending school for a year and making schools form clinics that students MUST go through before handing them a J.D.

Morten Lund

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Re: For Current Law Students
« Reply #4 on: October 06, 2010, 12:48:14 AM »
Read Morten Lund's book

That's some quality advice right there by Mr. Messinger.

:)

louiebstef

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Re: For Current Law Students
« Reply #5 on: October 06, 2010, 09:31:45 AM »
Morten,

Are you being a shameless hussy?

 ;)
"Why be a lawyer? I'm already an ass.  Might as well go professional!"


Thane Messinger

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Re: For Current Law Students
« Reply #7 on: October 06, 2010, 04:25:02 PM »
Morten,

Are you being a shameless hussy?

 ;)

Pretty much.


Dear Shameless -

What I liked so much about the book was all the extra space provided.  What with the new Crayons mom just got, that provided plenty of room for commentary, and maybe a butterfly or two. 

Just one question:  I hear words like "memo" and then other, bigger words like "memorandum."  [Is that a mouthful or what?!]  Are they related?

Hamilton

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Re: For Current Law Students
« Reply #8 on: October 06, 2010, 11:38:35 PM »
One of my favorite classes was a pre-trial skills where we were paired up, one represented the plaintiff and one the defendent.  Through the class we sequentially had to go through the entire process: client agreement letter, pre-trial motions, establishing damages, settlement hearings, briefs, filings, taking depositions, pleadings and ending with arguments made to a real judge in a real courtroom on a motion for summary judgment.  Was a great excercise in writing, learning substantive law, and pre-trial procedures.

jack24

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Re: For Current Law Students
« Reply #9 on: October 07, 2010, 11:58:08 AM »
I think law schools should allow you to get credit for working even if you get paid.  Forcing students to choose between an externship for credit, and an internship for a tiny amount of money is dumb.
Pre-trial advocacy, trial advocacy, and legal clinics can be helpful, but I don't think they are more helpful than work experience. (I'm speaking from experience).

I think you should be able to get 1/3 of your 2L credit from a paid job/externship, and 1/2 of your 3L credit from a paid job/externship.  There would have to be some guidelines and rules involved, of course.

I also think schools should offer a couple bar prep classes during the third year that you can take.   Save everyone money on bar-bri.