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Author Topic: Preparing for the LSAT; PowerScore Bibles  (Read 5272 times)

cooleylawstudent

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Re: Preparing for the LSAT; PowerScore Bibles
« Reply #10 on: May 28, 2010, 09:01:59 PM »
No *&^%, you'd PRACTICE. Thus the PRACTICE test. Thats what its there for.

"but, what if I didnt practice on how to practice........ ??? "

Whatever, if you try to ride a bike and don't know how, you will crash and burn. If you learn the basics beforehand, it's easy.

cmd758

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Re: Preparing for the LSAT; PowerScore Bibles
« Reply #11 on: May 28, 2010, 10:47:05 PM »
I agree with you about the reading comprehension section. LG and LR require a core of knowledge and then is, yes, essentially practice. Why are we discussing this?

Jeffort- Do whatever you want. Take a practice test cold or don't. Just know that if you learn some of the concepts and strategy for LG and LR, your life will be much easier for the prep. By learning these concepts and strategies, you can ascertain skill and knowledge in ten minutes that you might obtain otherwise in five practice tests. I am sure you realize that though.

Also- I just talked to my friend who recently graduated from USC and he said that the Powerscore Bibles were "The best prep tool he had ever encountered for anything." (To answer your original question  ;).)

sonofapickle

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Re: Preparing for the LSAT; PowerScore Bibles
« Reply #12 on: May 30, 2010, 06:50:01 PM »
Don't listen to Jeffort.

I have also been studying for the LSAT for two years now. By studying this long, I have not become "burnt out" nor have I declined. I sparse my prep-tests out until new editions arrive and then I buy those to take more prep tests. For over a month now I consecutively score in the high 170s, and I even intentionally answer some questions wrong as I don't want a perfect score (a quirk and funny joke of mine about the paradox of perfection). But, to say the least, the test has become second nature to me. When looking at the different types of logic games, I know how to map them and solve them easily. The logical reasoning portion seems like kid work to me now. The practice tests have become easy for me to pass now and I feel that the test may be just as easy due to some practice tests being actual questions from the real test.

In any case, I may just score in the high 170s if I keep my pace of tackling each test as if it were my last. That doesn't take away my notion of them being easy for me now.

cmd758

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Re: Preparing for the LSAT; PowerScore Bibles
« Reply #13 on: May 30, 2010, 07:05:45 PM »
Sorry, in my last post, I was addressing the second paragraph to the original poster and not to "Jeffort." Just noticed that and wanted to clarify.

EarlCat

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Re: Preparing for the LSAT; PowerScore Bibles
« Reply #14 on: May 30, 2010, 08:26:15 PM »
Don't listen to Jeffort.

I have also been studying for the LSAT for two years now. By studying this long, I have not become "burnt out" nor have I declined.

Yeah, don't listen to a guy who's been in the game for over a decade and tutored hundreds of students.  Listen to my personal anecdote instead.

sonofapickle

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Re: Preparing for the LSAT; PowerScore Bibles
« Reply #15 on: May 30, 2010, 08:42:05 PM »
Unless Jeffort can accurately attest to someone who has been studying for 2 years vs. someone who studies, lets say, a few months, then compare and constrast the individual performance on a test, then he has as much merit as I do on the subject of how long to study. If one studies a head of time then he/she maps out what their weaker areas are and can improve upon them, thus they have more time to work on weak areas, make their stronger areas even better, and study more for the LSAT.

Him tutoring a bunch of children is an irrelevant point as I am merely suggesting study tips. People are different, thus they have different temperaments, etc.., Jeffort saying "you will burn out" is an unfounded statement and his personal opinion on the matter. The OP may not burn out and from what he is saying, I can more accurately assume he won't, than Jeffort can assume he will.

I like that you find life similar to a game. In the essence of playing games, you are now 0-2. ;)

EarlCat

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Re: Preparing for the LSAT; PowerScore Bibles
« Reply #16 on: May 30, 2010, 08:58:38 PM »
Him tutoring a bunch of children is an irrelevant point as I am merely suggesting study tips. People are different, thus they have different temperaments, etc.., Jeffort saying "you will burn out" is an unfounded statement and his personal opinion on the matter. The OP may not burn out and from what he is saying, I can more accurately assume he won't, than Jeffort can assume he will.

Read it again, genius, he said, "You could easily burn out . . ."  Jeffort didn't assume that he would burn out or even that he probably would burn out.

Quote
I like that you find life similar to a game. In the essence of playing games, you are now 0-2. ;)

lol



sonofapickle

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Re: Preparing for the LSAT; PowerScore Bibles
« Reply #17 on: May 30, 2010, 09:13:52 PM »
"He did not assume he would burn out or even that he probably would burn out..."

Before I move onto my point. I must attack your post due to the blatant insult at my intelligence.

You self contradicted yourself within that same post. First and foremost the contradiction lies within you saying, "probably would burn out," if you had not noticed "probably" is the same way as saying, "vey likely." That means it is more easy for a person to burn out when studying for that long period of time. When I re-read his post, he said, "it is easy for you to burn out."

Onto my point. Jeffort did assume, and that is where you are wrong. His assumption took place when he noted, "you could easily burn out." Him stating as such is an assumption. If you do not know what assumption means then here is the gist, "conjecture based on no proof; guesswork." Jeffore merely was guessing the OP's temperament level and added in, "you could easily burn out." That is an assumption that the OP has a far more likely chance of burning out than not burning out. Jeffort does not know the OP nor did he ask the OP any further questions to give an accurate assessment of his burnability. He just assumed he would easily burn out if he studied for that long.

As usual, 0-3.

cmd758

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Re: Preparing for the LSAT; PowerScore Bibles
« Reply #18 on: May 30, 2010, 09:33:17 PM »
Aren't we all in the same boat here? Or aren't the other people here to help people because they went through the same process? Why bicker and start long, off-topic discussions.

EarlCat

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Re: Preparing for the LSAT; PowerScore Bibles
« Reply #19 on: May 30, 2010, 09:44:41 PM »
"He did not assume he would burn out or even that he probably would burn out..."

Before I move onto my point. I must attack your post due to the blatant insult at my intelligence.

You self contradicted yourself within that same post. First and foremost the contradiction lies within you saying, "probably would burn out," if you had not noticed "probably" is the same way as saying, "vey likely." That means it is more easy for a person to burn out when studying for that long period of time. When I re-read his post, he said, "it is easy for you to burn out."

Onto my point. Jeffort did assume, and that is where you are wrong. His assumption took place when he noted, "you could easily burn out." Him stating as such is an assumption. If you do not know what assumption means then here is the gist, "conjecture based on no proof; guesswork." Jeffore merely was guessing the OP's temperament level and added in, "you could easily burn out." That is an assumption that the OP has a far more likely chance of burning out than not burning out. Jeffort does not know the OP nor did he ask the OP any further questions to give an accurate assessment of his burnability. He just assumed he would easily burn out if he studied for that long.

No, he assumed the guy could easily burn out.  Do you know what "could" means???  Here's a hint.  It doesn't mean "far more likely than not."  This bit-o-knowledge may come in handy next month.