Law School Discussion

in-state tuition?

in-state tuition?
« on: May 05, 2010, 11:15:25 AM »
So I have a dilemma. I am a resident of PA. I want to go to Rutgers in Jersey. My family has a home in Jersey...a beach house in OC NJ that we have had for the past 10 years.

I am wondering if it's possible to somehow make this my permanent residence so I can receive in-state tuition. I know some people may frown upon this idea...but the fact of the matter is would end up saving probably around 30,000. that's a lot.

Does anyone have any idea who I could contact about this? On my application I said my permanent residence is in PA. But I could just say I have moved to my beach house in NJ.

Anyone have any idea what sort of process I need to go through??

Any help would be much appreciated !

'blueskies

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Re: in-state tuition?
« Reply #1 on: May 05, 2010, 11:21:15 AM »
You already said you were a permanent of PA, I don't think there's anything you can do to change that.  Look up the school's policy for getting instate tuition; you should be able to apply to get it after your first year.

Re: in-state tuition?
« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2010, 11:35:11 AM »
You already said you were a permanent of PA, I don't think there's anything you can do to change that.  Look up the school's policy for getting instate tuition; you should be able to apply to get it after your first year.

yeah...

But I could simply say "oh I moved today. I now permanently live in Ocean City New Jersey."

what are they going to say to that? You know what I mean?

'blueskies

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Re: in-state tuition?
« Reply #3 on: May 05, 2010, 11:48:43 AM »
well, that's unethical and you shouldn't do it.  I don't know what they would do, but you probably have to be a resident in a state for a year to get in-state tuition (that's how most places work).  So even if you were going to lie, it probably wouldn't even get you anywhere.

Re: in-state tuition?
« Reply #4 on: June 20, 2010, 08:39:32 PM »
Call the school and check.  Every school has a different policy on in-state tuition.  Since your family owns property in NJ and pays property taxes there, you may already be considered in-state -- you would be if you were going to my school (and as long as you're still considered a dependent).

Cicero

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Re: in-state tuition?
« Reply #5 on: June 20, 2010, 09:06:43 PM »
You can check with the school, but it does generally take around 12 months (but some will go ahead and let you get it a month early or so (based on personal experience), but not much earlier than that). You will usually need to show that you have have ties to the state for that long by establishing a residence (generally cannot be on campus), getting a DL, getting a voter's registration & voting, paying taxes, etc.

cooleylawstudent

Re: in-state tuition?
« Reply #6 on: June 20, 2010, 09:28:58 PM »
bull, thats as dumb as the "you can't change your state" posts earlier. The school will have a mandatory length to be considered a "residant" just live there that length and you'll be fine. No honor code violation. When it asks prior residances be honest, it wont change a thing and you wont have to worry about ethics due to up front honesty.

Hell, even in civil procedere they tell you that if you want to take your next door neighbor to federal court on diversity you can laugh your way across state lines and sue the next day for that even though that is the only reason you moved and that very day. Its American, love it, learn it, deal with it.

well, that's unethical and you shouldn't do it.  I don't know what they would do, but you probably have to be a resident in a state for a year to get in-state tuition (that's how most places work).  So even if you were going to lie, it probably wouldn't even get you anywhere.

Cicero

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Re: in-state tuition?
« Reply #7 on: June 20, 2010, 09:36:27 PM »

Hell, even in civil procedere they tell you that if you want to take your next door neighbor to federal court on diversity you can laugh your way across state lines and sue the next day for that even though that is the only reason you moved and that very day. Its American, love it, learn it, deal with it.


umm, you have to establish a residence and show an intent to remain there indefinitely. You can do it the day before you file the lawsuit or go there for the "purpose of creating diversity" IF you can show those things. You can't really just waltz over to the next state and file without those other things. Well, I guess you could, but I would hope the opposing counsel would call BS on it.

cooleylawstudent

Re: in-state tuition?
« Reply #8 on: June 20, 2010, 10:23:21 PM »
You must've skipped day one. Case presedent already set when someone did just that.


Hell, even in civil procedere they tell you that if you want to take your next door neighbor to federal court on diversity you can laugh your way across state lines and sue the next day for that even though that is the only reason you moved and that very day. Its American, love it, learn it, deal with it.


umm, you have to establish a residence and show an intent to remain there indefinitely. You can do it the day before you file the lawsuit or go there for the "purpose of creating diversity" IF you can show those things. You can't really just waltz over to the next state and file without those other things. Well, I guess you could, but I would hope the opposing counsel would call BS on it.

Cicero

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Re: in-state tuition?
« Reply #9 on: June 21, 2010, 12:56:28 PM »
Supreme court or or circuit specific? We never covered any case saying you could just  make up diversity completely. We did cover precedent to help prevent people from destroying diversity through collusive practices and allowing party realignment. And no, I never missed a day in Civ Pro. In fact, I did really well in it. If there is a case allowing people to just make up diversity, we never covered that one.