Law School Discussion

Canadian student trying for American Law School

Re: Canadian student trying for American Law School
« Reply #10 on: March 25, 2010, 07:02:54 PM »
I agree with the above poster. With your numbers, you might be qualified for a T2 school somewhere. If you are insistent, transfer after your first year to a T1 school.  but it all depends on if you want to stay in the U.S.

Right now, the legal market is very very bad in the U.S.   

cooleylawstudent

Re: Canadian student trying for American Law School
« Reply #11 on: March 25, 2010, 09:15:49 PM »
Yeah, clubbing baby seals much better work....... ::)



Some bad advice going around here.  Do not, under any circumstances, come to the US as a non-citizen and spend $100,000 on a 4th tier regional law degree.  You're going to put yourself in an incredibly difficult situation wherein you can't secure a legal position in the US, your OPT time is running out, and you can't get into an LLM program in Canada (not to mention the additional steps you'd have to take to practice there).  

With the numbers you're sitting on, my best advice would be to continue taking the LSAT till you can bring your score up to 160ish+ and have a shot at getting into one of the lower-rung Canadian law schools like Windsor.  Then if by some miracle you're a spectacular student and really want to practice in the US you can later get an LLM from a T-20 US school.  

If you can't push your LSAT over 160 and you've got a sub 3.0 undergrad GPA, you might want to strongly reconsider a career in law (unless of course there are some confounding factors you've omitted). 

nerfco

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Re: Canadian student trying for American Law School
« Reply #12 on: March 25, 2010, 10:43:38 PM »
I believe both rene_descartes and MorningStar are largely correct.

For what its worth, the OPT bit only applies if you are on an F-1. If you are on a J-1, you will be doing AT instead, which lasts a little longer. I'm also not entirely sure about the "second-class citizen" bit, as I don't know of many jobs that you are shut out from as a Canadian (there are some government jobs, but you can still clerk and do a lot of DOJ Honors jobs, for example).

But, you are definitely better off spending a year upping your LSAT and re-applying to Canadian schools than applying to T4 US schools.