Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: Can you circumvent the LSDAS GPA?  (Read 1225 times)

GatechTheron

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 6
    • View Profile
    • Email
Can you circumvent the LSDAS GPA?
« on: July 31, 2010, 03:17:29 PM »
Hypothetically of course  :D:

So based on what I have read about the GPA calculation, the LSDAS GPA is based on all of the courses that apply toward your degree.  Now, I am assuming that the body awarding one's degree is the one who decides what courses apply toward your degree.  This is fine.

However, what if you are a transfer student?  Say you transferred in 30+ hours to your graduating institution.  For every transferred class that you have received an unsatisfactory grade, can you systematically retake these courses at your graduating institution to obtain a higher grade, and thus eliminate a course from transferring in?  So now you would be transferring a 3.08 gpa at 27 hours, or a 3.2 gpa at 23hours and so forth?

I hope I explained this clearly.  Thoughts?

Thanks,
Theron Matthews

Cicero

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 201
  • UF 2012
    • View Profile
Re: Can you circumvent the LSDAS GPA?
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2010, 07:41:19 PM »
No, I don't think so. I retook one course in college (not F, just not high enough), and LSAC averaged in both grades. LSAC wants to see all the credits you've taken. LSAC will want the transcript from every college you have ever attended, even if you transferred and are no longer receiving a degree from that institution. You need to be careful not showing them all of your credits because you could get in trouble with LSAC or your law school if you get found out for attempting to hide them.

Cicero

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 201
  • UF 2012
    • View Profile
Re: Can you circumvent the LSDAS GPA?
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2010, 04:42:48 PM »
I wasn't trying to accuse you of being dishonest, just trying to let you know how seriously LSAC and law schools take everything. It would be nice if we could wipe out bad grades, but unfortunately LSAC doesn't let us do that. Good luck on the rest of your undergrad courses and when you apply to law school.  :)