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Author Topic: Law School should be approached with caution  (Read 14560 times)

cooleylawstudent

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Re: Law School should be approached with caution
« Reply #40 on: May 12, 2010, 09:41:25 PM »
God damn you're an idiot. Check the dates on shitt, that was two terms ago retard. "people can do things over periods of time.......insane!"  ::)

so your simple mind is confused why after saying "its not true" someone would reply "it is true and here is why"?
Ain't that hard man, it may seem that way for you, but it shouldnt be.

To address other comments - yes, some Harvard law grads ARE having difficulty finding work.

Was this directed toward me?  ???  Because all I said was that lots of Harvard grads do not have it hard, not all Harvard grads. 

I saw on another thread that you have yet to start Cooley. Please tone down your nastiness and listen to us. Get out while you can (unless you have a close relative in the practice).

the white rabbit

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Re: Law School should be approached with caution
« Reply #41 on: May 14, 2010, 07:20:43 AM »
Trust me, we are looked down upon.

I wasn't saying one way or the other.
Mood: Tired but cheerful.  :)

Bryan Goldberg

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Re: Law School should be approached with caution
« Reply #42 on: June 23, 2010, 12:17:39 AM »
Hi,

I graduated from the "best law school in downtown Lansing" back in 1994 and hated it.  Thankfully, the tuition was reasonable. 

Cooley is just one of many Tier 3/4 schools.  It's specialness comes from an attitude that confirms that its administration, and more than a few of its students, suffer from untempered feelings of inferiority.  The self-ranking silliness is one example.  The naming rights to the ball park is another.

That being said, I have no regrets.  My legal training has been an invaluable asset in my business.  And, after surviving 3 years of brutal competitiveness, I now usually hold my own with the people I have to deal with to sustain my small business.

If you've got a career and want to enhance your skill set with a law degree and license, then the decision to go to Cooley involves little more than a standard costs/benefits analysis.  If you want prestige, money and connections that will open doors, then you really don't want to go to a school like Cooley.   

Bryan 

cooleylawstudent

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Re: Law School should be approached with caution
« Reply #43 on: June 23, 2010, 12:34:55 AM »
Yes, having a sports park named after you.......dear God!  :o

I notice you say small business and not lawfirm. Why is that?

Hi,

I graduated from the "best law school in downtown Lansing" back in 1994 and hated it.  Thankfully, the tuition was reasonable. 

Cooley is just one of many Tier 3/4 schools.  It's specialness comes from an attitude that confirms that its administration, and more than a few of its students, suffer from untempered feelings of inferiority.  The self-ranking silliness is one example.  The naming rights to the ball park is another.

That being said, I have no regrets.  My legal training has been an invaluable asset in my business.  And, after surviving 3 years of brutal competitiveness, I now usually hold my own with the people I have to deal with to sustain my small business.

If you've got a career and want to enhance your skill set with a law degree and license, then the decision to go to Cooley involves little more than a standard costs/benefits analysis.  If you want prestige, money and connections that will open doors, then you really don't want to go to a school like Cooley.   

Bryan

Bryan Goldberg

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Re: Law School should be approached with caution
« Reply #44 on: June 23, 2010, 06:59:28 AM »
Hi,

My small business is not a law firm.

Bryan

cooleylawstudent

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Re: Law School should be approached with caution
« Reply #45 on: June 23, 2010, 07:26:38 AM »
Did you pass the bar? If so what made you decide the business you have? What type is it, is it reflective of your undergrad training?


Hi,

My small business is not a law firm.

Bryan

Bryan Goldberg

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Re: Law School should be approached with caution
« Reply #46 on: June 23, 2010, 04:16:47 PM »
Hi,

Yes, of course.

My wife and I were seeking a safe haven for our investments.  As it turns out, our timing was excellent and we got out while the getting was good.

Our LLC manages a medical professional building with a regional hospital's emergency (urgent care) department being our major lessee. 

Broadly speaking, I would say it is reflective of my undergraduate degree in psychology, and my masters degree in business.  However, as I stated in my earlier post, it is my legal training at Cooley that I believe is most responsible for my success.

Bryan

cooleylawstudent

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Re: Law School should be approached with caution
« Reply #47 on: June 23, 2010, 07:28:22 PM »
Well, I guess you are proof of my argument that having a JD is a good thing even if you dont enter law(take that random posters who's names aren't important enough for me to remember!)

Are you trying to say cooley is the reason you aren't capable of doing law though? That seems to be the vive, can you be more specific why?


Hi,

Yes, of course.

My wife and I were seeking a safe haven for our investments.  As it turns out, our timing was excellent and we got out while the getting was good.

Our LLC manages a medical professional building with a regional hospital's emergency (urgent care) department being our major lessee. 

Broadly speaking, I would say it is reflective of my undergraduate degree in psychology, and my masters degree in business.  However, as I stated in my earlier post, it is my legal training at Cooley that I believe is most responsible for my success.

Bryan

Bryan Goldberg

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Re: Law School should be approached with caution
« Reply #48 on: June 23, 2010, 10:46:35 PM »
Hi,

I do believe that an attorney who represents himself has a fool for a client.  So, when I need to resort to legal remedy on an LLC matter, I retain counsel.

But I keep my hand in the game and take a few cases a year as time permits

You'd have to ask the judges I've appeared before, the opposing counsels I've engaged, and the clients I've represented to satisfy yourself as to whether I'm capable of "doing law."

Bryan



cooleylawstudent

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Re: Law School should be approached with caution
« Reply #49 on: June 23, 2010, 10:51:12 PM »
I never asked if you represented yourself. If your not in law and dont represent youreself do you think its a wasted degree for you then?

At the end of the day why don't you do law for real and not just a few cherrypicked clients? Why not fulltime it? I jog a mile every now and then but it dosn't make me an olympic athlete.

Hi,

I do believe that an attorney who represents himself has a fool for a client.  So, when I need to resort to legal remedy on an LLC matter, I retain counsel.

But I keep my hand in the game and take a few cases a year as time permits

You'd have to ask the judges I've appeared before, the opposing counsels I've engaged, and the clients I've represented to satisfy yourself as to whether I'm capable of "doing law."

Bryan