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Author Topic: Part Time Law  (Read 2070 times)

cooleylawstudent

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Re: Part Time Law
« Reply #10 on: July 01, 2010, 01:10:52 PM »
whats the school? Also, there is a lot of rumor control out there but most employers dont care if you were pt or not.
Thanks for your comnts guys............Big reason is that my employer will pay almost 50% of my tuition and while working I will be able to pay my mortgage and my tuition too. I am just looking for improvement in my career, something better.

I am Okay with a mid size law firm that gives me decent money and a decent life. I just wanted to know if it possible or even the mid-size firm are going to throw away my resume just looking at the School name. How much does it matter? I have always been a good student in the past. GPA is not a problem for me.

latenightlaw

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Re: Part Time Law
« Reply #11 on: July 01, 2010, 01:40:56 PM »
I wasn't complaining that it is too hard, I was just trying to give a realistic view.  I made the choice to work and attend part time and just wanted to show the pros and cons from someone who is actually doing it.  I'd rather not take loans to pay off my other loans and would rather take 12 credits than 9.  Its doable, just not easy.  Before I got into the program I didn't realize PT would be basically the equivilent to full time in hours.  Unfortunately ABA doesn't allow you to work and take more the 12 credits or I would do more.  Just wanted OP to be aware that sacrifices are still required going PT.  I did my undergrad PT at night and it was a cakewalk compared to this, but I don't regret my choice.


First, you CAN afford to go without work(student loans) second, MOST people in the 9 credit program dont work. They live off mommy,daddy. or hubbie. If life is so hard with 12 why not bounce down to 9 or 6?

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cooleylawstudent

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Re: Part Time Law
« Reply #12 on: July 01, 2010, 01:44:05 PM »
It would have been just as hard to take the full 15 and work part time vs 12 and work fulltime.
Whats your job thats so hard? Are you an acccountant or something?

I wasn't complaining that it is too hard, I was just trying to give a realistic view.  I made the choice to work and attend part time and just wanted to show the pros and cons from someone who is actually doing it.  I'd rather not take loans to pay off my other loans and would rather take 12 credits than 9.  Its doable, just not easy.  Before I got into the program I didn't realize PT would be basically the equivilent to full time in hours.  Unfortunately ABA doesn't allow you to work and take more the 12 credits or I would do more.  Just wanted OP to be aware that sacrifices are still required going PT.  I did my undergrad PT at night and it was a cakewalk compared to this, but I don't regret my choice.


First, you CAN afford to go without work(student loans) second, MOST people in the 9 credit program dont work. They live off mommy,daddy. or hubbie. If life is so hard with 12 why not bounce down to 9 or 6?

[

latenightlaw

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Re: Part Time Law
« Reply #13 on: July 01, 2010, 01:53:37 PM »
My job isn't hard, finding the time to work, attend class, commute, study and still spend quality time with my family is what is hard.  Can't work PT because I carry the health ins for my family, my husband's health ins is ridiculously expensive.  The decision between PT and FT involves many more issues than just time.

I agree that doing 15 credits and working PT is just as hard as doing 12 credits and working full time.  Either way when you add in an extra 20-40 hours that you cannot devote to law school it makes it harder to fit it all in, do well and be sane.

It would have been just as hard to take the full 15 and work part time vs 12 and work fulltime.
Whats your job thats so hard? Are you an acccountant or something?

cooleylawstudent

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Re: Part Time Law
« Reply #14 on: July 01, 2010, 02:10:22 PM »
Hard to do no(people forget what hard is) but I agree with you on the sane part.

My job isn't hard, finding the time to work, attend class, commute, study and still spend quality time with my family is what is hard.  Can't work PT because I carry the health ins for my family, my husband's health ins is ridiculously expensive.  The decision between PT and FT involves many more issues than just time.

I agree that doing 15 credits and working PT is just as hard as doing 12 credits and working full time.  Either way when you add in an extra 20-40 hours that you cannot devote to law school it makes it harder to fit it all in, do well and be sane.

It would have been just as hard to take the full 15 and work part time vs 12 and work fulltime.
Whats your job thats so hard? Are you an acccountant or something?

latenightlaw

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Re: Part Time Law
« Reply #15 on: July 01, 2010, 02:30:22 PM »
Hmmmm, originally I said it "was not easy", you replied that it was hard.   :)
And its not easy, its time consuming and at times your brain is fried and you need sleep and you do go insane.  But working does not change the difficultly of the material (ie make it harder), just limits when you can work on it.

 
Hard to do no(people forget what hard is) but I agree with you on the sane part.

cooleylawstudent

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Re: Part Time Law
« Reply #16 on: July 01, 2010, 07:48:01 PM »
ok, your right. My bad. (damn people actually using logic instead of rambling that they dont understand and going off topic, damn yo!!!!!)
 8)

Hmmmm, originally I said it "was not easy", you replied that it was hard.   :)
And its not easy, its time consuming and at times your brain is fried and you need sleep and you do go insane.  But working does not change the difficultly of the material (ie make it harder), just limits when you can work on it.

 
Hard to do no(people forget what hard is) but I agree with you on the sane part.

chi2009

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Re: Part Time Law
« Reply #17 on: July 15, 2010, 03:34:58 PM »
Big reason is that my employer will pay almost 50% of my tuition and while working I will be able to pay my mortgage and my tuition too. I am just looking for improvement in my career, something better.

Personally, I wouldn't even think twice.  If your employer will pay half your tuition and you can still earn a decent income, do it.  I firmly believe that less debt = more opportunities.  PT students CAN get externships, internships, clerkships, and jobs.  I've met so many people who are now working at respectable firms that went part time.  Yes, you have to be creative and excel at time management and organization and get over the fact that you have NO flexibility in your schedule.  But it's doable.  The biggest disadvantage is you lose out on some of the programs that are only offered during the day - but, for me, that's not as important as minimizing debt.  You have to be diligent about seeking out opportunities that will help you, but it's doable.  Talk to other PTers and see how they did it.  It reflects well on your character when you can manage law school and work, especially if you keep your grades up.  And the other students in your program are going through the same thing so you won't feel like you're going completely crazy all by yourself.

I also went to grad school while working, and law school is totally different.  You cannot skim (or skip) the reading, show up, and expect to do well.  The material isn't hard - you just have to master it, which takes time.