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Author Topic: Massachusetts School of Law at Andover  (Read 8163 times)

lawschlgirl

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Massachusetts School of Law at Andover
« on: April 25, 2010, 07:19:31 PM »
OK, so here's the dilema. Living in Maine, limited income, do I go to Mass Law or not?  It seems to have a great reputation, however; the ABA accreditation is bugging me. We all have to pass the same bar exam, so does the "name brand" school make that much of a difference?

Thanks!

mbw

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Re: Massachusetts School of Law at Andover
« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2010, 11:11:49 PM »
If you want to work in Maine (and aren't coming from a national or Boston tier one school), then go to Maine Law.  Do not go to a non-ABA-accredited school if you want to work anywhere but Mass (and you don't have employment already lined up.)  The only school I would waive that objection to is the new UMass Law.

I'm in a lynch mob?  I had no idea.  This is really worrying; I really don't have time for another extra-curricular activity.

space for rent.

cooleylawstudent

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Re: Massachusetts School of Law at Andover
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2010, 12:16:38 AM »
You'll make a lot loss if you go there since you won't be able to take clients that live or do business even an inch over the state line, plus if a bigfirm out of state offers you a good gig you'd be unable to take it, and if (for personal reasons or other) you do have to move out of state you'd end up as a paralegal at best. If you're ok with that then go for it. If its you only option go for it. If no to either of those, then don't.

kathrynjones

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Re: Massachusetts School of Law at Andover
« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2010, 11:29:58 AM »
Hi Lawschlgirl,

I work for MSL as well as our new sister school The American College of History and Legal Studies.  We are honored that you are considering MSL, and I do want to correct some of the misconceptions of the two prior commenters.

MSLaw students can in fact practice law in a number of states. MSLAW students are eligible to take the Bar immediately upon graduation in Massachusetts and in Connecticut. After passing Massachusetts they are immediately eligible to take the bar exam in New Hampshire, Maine, Vermont, Wisconsin, California, West Virginia and Maryland. In addition, there are a number of jurisdictions where MSLAW graduates are eligible to take the bar after practicing for a prescribed period of time. These include:

Alabama: By petition to the Alabama Supreme Court
Alaska: 5 years
Arizona: 5 years
California: Immediately after passing bar of primary jurisdiction
Colorado: 5 Years
Connecticut: Immediately
Florida: 10 Years
Hawaii: 5 Years
Kentucky: 3 Years
Maine: Immediately after passing bar of primary jurisdiction
Maryland: MSLAW students have received individual permission after admission in MA Massachusetts Immediately
Missouri: 5 Years
Nevada: By individual petition to the “Substantially equivalent committee”
New Hampshire: Immediately after passing bar of primary jurisdiction
New Mexico: 4 Years
New York: 5 Years
Oregon: 3 Years
Pennsylvania: 5 Years
Rhode Island: 5 Years
Texas: 3 Years
Vermont: Immediately
Washington: 3 Years
West Virginia: Immediately after passing bar of primary jurisdiction
Wisconsin: Immediately after passing bar of primary jurisdiction

We are very proud of our record, including our recent victories in the regional competitions of national trial advocacy competitions (our team went to the national finals in the Thurgood Marshall Trial Advocacy Competition, having been beaten regionally only by Harvard, and will also went to the National Finals of the AAJ Trial competition, having beaten Syracuse and Roger Williams).

I hope you won't hesitate to contact our admissions office if you have any further concerns.  We would be honored to speak with you.  We can be reached at 978.681.0800 ext. 148

best,
Kathryn Jones
Manager of New Media
Massachusetts School of Law
American College of History and Legal Studies

cooleylawstudent

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Re: Massachusetts School of Law at Andover
« Reply #4 on: April 27, 2010, 01:55:42 PM »
The real question is why not even "provisional" ABA approval yet? You've been in business long enough to at least apply.




Hi Lawschlgirl,

I work for MSL as well as our new sister school The American College of History and Legal Studies.  We are honored that you are considering MSL, and I do want to correct some of the misconceptions of the two prior commenters.

MSLaw students can in fact practice law in a number of states. MSLAW students are eligible to take the Bar immediately upon graduation in Massachusetts and in Connecticut. After passing Massachusetts they are immediately eligible to take the bar exam in New Hampshire, Maine, Vermont, Wisconsin, California, West Virginia and Maryland. In addition, there are a number of jurisdictions where MSLAW graduates are eligible to take the bar after practicing for a prescribed period of time. These include:

Alabama: By petition to the Alabama Supreme Court
Alaska: 5 years
Arizona: 5 years
California: Immediately after passing bar of primary jurisdiction
Colorado: 5 Years
Connecticut: Immediately
Florida: 10 Years
Hawaii: 5 Years
Kentucky: 3 Years
Maine: Immediately after passing bar of primary jurisdiction
Maryland: MSLAW students have received individual permission after admission in MA Massachusetts Immediately
Missouri: 5 Years
Nevada: By individual petition to the “Substantially equivalent committee”
New Hampshire: Immediately after passing bar of primary jurisdiction
New Mexico: 4 Years
New York: 5 Years
Oregon: 3 Years
Pennsylvania: 5 Years
Rhode Island: 5 Years
Texas: 3 Years
Vermont: Immediately
Washington: 3 Years
West Virginia: Immediately after passing bar of primary jurisdiction
Wisconsin: Immediately after passing bar of primary jurisdiction

We are very proud of our record, including our recent victories in the regional competitions of national trial advocacy competitions (our team went to the national finals in the Thurgood Marshall Trial Advocacy Competition, having been beaten regionally only by Harvard, and will also went to the National Finals of the AAJ Trial competition, having beaten Syracuse and Roger Williams).

I hope you won't hesitate to contact our admissions office if you have any further concerns.  We would be honored to speak with you.  We can be reached at 978.681.0800 ext. 148

best,
Kathryn Jones
Manager of New Media
Massachusetts School of Law
American College of History and Legal Studies

kathrynjones

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Re: Massachusetts School of Law at Andover
« Reply #5 on: April 27, 2010, 08:48:53 PM »
HI (-;}

From the start, MSL's pioneering mission has been to inexpensively provide rigorous legal education and social mobility to all students, including working class students, members of minorities and immigrants, all of whom traditionally would have been excluded from earning a law degree.  As such our tuition is only about 35 percent of the median for New England Law Schools and has barely increased over the twenty year history of our school.  While MSL has stayed true to our mission from day one, our mission is not compatible with ABA accreditation whose policies force schools to pay higher and  higher salaries, build expensive, hardcover libraries which are  no longer necessary in the age of the internet, restrict the number of hours a professor can teach and require incoming law students to take the LSAT.  None of these policies do anything to enrich the student's learning but do a great deal to increase the cost of a law school education and restrict minorities from earning a law degree.

MSL does not seek, and will not seek ABA accreditation. Doing so would force us to double our tuition while providing no increase in value for our students.  We are however accredited by the New England Association of Colleges, the same regional body that accredits Yale, Harvard, and Suffolk.

best,

Kathryn

cooleylawstudent

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Re: Massachusetts School of Law at Andover
« Reply #6 on: April 27, 2010, 09:11:44 PM »
So the students can get full finaid?

mbw

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Re: Massachusetts School of Law at Andover
« Reply #7 on: April 28, 2010, 12:02:37 AM »
HI (-;}

From the start, MSL's pioneering mission has been to inexpensively provide rigorous legal education and social mobility to all students, including working class students, members of minorities and immigrants, all of whom traditionally would have been excluded from earning a law degree. 

Hmmm... I'm a minority (actually a URM) and am paying less than 50K for my legal education at an ABA-accredited school.  Is tuition at your non-accredited school cost less than this?  And what is the employment rate for your graduates? (And average salary at 9 months)
I'm in a lynch mob?  I had no idea.  This is really worrying; I really don't have time for another extra-curricular activity.

space for rent.

cooleylawstudent

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Re: Massachusetts School of Law at Andover
« Reply #8 on: April 28, 2010, 12:11:32 AM »
For tuition, just go to their website, are you that lazy? Lifes not a lawschool exam you know, sometimes it actually takes a wee bit of effort and just the theory of it.  :'(

Thane Messinger

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Re: Massachusetts School of Law at Andover
« Reply #9 on: May 05, 2010, 03:41:57 AM »
OK, so here's the dilema. Living in Maine, limited income, do I go to Mass Law or not?  It seems to have a great reputation, however; the ABA accreditation is bugging me. We all have to pass the same bar exam, so does the "name brand" school make that much of a difference?

Yes, it can.  

Kathryn is quite right in her points, and good for MSL to have her here to correct misimpressions.  Having visited MSL and spoken with its dean while I was in Boston on business, I'll say that there are many aspects of MSL that are quite impressive.  It has however taken a rather combative stance against the ABA, which, depending upon your view, is either valiant or foolhearty.  

MSL does offer an excellent education for FAR less than other schools charge.  In many ways, it is proof of how law schools might be.  And MSL makes some powerful points vis-a-vis the law school industry.  That written, you should consider seriously what it is you want from the education and degree.  (Your statement about its "great reputation" needs a serious qualifier; it depends upon whom you're talking with.)  Review MSL's site and visit the school.  (Not too far from Maine.)  Talk with current students--and especially 3Ls.  You'll be impressed, and you'll also get a sense of what you're getting into.

Hope that gave you a fair and balanced report.