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Author Topic: I'm a felon... Can I be admitted to the bar of x state?!  (Read 3484 times)

john4040

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I'm a felon... Can I be admitted to the bar of x state?!
« on: August 04, 2010, 06:32:03 PM »
I've seen a lot of "will x conviction disqualify me from the practice of law" threads lately.  Here's a rundown of how a felony conviction would affect your admission.  Feel free to draw all reasonable inferences from the information...

Will a felony conviction bar an applicant from admission?
Alabama
Applicant must be granted a full pardon with civil rights restored before applicant will be considered for admission.

Arkansas
A felony conviction weighs heavily in admission decision.

Connecticut
Rebuttable presumption of lack of good moral character.

Delaware
Not an automatic bar, but felony conviction may affect finding of good moral character.

Florida
Not an automatic bar, but restoration of civil rights is required.

Georgia
Not an automatic bar, but a pardon or restoration of civil rights is necessary.

Idaho
Not an automatic bar, but felony conviction may affect finding of good moral character.

Indiana
Conviction of felony is prima facie evidence of lack of requisite good moral character. Applicant has the burden to overcome prima facie evidence.

Iowa
Not an automatic bar, but a felony conviction weighs heavily in admission decision.

Kansas
Persons convicted of a felony are ineligible to apply for admission until 5 years after the date of successful completion of sentence or period of probation.

Kentucky
Felony conviction does not always prohibit admission, but may affect finding of good moral character.

Maine
Conviction of a felony would not result in an automatic denial of admission. Applicant bears the burden of establishing good moral character.

Maryland
Conviction of felony would not result in automatic denial of admission. Applicant bears heavy burden of producing clear and convincing evidence of full and complete rehabilitation and present good moral character.

Massachusetts
Not automatic bar, but applicant must establish present good moral character.

Mississippi
Persons convicted of a felony except man-slaughter or a violation of the Internal Revenue Code are ineligible.

Missouri
Persons convicted of a felony are ineligible to apply for admission until 5 years after the date of successful completion of sentence or period of probation.

Montana
An applicant found guilty of a felony is conclusively presumed not to have present good moral character and fitness. The presumption ceases upon completion of the sentence and/or period of probation.

Nebraska
Conviction of felony would not result in an automatic denial of admission, but applicant would bear the heavy burden of producing clear and concise evidence of full and complete rehabilitation and present good moral character.

North Dakota
If offense is determined to have a direct bearing on applicant’s ability to serve the public as an attorney or if applicant is not sufficiently rehabilitated.

Ohio
Applicants convicted of a felony must meet specific conditions and undergo additional review before they can be approved.

Oregon
An applicant shall not be eligible for admission after having been convicted of a crime, the commission of which would have led to disbarment in all the circumstances present, had the person been an Oregon attorney at the time of conviction.

Pennsylvania
A felony conviction is viewed as a serious impediment to qualification.

Rhode Island
Conviction of a felony would not result in automatic denial, but applicant must establish good moral character.

South Carolina
Although not an automatic bar, felony conviction may affect finding of good moral character.

Texas
Felony conviction is an absolute bar to application and admission for 5 years after completion of sentence/probation; thereafter, the applicant must demonstrate present good moral character.

Utah
Conviction of a felony is prima facie evidence of lack of good moral character.

Virginia
Conviction of a felony or crime involving moral turpitude is not an automatic bar but may
affect finding of good moral character.

Wisconsin
Not an automatic bar, but applicant must establish present good character and fitness.

Guam
Conviction of a felony or crime involving moral turpitude is not an automatic bar to admission with certain exceptions.

Northern Mariana Islands
Ineligible unless applicant has been granted full pardon.

Palau
Applicant must have received a full pardon

Courtesy of http://www.ncbex.org/fileadmin/mediafiles/downloads/Comp_Guide/CompGuide_2010.pdf  (page 8)