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Author Topic: whittier  (Read 1639 times)

bigs5068

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Re: whittier
« Reply #10 on: July 08, 2010, 03:09:52 PM »
Yep I couldn't agree more I am going to bring another basketball example in. I was a really good high school player the best and biggest on my team and then I went to college and everybody there was also r a really good high school player and just as big as me. I wasn't special anymore I ended up being the 7th or 8th best player on the team.

Law school is the same way to get into any ABA school you have to graduate from college with a 3.0, which believe or not most people don't do. I know people in law school think that is an easy accomplishment, but that is because anyone in an ABA school is academically gifted. So considering about 30% of America's population has a bachelor's degree and probalby only 10% of that 30% even got a 3.0 you are dealing with a fairly elite group, but there is another step of that 10% you need to take the LSAT and get around a 150 and 50% of LSAT test takers finish below that. Again to people actually in law school a 150 doesn't seem that hard to accomplish, but again you have to be pretty smart to get a 150. That just shows even at Cooley or Appalachian the students are bright academically.


uopsu

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Re: whittier
« Reply #11 on: July 08, 2010, 10:17:00 PM »
Thanks for the advice....but regardless of whether or not I'll transfer I know I will have to study like crazy because I want to keep my scholarship from Whittier.  Futhermore, I know there will plenty of smart people who are going to be at Whittier and from what I have read the students at the school are pretty competitive.  So I will need to beat those people to rank near the top and get full ride.  If I decide to stay at Whittier I think I will be happy because I chose the school for the Children's Rights Clinic and also for public interest law which has Whittier as #27 in ranking for that type of program. 
And I was going to call the school for some info about current students but an email from the school says they are going to pair us up with mentors.  So I'm excited. 

dempsey

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Re: whittier
« Reply #12 on: July 09, 2010, 06:39:25 PM »
overstating how many smart people attend law school. This is all the more the case with Whittier.

bigs5068

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Re: whittier
« Reply #13 on: July 10, 2010, 04:42:58 AM »
What does that statement even mean?

dempsey

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Re: whittier
« Reply #14 on: July 10, 2010, 09:56:52 AM »
there are a lot of not very bright people at law schools. This is particularly true of Whittier.

bigs5068

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Re: whittier
« Reply #15 on: July 10, 2010, 01:19:14 PM »
Well I bet most of them are bright enough to know that you start a sentence with a capital letter.  That seems to be something you struggle with.

dempsey

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Re: whittier
« Reply #16 on: July 10, 2010, 09:09:48 PM »
Haha ok. Man I don't begrudge you your choice to attend a t4 and I wish you all the success in the world. But please stop the nonsense about t3 and t4 schools. They are an incredible risk, in a market that is devastated, and I could not in good conscious reccomend them for anyone. Your ardent defense of them simply strikes me as pathological.

bigs5068

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Re: whittier
« Reply #17 on: July 11, 2010, 04:51:46 PM »
Life is a risk  and nothing in life worth doing comes easy and when you take a risk there is a chance it might not work out.  However, if you want to be lawyer go to law school, if you want to be a nurse go to nursing school, and the list goes on forever and in all instances it might not work out.  If you don't want to take any risks go get a cashiering job or something right after high school you will have no educational debt and get by for the rest of your life. There is nothing wrong with that, but some people want something more challenging than a cashiering job and you need to take risks to achieve that. So if you want to be a lawyer go to law school.

The logic people use on this board would indicate if you got a 3.1 in high school and 1200 on your SAT that you should not go to college. I mean nobody hires anybody except Harvard Grads for jobs. If you go to San Diego State your throwing life away it is best to just go flip burgers with a horrendous 3.1 GPA and 1200 SAT. That is retarded  and as I said before anything worth doing is a risk, but education from an accredited  institution like an ABA law school is  a sensible risk. Are a Harvard Grads odds better than a Whittier Grads  of course.  However, people at Whittier get jobs. I interviewed with a judge awhile ago that went to none other than Whittier.  Crazy as it may sound, but law schools teach you the law and if you are a good lawyer it will show in the  real world no matter what school you went to and if you are a sh***y lawyer it will show no matter what school you went to.


Do you go to law school by the way?

Haynes7

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Re: whittier
« Reply #18 on: July 12, 2010, 05:32:55 PM »
I spoke with the Dean of Admissions at Whittier about their high attrition rate when I went down to visit the school in the spring.  He told me that their high attrition rate was due to the massive amount of transfers that occurred when the school was put on probation by the ABA.  In reality their attrition rate is something around 15% on average and easily half of those are transfers and not people who failed out.  Indeed, at a lower tier law school their attrition rates do tend to be higher because those who do well DO transfer out. 

I agree with many of your posts.  Going to law school is a huge honor and DOES place you amongst the smartest people in the country.  I think it is important to remember how lucky we all are to be attending law school. Pat yourself on the back now because law school and passing the bar are going to be hard enough. 

bigs5068

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Re: whittier
« Reply #19 on: July 12, 2010, 05:41:03 PM »
I spoke with the Dean of Admissions at Whittier about their high attrition rate when I went down to visit the school in the spring.  He told me that their high attrition rate was due to the massive amount of transfers that occurred when the school was put on probation by the ABA.  In reality their attrition rate is something around 15% on average and easily half of those are transfers and not people who failed out.  Indeed, at a lower tier law school their attrition rates do tend to be higher because those who do well DO transfer out. 

I agree with many of your posts.  Going to law school is a huge honor and DOES place you amongst the smartest people in the country.  I think it is important to remember how lucky we all are to be attending law school. Pat yourself on the back now because law school and passing the bar are going to be hard enough.


Yep that is true with almost every tier 4. The reason for the high attrition is transfers not people being kicked out. I mean it would make zero sense to cut 25% of your class as some retards suggest.  Why would you setup a system where you have to kick out people willing to pay you for a service?  It would make no sense the only reason any school kicks people out is because it is apparent they can't pass the bar and if you pull a 1.4 GPA in your first year of law school you are probably not going to pass the bar. It would be wrong to keep you there for another 2 years and take another 60k knowing your not going to pass the bar and if a school does that the ABA, which is a legitimate organization will step in as they did at GGU and Whittier. I don't know how Whittier addressed the problem, but I am sure they took similar steps that GGU did such as hiring a new dean, getting new staff, hiring bar instructors, creating a better a academic development program, and forming the HLP program, which has a 98% bar passage rate if you are in it.