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Author Topic: Chances?  (Read 538 times)

Shifty

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Chances?
« on: June 18, 2010, 11:12:51 PM »
Greetings!

I am currently wondering what my chances are at getting accepted into a top law program.  My GPA is a 4.0 from both my undergrad (B.A. in neuropsychology) and graduate programs (clinical psychology).  I have a scientific publication.  I am currently interning at my county's courthouse (pretrial investigations), and I have previous legal experience working for an SSI attorney.  I am also minority status.  I have not taken the LSAT  :-\  I am just wondering what score do I need to shoot for and what might my chances be?

Thanks to anyone who replies.

John1990

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Re: Chances?
« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2010, 11:34:33 AM »
Your lsat score is just as impotrant as your gpa.  So much so that a poor lsat score might ruin your chances of getting into lawschool despite your gpa.  Obviously you cant have a higher gpa than 4.00, so i would say your chances aren't bad.  Just do well on your lsat.  You should aim to get in the 160's or higher if your looking at tier 1 schools

the white rabbit

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Re: Chances?
« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2010, 06:41:20 PM »
Your lsat score is just as impotrant as your gpa.  So much so that a poor lsat score might ruin your chances of getting into lawschool despite your gpa.  Obviously you cant have a higher gpa than 4.00, so i would say your chances aren't bad.  Just do well on your lsat.  You should aim to get in the 160's or higher if your looking at tier 1 schools

I would say that the lsat is actually more important than the gpa.  What to shoot for?  The best score you can get, of course.
Mood: Tired but cheerful.  :)

BikePilot

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Re: Chances?
« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2010, 10:36:19 AM »
The only factors that really matter as best I can tell are lsat, gpa and race.  Give it your best, that much should have been obvious :o
HLS 2010

Shifty

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Re: Chances?
« Reply #4 on: June 20, 2010, 01:40:28 PM »
Your lsat score is just as impotrant as your gpa.  So much so that a poor lsat score might ruin your chances of getting into lawschool despite your gpa.  Obviously you cant have a higher gpa than 4.00, so i would say your chances aren't bad.  Just do well on your lsat.  You should aim to get in the 160's or higher if your looking at tier 1 schools

I would say that the lsat is actually more important than the gpa.  What to shoot for?  The best score you can get, of course.

Goodness!  I had no idea that the LSAT was more important than GPA. 

Thanks a lot for all the replies and advice.  I really appreciate it!

BikePilot

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Re: Chances?
« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2010, 07:02:28 PM »
Yeah the LSAT is a big deal.  I've no idea which is most important as both are pretty necessary to go to a top school. You can have a 4.0 and without a top lsat to match you aren't getting in at a T3 (unless you get an AA boost, which LSN suggests sometimes happens).  Anyway, study up and do your best on the lsat.  I'm sure you didn't get the 4.0 by being dumb or lazy, apply the same degree of effort (or more) to lsat prep and you should be in pretty good shape.
 
Note, the minority status only helps if your particular minority is underrepresented in law schools (i.e. being Jewish isn't going to help).
HLS 2010

Morten Lund

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Re: Chances?
« Reply #6 on: June 23, 2010, 09:08:12 PM »
With a 4.0 GPA you are clearly intelligent and diligent.  The LSAT is mainly a test of intelligence and diligence (preparation).  How much of each is hard to say.  With sufficient preparation you should be perfectly capable of acing the LSAT.  What score to shoot for?  Perfection, of course. 

Will you manage LSAT perfection?  Probably not - some random chance always sneaks in.  But with your track record and your ambitions, to aim for anything less would be silly.

The LSAT counts as much as your GPA (and perhaps even more).  As I like to say, you spent four years working on your GPA - in all fairness you should spend four years working on the LSAT as well.  Now, spending four years on LSAT prep is generally unrealistic, but my point is that you should take the LSAT very, very seriously, and you should prepare for it very, very thoroughly.  Reading a quick book and doing a practice exam doesn't count.  Practice, practice, and practice some more, until you know exactly what your score will be before you even sit down. 

The LSAT is completely learnable.  Taking the LSAT is a skill you can acquire with sufficient practice and determination.  If you are serious about law school, you need to be serious about the LSAT.

As for your chances of getting into a top school - well, that depends on what you mean by a "top school."  With a good LSAT score you should certainly be able to get into a top ten, but at the very top other odd factors start showing up, and admissions get less predictable.

For instance, I suspect that Yale would give you points for a scientific publication (peer-reviewed?), but might actually count your prior legal experience AGAINST you.  Hard to say (but don't worry - those experiences will be huge pluses when interviewing for legal jobs).  My experience is that the main defining feature of students at Yale/Harvard/Stanford is that they are all interesting.

But without an excellent LSAT score, your chances of getting into the top three is virtually zero.  Without a good LSAT score your chances of getting into a top ten school is pretty slim.

Take the LSAT very, very seriously.


Greetings!

I am currently wondering what my chances are at getting accepted into a top law program.  My GPA is a 4.0 from both my undergrad (B.A. in neuropsychology) and graduate programs (clinical psychology).  I have a scientific publication.  I am currently interning at my county's courthouse (pretrial investigations), and I have previous legal experience working for an SSI attorney.  I am also minority status.  I have not taken the LSAT  :-\  I am just wondering what score do I need to shoot for and what might my chances be?

Thanks to anyone who replies.