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Author Topic: When in doubt is "D" still the best answer?  (Read 769 times)

lawschlgirl

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When in doubt is "D" still the best answer?
« on: May 07, 2010, 08:56:43 AM »
So i took a prep course and just wanted to know, is "D" still the best choice to fill in if you are in doubt or run out of time. Also, are the last 2 sections the one that alwyas count on the exam?

Thanks!

sequoia90

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Re: When in doubt is "D" still the best answer?
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2010, 02:32:22 AM »
As for the "D" question, I have no idea.

But the last two sections DEFINITELY are included in your score.

LSAC won't have any testing fatigue messing up their experimental section, so they always include it in the first three.

Hope that helps...

Jeffort

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Re: When in doubt is "D" still the best answer?
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2010, 04:47:40 AM »
So i took a prep course and just wanted to know, is "D" still the best choice to fill in if you are in doubt or run out of time. Also, are the last 2 sections the one that alwyas count on the exam?

Thanks!

You should treat 'when in doubt' situations differently than 'running out of time and having to blind guess' situations.  If you have put some effort into a question and narrowed down the contender answer choices, going with (D) or some other letter by default would be silly, especially if you already rejected it.  In those situations go with an educated guess between the answers you have not already eliminated.

As for pure blind guessing on questions you are not able to attempt, it's really a matter of luck.  Historically, over all test forms, (D) has a slightly higher probability of being the answer than other letters (slightly above 20% chance), but we are talking about minuscule differences in answer choice probabilities. 

Keep it simple, pick one letter to use for blind guesses, stick with it and that it comes up just like people do when betting on roulette. 

Many books and big prep companies have been saying pick (D) for years and from my experience teaching I have noticed that most people that have to blind guess at the end of sections go with (D) due to that common recommendation.  Given that, and that LSAC does heavy number crunching statistical analysis on test day performance/results, I doubt they have not noticed that pattern.  It is not that hard to notice that on every test there are a bunch of answer sheets with several (D)'s bubbled in a row at the end of sections!  This is just my theory, but do you think LSAC wants a bunch of people getting inflated scores due to heavy prevalence of (D)'s at the end of sections?  I think not.  Don't waste time and energy worrying about this issue, decide on a letter and spend your mental power and time getting ready for the substance of the test.

cooleylawstudent

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Re: When in doubt is "D" still the best answer?
« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2010, 11:46:17 AM »
its ok to guess, but honestly the LSAT gives you shittloads of time to finish each section, you shouldnt run out of time at all. Just hold your piss untill break and you'll be fine(unless you have a learning disability and then inform the proctors of that well in advance) Take a few timed practive ones if you need proof.

Jeffort

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Re: When in doubt is "D" still the best answer?
« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2010, 03:53:10 PM »
its ok to guess, but honestly the LSAT gives you shittloads of time to finish each section, you shouldnt run out of time at all. Just hold your piss untill break and you'll be fine(unless you have a learning disability and then inform the proctors of that well in advance) Take a few timed practive ones if you need proof.

I disagree.  The LSAT is a highly time pressured exam and with 35 minutes per section you have very little time to thoroughly analyze and answer each question.  I would hardly say 35 minutes is a $hitload of time to complete each section.  If you go a little slow or get caught up by and stuck on a few time trap/difficult questions per section for 2min or more it is very easy to end up running out of time before completing the section and then having to bubble in some blind guesses before time is called.

One of the many skills the LSAT is designed to measure is time management and how well you can analyze and reason through new substance in a short period of time while under pressure.  I find your claim perplexing.  In all the years I've been teaching people how to perform well on this test I've never had a student say anything to the effect of being given more than enough time per section.  Rather, it is the opposite, students frequently complain about not having enough time and often say things like 'if I had a few more minutes per section I would score much higher'.

As for your comment about learning disabilities, it seems pretty insensitive and like you are implying that people who have trouble finishing sections in 35min must have a learning disability.  That's pretty insulting if it is what you meant. 

And to clarify it for others, if one has a legitimate disability that merits getting extra time or other test day special accommodations from LSAC, you don't tell the proctors about it/ask the proctors for it, you apply for special accommodations to the proper department of LSAC far in advance of your desired test date and have to supply all sorts of medical reports and stuff to justify the request.