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Author Topic: Advice for open book?  (Read 10778 times)

cooleylawstudent

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Re: Advice for open book?
« Reply #20 on: May 05, 2010, 10:03:42 PM »
thats cool, whats its name?

FWIW, my school has a higher bar passage rate than most of the T1's in my state.

the white rabbit

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Re: Advice for open book?
« Reply #21 on: May 06, 2010, 05:30:06 AM »
so baby needs it bottle, that's what you're trying to tell me? :'(

This is what I get for not thinking through my user name.

A better analogy might be using calculators on math tests.  When they're testing you for your ability to do simple arithmetic, it makes no sense to allow them.  If you're doing calculus, it doesn't matter that you have a calculator with you because frankly, everybody at that level has mastered arithmetic to the point where it would just be silly for it to factor into your grade.
Mood: Tired but cheerful.  :)

cooleylawstudent

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Re: Advice for open book?
« Reply #22 on: May 06, 2010, 10:33:21 PM »
first "scientific calculators"(the ones used on said tests) do a HELL of a lot more than you give them credit for(you are either a lier or a fool) second, ....baby needs its bottle?..... :'(

so baby needs it bottle, that's what you're trying to tell me? :'(

This is what I get for not thinking through my user name.

A better analogy might be using calculators on math tests.  When they're testing you for your ability to do simple arithmetic, it makes no sense to allow them.  If you're doing calculus, it doesn't matter that you have a calculator with you because frankly, everybody at that level has mastered arithmetic to the point where it would just be silly for it to factor into your grade.

the white rabbit

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Re: Advice for open book?
« Reply #23 on: May 07, 2010, 12:28:48 AM »
first "scientific calculators"(the ones used on said tests) do a HELL of a lot more than you give them credit for(you are either a lier or a fool) second, ....baby needs its bottle?..... :'(

First, whoever said scientific calculator?  But that's beside the point.  Do you disagree that tests on advanced subjects shouldn't come down to your ability to perform basic tasks?  A calculus test should test your knowledge of calculus and not your arithmetic skills, don't you think?

Second, only if it's tequila.  ;)
Mood: Tired but cheerful.  :)

cooleylawstudent

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Re: Advice for open book?
« Reply #24 on: May 07, 2010, 01:05:32 AM »
my point was you are a retard and too stupid to know what a scientific calulator is and what it does, thanks for proving my point.

first "scientific calculators"(the ones used on said tests) do a HELL of a lot more than you give them credit for(you are either a lier or a fool) second, ....baby needs its bottle?..... :'(

First, whoever said scientific calculator?  But that's beside the point.  Do you disagree that tests on advanced subjects shouldn't come down to your ability to perform basic tasks?  A calculus test should test your knowledge of calculus and not your arithmetic skills, don't you think?

Second, only if it's tequila.  ;)

the white rabbit

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Re: Advice for open book?
« Reply #25 on: May 07, 2010, 05:33:31 AM »
my point was you are a retard and too stupid to know what a scientific calulator is and what it does, thanks for proving my point.

I notice you didn't actually answer my question about whether or not there is a point at which it becomes silly to test for basic skills.  So again, do you disagree that tests on advanced subjects shouldn't come down to your ability to perform basic tasks?  A calculus test should test your knowledge of calculus and not your arithmetic skills, don't you think?
Mood: Tired but cheerful.  :)

cooleylawstudent

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Re: Advice for open book?
« Reply #26 on: May 07, 2010, 07:11:59 PM »
"but...but......you didnt....stop.......I dont care if you did explain it, I want to pretend like you didnt......so yeah!....... ::)

my point was you are a retard and too stupid to know what a scientific calulator is and what it does, thanks for proving my point.

I notice you didn't actually answer my question about whether or not there is a point at which it becomes silly to test for basic skills.  So again, do you disagree that tests on advanced subjects shouldn't come down to your ability to perform basic tasks?  A calculus test should test your knowledge of calculus and not your arithmetic skills, don't you think?

the white rabbit

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Re: Advice for open book?
« Reply #27 on: May 08, 2010, 07:32:54 AM »
"but...but......you didnt....stop.......I dont care if you did explain it, I want to pretend like you didnt......so yeah!....... ::)

my point was you are a retard and too stupid to know what a scientific calulator is and what it does, thanks for proving my point.

I notice you didn't actually answer my question about whether or not there is a point at which it becomes silly to test for basic skills.  So again, do you disagree that tests on advanced subjects shouldn't come down to your ability to perform basic tasks?  A calculus test should test your knowledge of calculus and not your arithmetic skills, don't you think?

Still evading.  I ask a question that requires a simple yes or no: do you disagree that tests on advanced subjects shouldn't come down to your ability to perform basic tasks?
Mood: Tired but cheerful.  :)

cooleylawstudent

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Re: Advice for open book?
« Reply #28 on: May 08, 2010, 04:43:42 PM »
should they be graded on if you are smart, yeah. Should you need a reacharound while doing it, no.

There an answer and a bonus, "but....but....... :'("

MCB

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Re: Advice for open book?
« Reply #29 on: May 08, 2010, 11:39:02 PM »
As for the other issue, no bunnies you don't know the question, but thats the easy part. The issue is having the elements and the laws memorised,

Actually, the memorization is considered the easy part at the top schools, which is why they don't bother testing you on your ability to memorize.  Hence, open-book.  (Frankly, it doesn't make much difference anyway because you end up memorizing most of the stuff just by creating outlines or other study materials.  If you're actually looking for the answer to a legal question during the exam, something's gone terribly wrong.)

I agree with this.  I find the open book exams to be much more challenging, at least to ace.  This is because you basically get no credit for the strict memorization you've done (the easy part of what you're doing when you're studying in law school!).  The grades are given based on a curve as everyone here knows, and if all the students have an outline giving them black letter answers, then essentially the entire significant part of your exam grade turns on the depth and quality of your analysis.  

I never get how students seem relieved when they find out that an exam will be open note/open book.  Maybe if you were the ONLY one allowed to have notes, then it would help you.  But since everyone has them, we all just end up canceling each other out on the easiest parts!  I was talking to a fellow student about this exact thing earlier today, and we theorized that professors like to go open note because the overall quality of exam probably goes up.  Which of course, doesn't benefit students so much as it benefits them.   :-\  I doubt it has much to do with not wanting to stress us out.
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