Law School Discussion

Question Test #9 (Oct 93), Section 2 #23

Question Test #9 (Oct 93), Section 2 #23
« on: April 13, 2010, 09:15:10 PM »
This question is about a poor farmer giving several criteria to his children about poor, rich, honest, and dishonest people.  I understand that we have to create rules "if not rich then poor," "If not dishonest, then honest," etc.  But how should I proceed from here.  The contrapositive of the correct answer (A) makes sense, but how would I do this problem without first looking at the answer choices?

Thanks a lot,

cooleylawstudent

Re: Question Test #9 (Oct 93), Section 2 #23
« Reply #1 on: April 13, 2010, 09:54:42 PM »
Guy asks the doctor, "how do I make my arm stop hurting when I bend it?" Doctor says "stop bending it"

Here's the answer, ALWAYS look at multiple choice options. Thats how you know what to pick from. Remember you dont have one perfect and three or four wrong, you have the "most right" and "most wrong" it's not the same as undergrad multiple choice and I'm told its good practice for the bar which is largely the same way. Do MC as MC and essay as essay, don't try to make it harder by doing each backwards.


This question is about a poor farmer giving several criteria to his children about poor, rich, honest, and dishonest people.  I understand that we have to create rules "if not rich then poor," "If not dishonest, then honest," etc.  But how should I proceed from here.  The contrapositive of the correct answer (A) makes sense, but how would I do this problem without first looking at the answer choices?

Thanks a lot,

Re: Question Test #9 (Oct 93), Section 2 #23
« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2010, 01:47:19 PM »
Guy asks the doctor, "how do I make my arm stop hurting when I bend it?" Doctor says "stop bending it"

Here's the answer, ALWAYS look at multiple choice options. Thats how you know what to pick from. Remember you dont have one perfect and three or four wrong, you have the "most right" and "most wrong" it's not the same as undergrad multiple choice and I'm told its good practice for the bar which is largely the same way. Do MC as MC and essay as essay, don't try to make it harder by doing each backwards.


This question is about a poor farmer giving several criteria to his children about poor, rich, honest, and dishonest people.  I understand that we have to create rules "if not rich then poor," "If not dishonest, then honest," etc.  But how should I proceed from here.  The contrapositive of the correct answer (A) makes sense, but how would I do this problem without first looking at the answer choices?

Thanks a lot,

Your response is a classical circular reasoning!  ;D

OP, post the original question or send it to me through the forum. People will be able to help you out easier. From your post it seems like you are wanting to know how to prephrase before moving on to the answer choices. This is the absolute best method for attacking "most" problems. Hard to say without knowing the full question.

Re: Question Test #9 (Oct 93), Section 2 #23
« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2010, 08:46:49 PM »
We are told in the question, that in this world you are either rich or poor, and that all poor farmers are honest, so that all rich farmers must be dishonest. The flaw here is that even if it's true that in the world you are either rich or poor, and that all poor farmers are honest, it still might be true that some or all rich farmers are also honest.  If choice A, however, is taken as true, so that every honest farmer is poor, then it's no longer a possibility that some or all rich farmers are honest (honesty requires being poor), and the conclusion of the passage can be properly drawn.

Re: Question Test #9 (Oct 93), Section 2 #23
« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2010, 07:59:35 PM »
Really appreciated the help.  Exactly what I was looking for