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Author Topic: How to approach the next lsat?  (Read 1507 times)

sonofapickle

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Re: How to approach the next lsat?
« Reply #10 on: May 20, 2010, 12:04:22 AM »
I am no expert or anything. But, it could probably mean that your analytical ability is not strong. I remember scoring a 147 on my first cold test, but I studied and after my second test I scored a 160. I was so elated by that I became a little haughty which is why I remember it. After a few more periods of studying, I consecutively score in the 170s range. That means nothing in terms of actually taking the real LSAT though, so I will approach it with care once I take it in the fall. Some lawyers who lack in analytical ability tend to use their rhetorical skills more to make up for it from what I have observed. Some peoples strengths lie in different areas (positive psychology). Know what you are good at and what you lack in.

cooleylawstudent

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Re: How to approach the next lsat?
« Reply #11 on: May 20, 2010, 12:59:02 AM »
It sounds to me like you are retaking the same practice test. Yeah, no excuse for not having a 180 really.

bigs5068

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Re: How to approach the next lsat?
« Reply #12 on: May 20, 2010, 02:21:42 AM »
I got 168 on a PRACTICE LSAT once and a 166, but the majority of times I scored between 153-157 at the end of the day I imagine people who take the REAL tests scores don't differ that much. 

Practice is practice I mean in BarBri I got 20 out of 20 MC questions right one time, but that means jack when it comes to finals still waiting for my grades for second semester. If I got 10 out of 20 on the final I can't go tell my professor now I got 20 out of 20 on a BarBri book once so I deserve an A. At the end of the day practice is practice it is helpful, but the real results are what matter.

Maybe you have really improved a lot and if so that is awesome I would have loved to get a 170 and I wish you the best of luck when you take it. At the end of the day though the only way to really know what you are going to do is take the real LSAT. Then when you get to law school you will have to take the REAL FINALS after numerous practice ones. Then I imagine you take full practice bar exams, not quite at that point yet, but again you could nail everything in practice, the real results are what matters. Honestly, good luck to you I sincerely hope you get a 170, but always remember practice is practice and nobody really cares how you do on a practice test, a basketball practice, practice SAT, practice/mock interview, etc. It is always important to practice, but the results you get in practice mean nothing at the end of the day.

sonofapickle

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Re: How to approach the next lsat?
« Reply #13 on: May 20, 2010, 03:37:48 PM »
I never believed in luck. I only know of hard work and talent.

The results I get in practice do mean something at the end of the day. Practice is meant to polish and become better at certain skill areas. For example, if a boy was bad at shooting in the field of basketball and scored only 20% of the time, and kept practicing and a few months later was scoring 40% of the time in the field, he has improved obviously. Place him in a game his field goal percentage would possibly decrease because of other variables but not back at 20%, possibly 25-36 percent of the time in the field. The test is different though as there aren't many different variable like other players, exhaustion, sight, and concentration. If more of your practice tests are based on actual questions from previous LSAT tests, then your percentage of scoring higher on the actual test increases. The variables I have are an endless amount of paper and extended time placed on certain sections. You take those two options out, my score will probably go down a little, but not by much. The practice tests do mean something at the end of the day. Do not discount them as mere elementary tests. The practice tests mean nothing in terms of taking a real LSAT as there are multiple variables to consider that I do not consider when taking a practice test. However, that does not mean my score will drop dramatically.

bigs5068

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Re: How to approach the next lsat?
« Reply #14 on: May 20, 2010, 06:14:36 PM »
Alright I am not saying you won't do good I hope you do great.  The real LSAT is not the same as a practice though, your practice results are somewhat of an indicator you may get a 180 and that would be awesome I hope you get that. On the other hand you might get a 140 there is really no way to know until you take the real test.  It sounds like you are putting in the work and it should work out, but there is just no way to know until you do it. Best of luck to you.

legalized

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Re: How to approach the next lsat?
« Reply #15 on: May 22, 2010, 11:59:15 AM »
Hello LSD org members--I have a very unfortunate situation before me.

I have in the past cancelled the lsat scores 2x (the 1st time was just to experience the testing environment with out studying for it), have taken this past Dec's test, scored poorly on that test and now have 1 more chance to take the test.

I just took a test and scored a 157. However, I have taken all of the tests except for Sept 09.

I was wondering with 1 more chance left should I just bust my butt to take June's or take it this coming Oct? Also if I do take it in october I dont know the best way to study incrementally for Oct's test?

Any suggestions--also would I still have a chance at getting accepted to schools with this history? Thank you and I will definitely appreciate all harsh and critical honest answers

What EarlCat said.

And as far as will schools still take you...they may ask about it.  You don't seem to have any good reason for the 2 cancels so don't bother making an addendum. 

cooleylawstudent

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Re: How to approach the next lsat?
« Reply #16 on: May 22, 2010, 05:29:29 PM »
yeah, it means that you practiced. The participation award of life.  ::)

I never believed in luck. I only know of hard work and talent.

The results I get in practice do mean something at the end of the day. Practice is meant to polish and become better at certain skill areas. For example, if a boy was bad at shooting in the field of basketball and scored only 20% of the time, and kept practicing and a few months later was scoring 40% of the time in the field, he has improved obviously. Place him in a game his field goal percentage would possibly decrease because of other variables but not back at 20%, possibly 25-36 percent of the time in the field. The test is different though as there aren't many different variable like other players, exhaustion, sight, and concentration. If more of your practice tests are based on actual questions from previous LSAT tests, then your percentage of scoring higher on the actual test increases. The variables I have are an endless amount of paper and extended time placed on certain sections. You take those two options out, my score will probably go down a little, but not by much. The practice tests do mean something at the end of the day. Do not discount them as mere elementary tests. The practice tests mean nothing in terms of taking a real LSAT as there are multiple variables to consider that I do not consider when taking a practice test. However, that does not mean my score will drop dramatically.