Law School Discussion

When Should I start studying for the LSAT and what resources should I use?

Hello,

Undergrad student here at SUNY Geneseo, and I want to get into a top school and I will get into a Top school if I apply my time on studying and make wiser desicions. I know this is an overall topic for discussion because the LSAT is extremely important, and difficult test and might I add EXPENSIVE. I saved up a couple thousands but I want to have like a perfect score or close to it, so I will like to start in my Junior year. Is that a good idea or am I waisting my money on the classes by starting early?

My top school choices are;
Harvard Law
Yale Law
Berkley Law
Cornell
Boston College Law
Boston University
NYU
cOLUMBIA ::)

Hello,

Undergrad student here at SUNY Geneseo, and I want to get into a top school and I will get into a Top school if I apply my time on studying and make wiser desicions. I know this is an overall topic for discussion because the LSAT is extremely important, and difficult test and might I add EXPENSIVE. I saved up a couple thousands but I want to have like a perfect score or close to it, so I will like to start in my Junior year. Is that a good idea or am I waisting my money on the classes by starting early?

My top school choices are;
Harvard Law
Yale Law
Berkley Law
Cornell
Boston College Law
Boston University
NYU
cOLUMBIA ::)

I think there's a limit to how long you can study, since you'll eventually run out of study materials and start getting out of practice as a result.  That said, I think that by starting to study early, you have some flexibility in terms of taking it when you feel comfortable with your level of preparation.  Better that than to run out of time and take it when you don't feel like you've done enough.

Good luck!  :)

EarlCat

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Don't worry about running out of materials.  Few people will take all 50someodd practice tests.  Even if you do, just reuse 'em.  In fact, plan on reusing materials because, IMHO, familiarity is ultimately more important than anything, and that familiarity is easier with repetition.

Burnout is a bigger potential problem.  If you're a nerd you might be able to study it for years and never get sick of it.  If you're normal, you'll probably want to gouge your eyeballs out after a few months.

Obviously you're prepared to invest in your prep, and that's great.  Do your homework finding out who the best teachers are in your area. 

One thing that I think is very very important is not to mix methods.  If you start, for instance, with a PowerScore class, then hire a tutor, hire one that uses PowerScore's method.  If you instead start with a Princeton Reveiew tutor, stick with Princeton Review's method.  If you start with PS, which takes one approach, then switch to TPR, which uses an entirely different approach, that gets confusing.  It's not that one method is better than another (at least, not enough for me to care), but whatever you do, pick one and run with it.

Hello,

Undergrad student here at SUNY Geneseo, and I want to get into a top school and I will get into a Top school if I apply my time on studying and make wiser desicions. I know this is an overall topic for discussion because the LSAT is extremely important, and difficult test and might I add EXPENSIVE. I saved up a couple thousands but I want to have like a perfect score or close to it, so I will like to start in my Junior year. Is that a good idea or am I waisting my money on the classes by starting early?

My top school choices are;
Harvard Law
Yale Law
Berkley Law
Cornell
Boston College Law
Boston University
NYU
cOLUMBIA ::)

Um, LSAT scores are good to use for applications for 3 years.  Take the LSAT the semester after you are done with your class.  No waiting around hoping to remember the info necessary!  It frees you up that much sooner to deal with the rest of the application materials.

Don't worry about running out of materials.  Few people will take all 50someodd practice tests.  Even if you do, just reuse 'em.  In fact, plan on reusing materials because, IMHO, familiarity is ultimately more important than anything, and that familiarity is easier with repetition.

Burnout is a bigger potential problem.  If you're a nerd you might be able to study it for years and never get sick of it.  If you're normal, you'll probably want to gouge your eyeballs out after a few months.

Obviously you're prepared to invest in your prep, and that's great.  Do your homework finding out who the best teachers are in your area. 

One thing that I think is very very important is not to mix methods.  If you start, for instance, with a PowerScore class, then hire a tutor, hire one that uses PowerScore's method.  If you instead start with a Princeton Reveiew tutor, stick with Princeton Review's method.  If you start with PS, which takes one approach, then switch to TPR, which uses an entirely different approach, that gets confusing.  It's not that one method is better than another (at least, not enough for me to care), but whatever you do, pick one and run with it.


Absolutely right, on all counts. 

Minor point as to the normal among us: even though you'll want to gouge your eyes out, if you really truly want to do law school and it's really truly important to get into a certain school, there's almost no amount of preparation that's too much.  So, a few months solid preparation is the minimum.  Is it possible to walk in cold and get that magic 180?  Well, it would be rather brave to state that it was impossible.  But it's close. 

If your LSAT is important to you--and for nearly everyone it is to a degree that is difficult to overstate--then you need to have an expansive view of just how much you're willing to put into it. 

Don't worry about running out of materials.  Few people will take all 50someodd practice tests. 

That's because they're all slackers.  :P