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Author Topic: Quick question.  (Read 883 times)

Obliterati

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Quick question.
« on: August 16, 2010, 11:36:27 PM »
Sup guys, new to the forum. 

I'm an incoming college freshman, and I'm set on becoming a Lawyer when I get older. I'm planning on majoring in Philosophy, I started an internship etc. What I'm saying is I'm very excited about Law School and my future career.
I looked over the other thread with the kid in the same situation as me, looking to start studying for the LSATs 4 years from now, and I wanted to know what you guys would think an appropriate time to start studying would be. I already have my Kaplan book and I did a little bit of it, but I feel like I might burn myself out even with very sporadic studying.

Any feedback would be appreciated.

marcus-aurelius

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Re: Quick question.
« Reply #1 on: August 17, 2010, 08:18:37 AM »
The two biggest items in admissions is GPA and LSAT score.  I would try to focus on maintaing a 4.0 GPA, or as close to it for your first two years.  SOmetime during your third year, I would drop from 15 credits down to 12 for a semester, lower the amount of hours you work/intern if possible, and focus for 4-6 months on school and prep work.

marcus-aurelius

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Re: Quick question.
« Reply #2 on: August 17, 2010, 01:53:03 PM »
One more thing I though of.  With my experience, I would suggest taking the June test.  You can start prepping in January while you have no class.  And you can finish up the same way.  Just my 2 cents

Jeffort

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Re: Quick question.
« Reply #3 on: August 19, 2010, 08:44:58 PM »
  for the most part except for starting serious LSAT prep during your 2nd year of UG.  You can and should wait until bare minimum 3rd year to start going hard core with dedicated LSAT prep and practice. 

Getting familiar with the general parameters and content of the test, researching the ins and outs of Law Schools and the requirements for admission leisurely before 3rd year is fine while exploring post grad options.  However, it is not something to dive head on with at the cost of time for current studies at that point.  Wait until at least 3rd year when you largely have your GPA locked in and have been exposed to/explored various post-grad options before making the LSAT and LS admission your #1 priority and/or a major time dedication.

If I had suddenly jumped into dedicating myself to a many month study routine prepping to take the admission tests required for each of the various types of graduate programs I seriously contemplated during my 2nd year of UG I would have ended up spending all my time trying to prep for and take the LSAT, GRE, GMAT, MCAT and a few others all at the same time leaving me with no time for my UG classes and life. 

REALITY

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Re: Quick question.
« Reply #4 on: August 20, 2010, 01:56:43 PM »
Honest best advice, switch to the easiest(for you) major to get a 4.0 Don't worry about trying to do prelaw, it won't help, its a myth and a straight up lie. (not even a joke, ask actual lawstudents) If you have to take hard stuff do that LAST, I repeat LAST. Why? Because if you take it first and godforbid get a D is something first year, you end up on "academic probation" untill you do your next semester and bring it up. Lawschools will see that, and view it harshly. If you get that D after two years of 4.0, yeah it sucks but it dosn't hurt nearly as much and keeps you off the APdeathlist. 

2013JD

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Re: Quick question.
« Reply #5 on: August 20, 2010, 05:24:33 PM »
Hey Oblit, how goes it?

Very assertive of you to think this way.
I feel it takes a good 6-8 months to study hard for that brutal test but your gpa is also important.

Don't study for 4 years but doing a "light" workout here and there can't hurt.

As for PRe law and the such, I couldn't agree more with Reality.
Your major is irrelevant but I'd pick something to have an option because while you may end up being a great lawyer, options never hurt.

REALITY

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Re: Quick question.
« Reply #6 on: August 20, 2010, 06:04:12 PM »
Agreed. While pretty much anyone can get a 4.0 in "liberal arts" we all have our personal academic strengths and weaknesses.
If someone is great in science for example, go for that(and NOT if you "want" to become good at it) That way you have a backup field of work, plus if you get a BA in a science field you can sit the Patent Bar WITHOUT a JD(if you dont get into one of dont finish) same idea for a CPA(accounting degree) in some situations for taxcourt.(but don't even think about it unless you are great at math)

Whatever major you pick, don't pick "hard" electives to "learn more" Fthat. If possible even take a bucket load of one weekend long 1credit classes. Those tend to give an instant A just for showing up!

Hey Oblit, how goes it?

Very assertive of you to think this way.
I feel it takes a good 6-8 months to study hard for that brutal test but your gpa is also important.

Don't study for 4 years but doing a "light" workout here and there can't hurt.

As for PRe law and the such, I couldn't agree more with Reality.
Your major is irrelevant but I'd pick something to have an option because while you may end up being a great lawyer, options never hurt.

sonofapickle

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Re: Quick question.
« Reply #7 on: August 20, 2010, 10:10:07 PM »
^ Guy is giving you bad advice. On average physics/math and engineering majors outperform the "liberal arts" majors on the LSAT. It requires more brain activity and actually strengthens your brain for intense mental thought processes. You think quicker than others. Not everyone is bad at math nor do I believe in such generalizations full-heartedly. The kids I tutored emphasized they were horrible at mathematics, you know what? I taught them how to do problems, comprehend what it is telling them, and how to check their work effectively. Those same kids who emphatically exclaimed, "I suck at math," actually ended up receiving grades of B's and A's in their respective mathematics course. It is not on them that they are bad, it is the lackluster teachers who are teaching them in a horrible manner.

I used to suck at mathematics until I took the time to actually learn the material.

If you have a passion for the sciences, don't let some idiot tell you, "if you aren't great at math, then don't go into it!" That is stupid advice from a moron. If you have a passion for the sciences and find yourself having difficulty in understanding mathematics, then just find material on the net to learn mathematics from. When someone asks me what sites they can go to improve on their mathematics skills, I always suggest, "yourteacher.com," to first strengthen the core. Once you master the smaller material of mathematics, the rest will be easier for you to master as well (it will be hard but it won't be impossible to master). Many scientists had great difficulty with mathematics and people often called them idiots, yet most of those scientists who had great difficulty with mathematics turned out to be Pulitzer prize winners and jumped our society a few years ahead.





REALITY

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Re: Quick question.
« Reply #8 on: August 20, 2010, 11:02:32 PM »
says the guy who hasn't even taken an LSAT yet(just so smart he dosn't need to, don't you know)
That's what lsat prep is for. I never took it, but others did and they said it helped a lot. I believe them.
GPA is important. Don't let an undergrad troll trick you based on what he saw on matlock reruns last night.

^ Guy is giving you bad advice. On average physics/math and engineering majors outperform the "liberal arts" majors on the LSAT. It requires more brain activity and actually strengthens your brain for intense mental thought processes. You think quicker than others. Not everyone is bad at math nor do I believe in such generalizations full-heartedly. The kids I tutored emphasized they were horrible at mathematics, you know what? I taught them how to do problems, comprehend what it is telling them, and how to check their work effectively. Those same kids who emphatically exclaimed, "I suck at math," actually ended up receiving grades of B's and A's in their respective mathematics course. It is not on them that they are bad, it is the lackluster teachers who are teaching them in a horrible manner.

I used to suck at mathematics until I took the time to actually learn the material.

If you have a passion for the sciences, don't let some idiot tell you, "if you aren't great at math, then don't go into it!" That is stupid advice from a moron. If you have a passion for the sciences and find yourself having difficulty in understanding mathematics, then just find material on the net to learn mathematics from. When someone asks me what sites they can go to improve on their mathematics skills, I always suggest, "yourteacher.com," to first strengthen the core. Once you master the smaller material of mathematics, the rest will be easier for you to master as well (it will be hard but it won't be impossible to master). Many scientists had great difficulty with mathematics and people often called them idiots, yet most of those scientists who had great difficulty with mathematics turned out to be Pulitzer prize winners and jumped our society a few years ahead.

sonofapickle

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Re: Quick question.
« Reply #9 on: August 20, 2010, 11:53:17 PM »
Says the guy who attends Cooley, the magical school of wizards and clowns.