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Author Topic: IP law at Franklin Pierce v NYLS  (Read 1048 times)

GirlBeck

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IP law at Franklin Pierce v NYLS
« on: March 27, 2010, 09:42:15 AM »
I am deciding between NYLS and Franklin Pierce, specifically looking at each school for their respective IP programs. I like the Institute for Information Law and Policy at NYLS, but Franklin Pierce has a top-ranked IP program. Any advice?

rene_descartes

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Re: IP law at Franklin Pierce v NYLS
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2010, 09:55:00 PM »
I think FP. You know that FP is merging with UNH.

spencerculp

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Re: IP law at Franklin Pierce v NYLS
« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2010, 05:19:42 PM »
I'm currently an FP student, so I am of course biased, but if you are really intent on IP track, see what each school has to back up their claims of IP prowess.
Several law schools I considered also offered IP tracks, but most of them beefed up their program images by using lots of adjuncts or non-IP faculty; listing dozens of courses that were rarely offered; and combining distinct IP subjects into one course. One school, for instance, combined patent law with patent drafting; after personally taking a patent law only class, I know you'd be hard pressed to get any sort of depth by combining it with drafting.

I can't really comment on NYLS, but FP has 12 full time faculty in its IP program; it offers foundational IP courses like patents, trademarks, and copyrights every semester; and has three IP clinics that run practically year round (fall and spring plus summer term). I think you'll find the opposite problem at FP compared to many schools; there are so many IP courses offered here so often you have a hard time taking everything you're interested in. Plus, the professors in other subjects are acutely aware of the IP interest and incorporate it into their lesson plans.

If this sounds too much like cheerleading, sorry. Bottom line, if you dig a little bit, you'll find out that all IP programs are not created equal. Just check out their full time IP faculty levels, number of courses offered every semester or every other semester, and opportunities outside the normal classroom like externships and clinics. If you have any more in depth questions, email me at jculp@piercelaw.edu.

GirlBeck

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Re: IP law at Franklin Pierce v NYLS
« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2010, 02:55:24 PM »
Thanks! This is really helpful!