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Author Topic: Tier 4 Law Schools  (Read 32226 times)

HardWorking

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Tier 4 Law Schools
« on: June 13, 2010, 12:02:55 PM »
If you enjoy wasting your money, then by all means attend a Tier 4 law school.  Some people make it, a minority.  Others find themselves, unless they are top of their class, having a hard time finding jobs or decent paying jobs.  Be smart and retake the LSAT.  If you can avoid any tier 4 law school, do it.  Do you really want to attend a great undergrad or graduate school, only to attend a no-name law school?  It makes you look as though there is a disconnect.  People will wonder how you attended such respected universities for undergrad or graduate and now you are at a no-name school.  People question your ability and intelligence and when you graduate with tons of law school debt, you have to go up against people who graduated from good law schools when it is time to job hunt.  Avoid tier 4 schools at all costs.

bigs5068

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Re: Tier 4 Law Schools
« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2010, 01:14:45 PM »
Did you fail out of a tier 4? It seems you have no idea about you are talking about. I go to a tier 4 and it has worked for me up to this point and the majority of people who actually put WORK in. There are people that sit around and bi**h about this that and the other who are not making and people who screw around on their labtops during class and never do the reading who failed out. Bottom line is it is up to YOU for the most part not your school to make it in the legal profession.

Cicero

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Re: Tier 4 Law Schools
« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2010, 01:42:55 PM »
HardWorking, I disagree that it is a waste of money to go to a T-4 law school. It's only a waste of money if you go to law school because you aren't sure what to do next or if you are not willing to put in the work. (If that is the case, then it is a waste of money no matter what T it is.) Yes, going to a T-4 may mean you have an uphill battle in getting good summer work during school and finding a job after you graduate, especially if you want to move out of the region, but lots of people are able to make it work for them. Furthermore, you can get an excellent legal education at a T-4 school. It's not as if T-4 means poor quality teachers. As to the "disconnect", well, there are a lot of smart people who don't fair so well on standardized testing, so they end up going to T-4 schools.

Like bigs5068, I am also curious about your hostility toward T-4 schools. Is it based on your own personal experience or is it because you went to a T-1 and shun all those in the T-4 bracket?

bigs5068

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Re: Tier 4 Law Schools
« Reply #3 on: June 13, 2010, 01:59:59 PM »
Or a lot of smart people that get scholarships to go to tier 4's. I work with a ton of interns from Hastings and I am getting my education at half the cost and we are in the same position so what does that say.  ABA schools teach you the same things and every interview I have gone on the attorney's say law school just teaches you to pass the bar as long as you do that we will teach you the rest.  So why pay thousands more dollars to say I learned what consideration in a contract was from the 38th best school instead of 109th.

Yes it is true in BIG LAW firms that your school name matters, but those jobs are few and far between. So if your sole and only reason for going to law school is to make money then don't go to a tier 4 or any law school for that matter. There are a lot better ways to make money than becoming a lawyer, but if you want to be a lawyer shockingly you should go to law school and if you get a scholarship offer from the 79th best school or you can full price for the 51st I would say take the money. That is just my opinion though.

Cicero

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Re: Tier 4 Law Schools
« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2010, 02:08:53 PM »
bigs5068, that's definitely true, a lot of the students do end up going to T-4s because of the scholarship money. It's not just because of lower LSAT scores. The T-4s give out a lot of money. If you do well the 1st year, they are also likely to give you an even bigger scholarship.

nealric

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Re: Tier 4 Law Schools
« Reply #5 on: June 13, 2010, 03:11:08 PM »
Quote
  ABA schools teach you the same things and every interview I have gone on the attorney's say law school just teaches you to pass the bar as long as you do that we will teach you the rest.

No, no, no. You've got it all wrong. Law school doesn't teach you to pass the bar either. Barbri (or other non-monopolistic equivalent) teaches you to pass the bar.
You go to law school for the bar exam admission ticket.
Georgetown Law Graduate

Chief justice Earl Warren wasn't a stripper!
Now who's being naive?

bigs5068

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Re: Tier 4 Law Schools
« Reply #6 on: June 13, 2010, 03:12:16 PM »
Speaking of getting more money has anyone successfully bargained for more scholarship money with the threat of transferring? I imagine with my 1st year rank I could get into Hastings and definitely Santa Clara or USF, but I have no desire to leave GGU. However, I would like a bigger scholarship and I was just wondering if anyone had any experience negotiating for more money with the threat of transferring?

bigs5068

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Re: Tier 4 Law Schools
« Reply #7 on: June 13, 2010, 03:14:08 PM »
Quote
  ABA schools teach you the same things and every interview I have gone on the attorney's say law school just teaches you to pass the bar as long as you do that we will teach you the rest.

No, no, no. You've got it all wrong. Law school doesn't teach you to pass the bar either. Barbri (or other non-monopolistic equivalent) teaches you to pass the bar.
You go to law school for the bar exam admission ticket.

Barbri does help you significantly, but law school gives you the basics of what you need to know about how to pass the bar. Basically like teaching you to ride a bike before doing the tour de france. I imagine at Georgetown your first year you learned about consideration in a contract, the elements of negligence, easements, personal jurisdiction am I right? 

Cicero

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Re: Tier 4 Law Schools
« Reply #8 on: June 13, 2010, 03:15:44 PM »
Well, I had to talk to the Dean at my school before they would release my transcript, but they don't bargain about scholarships anymore. I heard that they used to do that during the discussion, but now they have a set scholarship amount they will give you based on your rank. Unfortunately, no full rides there.  :(

nealric

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Re: Tier 4 Law Schools
« Reply #9 on: June 13, 2010, 03:36:44 PM »
Quote
Barbri does help you significantly, but law school gives you the basics of what you need to know about how to pass the bar. Basically like teaching you to ride a bike before doing the tour de france. I imagine at Georgetown your first year you learned about consideration in a contract, the elements of negligence, easements, personal jurisdiction am I right? 

Meh-

I think most smart people could pass the bar with a few months pre-study + Barbri.

Sure, I learned the things you mentioned in law school, but the following is a list of subjects I did not take in law school (but are on the bar exam):
Conflict of Laws
Criminal Law
New York Procedure
Secured Transactions/Commercial Paper
Trust/Wills
Agency
Domestic Relations
Worker's Comp
No-Fault Insurance
Leases/Mortgages

The chances of me ever needing to know anything about the above subjects is close to 0 (secured transactions excepted), but I've got to learn them for the bar. By contrast, the bar exam does not test on a ton of classes I did take in law school. For example, I'm 8 tax credits short of an LLM, but the bar exam does not test federal taxation.
Georgetown Law Graduate

Chief justice Earl Warren wasn't a stripper!
Now who's being naive?