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Author Topic: After completing LL. B course, can anyone start practicing as a lawyer?  (Read 2523 times)

mnhtapu

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Is it possible that after finishing LL. B, anybody can start practicing as a lawyer? I mean if he doesn't enroll in his native country's bar association, can he still practice? In case that is possible, does it mean that he acts as a solicitor not a barrister who can appear at court for argument?

cooleylawstudent

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In America they're just both called lawyers. What the difference anyways?
Here we have a JD.


Is it possible that after finishing LL. B, anybody can start practicing as a lawyer? I mean if he doesn't enroll in his native country's bar association, can he still practice? In case that is possible, does it mean that he acts as a solicitor not a barrister who can appear at court for argument?

Freak

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It depends on the State, but regardless the LLB holder still must pass the BAR exam.
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BikePilot

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In the US, you must be bar certified in the state in which you wish to practice.  Almost no states allow sitting for the bar without a JD (or if you have an LLB from a different country, an LLM), those that do tend to make it nearly impossible as a practical matter.  Most US law schools offer an LLM for foreign students with undergraduate law degrees who wish to practice in the US. 

Each country will have a different scheme so proceeding with this question without knowing the jurisdiction is a bit silly.  I'm guessing you are in the UK or some colony that still respects the Crown to some degree.

As noted, the US doesn't have the barrister/solicitor distinction. 

BTW a JD is a 3-year graduate degree (technically a doctorate, but there's no dissertation so its more like a really intense masters in practice) that you can't start until you've completed a 4-year bachelors degree. An LLM is a 1-year masters degree that is ordinarily taken after receiving a law degree in a different country (and at some schools serves as a means for US JDs to specialize in a particular field).  An SJD is like  PhD (classes + dissertation) but for Law, it is a US degree aimed almost exclusively at foreign legal academics (US legal academics need only a JD).

In many other countries a Law degree is an undergraduate degree (4 or 5 years I think) and no graduate degree is required to practice.
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interrex

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Re: After completing LL. B course, can anyone start practicing as a lawyer?
« Reply #4 on: December 22, 2010, 11:40:39 AM »
so why do we americans make people get a freakin' phd? Is it because we are just that more intelligent or do you think its a bunch of rich white guys trying to make it harder for anyone who isn't one of them(or something they consider "one of the good ones") to get into their precious little club?

BikePilot

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Re: After completing LL. B course, can anyone start practicing as a lawyer?
« Reply #5 on: December 23, 2010, 11:30:14 AM »
A JD is very much NOT a PhD.  The rough legal equivalent of a PhD  is an SJD.  All the SJD's I know personally were foreign and needed it for whatever they wanted to do (usually teach law). 
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interrex

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Re: After completing LL. B course, can anyone start practicing as a lawyer?
« Reply #6 on: December 23, 2010, 11:35:22 AM »
fine, if you want to go with the terminal degree view that even though all PHD=doctor not all doctor=phd.

That being said, it is a doctor degree(Jurious Doctor) so viewing it that way instead, why do you think that America makes us get a DOCTOR degree when other nations don't?

A JD is very much NOT a PhD.  The rough legal equivalent of a PhD  is an SJD.  All the SJD's I know personally were foreign and needed it for whatever they wanted to do (usually teach law).