Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: Dear URMs (from the LSAC)  (Read 1792 times)

legalized

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 136
    • View Profile
Dear URMs (from the LSAC)
« on: May 04, 2010, 01:50:58 PM »
Frequently Asked Questions
About Racial and Ethnic Status
 Don’t be afraid to dream about going to school—whether it be college or law school. You have as much right to be there as anyone else.

Why am I considered a minority applicant?
Law schools consider your ethnic or racial status to be whatever you indicate on your LSAT registration forms. This factor alone is not a guarantee of admission, but it helps admission committees form a more complete picture of who you are. They are interested in how your individual history has affected your life, including whatever disadvantages you may have overcome.

Is the LSAT biased against minorities?
The passages and questions on the LSAT go through a rigorous screening and pretesting process to make sure that the individual test items are not biased. The primary reason that minority test takers perform less well on the LSAT is lack of preparation. In addition, research indicates that minority group members, particularly African Americans, are more vulnerable to test anxiety than other test takers. The best way to avoid test anxiety is to prepare thoroughly for the LSAT by familiarizing yourself with the types of questions on the test and by taking disclosed (previously administered) tests. Take the entire test—not just a few sections at a time—under actual timed conditions.

more at http://lsac.org/SpecialInterests/minorities-in-legal-education-faq.asp

Those wondering what's considered a URM for law school purposes...I would guess it's the minorities they track, as shown here:

http://lsac.org/SpecialInterests/minorities-in-legal-education-min-enroll.asp

cooleylawstudent

  • Guest
Re: Dear URMs (from the LSAC)
« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2010, 11:10:09 PM »
Love it! Just recently some idiot on this forum tried telling me that asians weren't URM's.

Frequently Asked Questions
About Racial and Ethnic Status
 Don’t be afraid to dream about going to school—whether it be college or law school. You have as much right to be there as anyone else.

Why am I considered a minority applicant?
Law schools consider your ethnic or racial status to be whatever you indicate on your LSAT registration forms. This factor alone is not a guarantee of admission, but it helps admission committees form a more complete picture of who you are. They are interested in how your individual history has affected your life, including whatever disadvantages you may have overcome.

Is the LSAT biased against minorities?
The passages and questions on the LSAT go through a rigorous screening and pretesting process to make sure that the individual test items are not biased. The primary reason that minority test takers perform less well on the LSAT is lack of preparation. In addition, research indicates that minority group members, particularly African Americans, are more vulnerable to test anxiety than other test takers. The best way to avoid test anxiety is to prepare thoroughly for the LSAT by familiarizing yourself with the types of questions on the test and by taking disclosed (previously administered) tests. Take the entire test—not just a few sections at a time—under actual timed conditions.

more at http://lsac.org/SpecialInterests/minorities-in-legal-education-faq.asp

Those wondering what's considered a URM for law school purposes...I would guess it's the minorities they track, as shown here:

http://lsac.org/SpecialInterests/minorities-in-legal-education-min-enroll.asp


Pardon Johnny Cash.

  • Global Moderator
  • LSD Obsessed
  • ****
  • Posts: 5310
    • View Profile
Re: Dear URMs (from the LSAC)
« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2010, 03:37:42 PM »
Love it! Just recently some idiot on this forum tried telling me that asians weren't URM's.


Well, Asians are probably URMs at Cooley...

cooleylawstudent

  • Guest
Re: Dear URMs (from the LSAC)
« Reply #3 on: May 05, 2010, 10:02:51 PM »
Hey genius, look at the link, what does the ABA say URM's are? Asians are on that list, so despite what crawled up your ass, thats the offical rules on it.  "but.....but....cooley....." :'(


Love it! Just recently some idiot on this forum tried telling me that asians weren't URM's.


Well, Asians are probably URMs at Cooley...

legalized

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 136
    • View Profile
Re: Dear URMs (from the LSAC)
« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2010, 03:42:06 PM »
Love it! Just recently some idiot on this forum tried telling me that asians weren't URM's.

Frequently Asked Questions
About Racial and Ethnic Status
 Don’t be afraid to dream about going to school—whether it be college or law school. You have as much right to be there as anyone else.

Why am I considered a minority applicant?
Law schools consider your ethnic or racial status to be whatever you indicate on your LSAT registration forms. This factor alone is not a guarantee of admission, but it helps admission committees form a more complete picture of who you are. They are interested in how your individual history has affected your life, including whatever disadvantages you may have overcome.

Is the LSAT biased against minorities?
The passages and questions on the LSAT go through a rigorous screening and pretesting process to make sure that the individual test items are not biased. The primary reason that minority test takers perform less well on the LSAT is lack of preparation. In addition, research indicates that minority group members, particularly African Americans, are more vulnerable to test anxiety than other test takers. The best way to avoid test anxiety is to prepare thoroughly for the LSAT by familiarizing yourself with the types of questions on the test and by taking disclosed (previously administered) tests. Take the entire test—not just a few sections at a time—under actual timed conditions.

more at http://lsac.org/SpecialInterests/minorities-in-legal-education-faq.asp

Those wondering what's considered a URM for law school purposes...I would guess it's the minorities they track, as shown here:

http://lsac.org/SpecialInterests/minorities-in-legal-education-min-enroll.asp


Well, I think what they mean is Asians are the LEAST sought after URMs because there are actually a high number of them, relative to the other minorities, enrolled in law schools.  But, they are still part of the minority count at these schools and yes, still URMs.

cooleylawstudent

  • Guest
Re: Dear URMs (from the LSAC)
« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2010, 07:49:00 PM »
"you think" being the operative part of that.

You're just a racist and you know it, they're all just yellow-n-word's to you ain't they? >:(

Love it! Just recently some idiot on this forum tried telling me that asians weren't URM's.

Frequently Asked Questions
About Racial and Ethnic Status
 Don’t be afraid to dream about going to school—whether it be college or law school. You have as much right to be there as anyone else.

Why am I considered a minority applicant?
Law schools consider your ethnic or racial status to be whatever you indicate on your LSAT registration forms. This factor alone is not a guarantee of admission, but it helps admission committees form a more complete picture of who you are. They are interested in how your individual history has affected your life, including whatever disadvantages you may have overcome.

Is the LSAT biased against minorities?
The passages and questions on the LSAT go through a rigorous screening and pretesting process to make sure that the individual test items are not biased. The primary reason that minority test takers perform less well on the LSAT is lack of preparation. In addition, research indicates that minority group members, particularly African Americans, are more vulnerable to test anxiety than other test takers. The best way to avoid test anxiety is to prepare thoroughly for the LSAT by familiarizing yourself with the types of questions on the test and by taking disclosed (previously administered) tests. Take the entire test—not just a few sections at a time—under actual timed conditions.

more at http://lsac.org/SpecialInterests/minorities-in-legal-education-faq.asp

Those wondering what's considered a URM for law school purposes...I would guess it's the minorities they track, as shown here:

http://lsac.org/SpecialInterests/minorities-in-legal-education-min-enroll.asp


Well, I think what they mean is Asians are the LEAST sought after URMs because there are actually a high number of them, relative to the other minorities, enrolled in law schools.  But, they are still part of the minority count at these schools and yes, still URMs.

legalized

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 136
    • View Profile
Re: Dear URMs (from the LSAC)
« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2010, 07:01:30 PM »
"you think" being the operative part of that.

You're just a racist and you know it, they're all just yellow-n-word's to you ain't they? >:(

Love it! Just recently some idiot on this forum tried telling me that asians weren't URM's.

Frequently Asked Questions
About Racial and Ethnic Status
 Don’t be afraid to dream about going to school—whether it be college or law school. You have as much right to be there as anyone else.

Why am I considered a minority applicant?
Law schools consider your ethnic or racial status to be whatever you indicate on your LSAT registration forms. This factor alone is not a guarantee of admission, but it helps admission committees form a more complete picture of who you are. They are interested in how your individual history has affected your life, including whatever disadvantages you may have overcome.

Is the LSAT biased against minorities?
The passages and questions on the LSAT go through a rigorous screening and pretesting process to make sure that the individual test items are not biased. The primary reason that minority test takers perform less well on the LSAT is lack of preparation. In addition, research indicates that minority group members, particularly African Americans, are more vulnerable to test anxiety than other test takers. The best way to avoid test anxiety is to prepare thoroughly for the LSAT by familiarizing yourself with the types of questions on the test and by taking disclosed (previously administered) tests. Take the entire test—not just a few sections at a time—under actual timed conditions.

more at http://lsac.org/SpecialInterests/minorities-in-legal-education-faq.asp

Those wondering what's considered a URM for law school purposes...I would guess it's the minorities they track, as shown here:

http://lsac.org/SpecialInterests/minorities-in-legal-education-min-enroll.asp


Well, I think what they mean is Asians are the LEAST sought after URMs because there are actually a high number of them, relative to the other minorities, enrolled in law schools.  But, they are still part of the minority count at these schools and yes, still URMs.

Yes, I think. Just like what you just posted is what you THINK.  I don't KNOW why those people said Asians are not really URMs, so I am not going to pretend I do.

I don't use the n word unless you meant negro. Bye.

cooleylawstudent

  • Guest
Re: Dear URMs (from the LSAC)
« Reply #7 on: May 15, 2010, 07:54:09 PM »
Yes, you do Know, you just have your own opinions so far up your own rear that you refuse to accept it.
Here it is einstein, If the ABA says it, its the FACT. They don't care if some racist peeon wants to deny it, its true.
Go back to your flatearth maps and holocaust denials.  ::)


"you think" being the operative part of that.

You're just a racist and you know it, they're all just yellow-n-word's to you ain't they? >:(

Love it! Just recently some idiot on this forum tried telling me that asians weren't URM's.

Frequently Asked Questions
About Racial and Ethnic Status
 Don’t be afraid to dream about going to school—whether it be college or law school. You have as much right to be there as anyone else.

Why am I considered a minority applicant?
Law schools consider your ethnic or racial status to be whatever you indicate on your LSAT registration forms. This factor alone is not a guarantee of admission, but it helps admission committees form a more complete picture of who you are. They are interested in how your individual history has affected your life, including whatever disadvantages you may have overcome.

Is the LSAT biased against minorities?
The passages and questions on the LSAT go through a rigorous screening and pretesting process to make sure that the individual test items are not biased. The primary reason that minority test takers perform less well on the LSAT is lack of preparation. In addition, research indicates that minority group members, particularly African Americans, are more vulnerable to test anxiety than other test takers. The best way to avoid test anxiety is to prepare thoroughly for the LSAT by familiarizing yourself with the types of questions on the test and by taking disclosed (previously administered) tests. Take the entire test—not just a few sections at a time—under actual timed conditions.

more at http://lsac.org/SpecialInterests/minorities-in-legal-education-faq.asp

Those wondering what's considered a URM for law school purposes...I would guess it's the minorities they track, as shown here:

http://lsac.org/SpecialInterests/minorities-in-legal-education-min-enroll.asp


Well, I think what they mean is Asians are the LEAST sought after URMs because there are actually a high number of them, relative to the other minorities, enrolled in law schools.  But, they are still part of the minority count at these schools and yes, still URMs.

Yes, I think. Just like what you just posted is what you THINK.  I don't KNOW why those people said Asians are not really URMs, so I am not going to pretend I do.

I don't use the n word unless you meant negro. Bye.

nealric

  • Global Moderator
  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 2261
  • a.k.a. Miguel Sanchez
    • View Profile
Re: Dear URMs (from the LSAC)
« Reply #8 on: May 15, 2010, 08:17:42 PM »
(-;}: Please stop starting flame wars. I'm tired of locking threads.
Georgetown Law Graduate

Chief justice Earl Warren wasn't a stripper!
Now who's being naive?