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Author Topic: Pace v. New England Law Boston  (Read 1885 times)

tangerinefields

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Pace v. New England Law Boston
« on: April 21, 2010, 08:42:25 PM »
Where would you go...Pace (full price) or New England Law Boston (15k scholarship as long as I maintain a 2.5 GPA)? Originally from New York area, so New England would mean relocating. Also, not interested in a Big Law job. Thanks.

Mr. Hart

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Re: Pace v. New England Law Boston
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2010, 09:28:21 PM »
Where would you rather work?

Ninja1

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Re: Pace v. New England Law Boston
« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2010, 10:02:09 AM »
Are you tied to living in the New England region?

Pace if you have to pick one. Check the curve on your NESL scholarship, but I bet a 2.5 is hard to maintain at a place that kicks out so many people for academics.
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tangerinefields

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Re: Pace v. New England Law Boston
« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2010, 01:30:17 PM »
I'd rather work in New York, but then again, I've yet to visit Boston. I hear it's an incredible city. How could I check the curve on the NESL scholarship? Why is NESL a place that kicks out so many people for academics? If NESL kicks students out for doing poorly, wouldn't that make my 2.5 easier to maintain?


CJScalia

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Re: Pace v. New England Law Boston
« Reply #4 on: April 23, 2010, 04:23:27 AM »
I'd say Pace, but keep in mind that cost of living is also going to be higher in NY than it is in Boston.
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Ninja1

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Re: Pace v. New England Law Boston
« Reply #5 on: May 07, 2010, 02:00:04 PM »
I'd rather work in New York, but then again, I've yet to visit Boston. I hear it's an incredible city. How could I check the curve on the NESL scholarship? Why is NESL a place that kicks out so many people for academics? If NESL kicks students out for doing poorly, wouldn't that make my 2.5 easier to maintain?



Call the school and ask what their curve is if you can't find it online. I bet it hits right around a 2.4 - 2.5 being median.

NESL presumptively kicks out a bunch of people on the front end so they don't end up graduating, taking the bar, failing, and harming the school's passage rate on the back end. When 25% of the entering students have a 2.9/150 or less, it's obvious that a number of them simply won't be able to pass the bar no matter what the school does. As a result, drastic measures must be taken at some level, and making the entire 1L class sink or swim right out the gate (and continue swimming for a few years) is a pretty easy way for the school to go about getting rid of the bad students while panning for gold. This is a common T3/4 tactic.

The fact that they kick a number of people out won't make it easier to maintain your scholarship, it will just make it easier for you to lose your scholarship and get kicked out yourself. Remember, the first semester (and to a lesser extent, the first year), you'll have something of a built in airbag of bodies underneath your grades, an airbag that will be heavily depleted after December and more or less gone after 1L. Every time you have a poor performing classmate leave, you fall one rung down the grading curve ladder, unless you're already below them or you're at the very top of the class. Even if you're not the guy that's eating the Ds and Fs left behind by the fallen, you may well be the victim of a collapsing floor that sees your previous median-worthy performance devalued. What you actually want is for people above you (and yourself) to transfer out.

Finally, and I'm not saying that NESL does or doesn't do this, just that it happens and it tends to happen more at lower ranked schools based on what I've personally heard, some schools will lump most or all of the scholarship recipients into one section, which will necessarily cause a large percentage of them to lose their scholarships. Again, I have no idea if NESL does this, and by default I'd assume that they don't, but approach with caution all the same.

When I asked if you were tied to the New England region, I meant it more in terms of "how do you feel about The South?"
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tangerinefields

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Re: Pace v. New England Law Boston
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2010, 02:25:54 PM »
Well articulated. Thank you Mr. Ninja.

BikePilot

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Re: Pace v. New England Law Boston
« Reply #7 on: May 23, 2010, 04:20:31 PM »
Boston is a pretty awesome city (as far as cities go - I'd rather be in the mountains).  NESL has quite a nice building in a great area of the city.  I don't know anything about the academics of either school.
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