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Author Topic: I don't like writing papers... Should I not even consider law?  (Read 2369 times)

MCB

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Re: I don't like writing papers... Should I not even consider law?
« Reply #10 on: March 20, 2010, 12:15:10 PM »
I agree with most of what's been said in this thread, but I'd like to add one additional point that sprung to mind as I was reading the original post.

Writing on forums like this also entails a key aspect that doesn't apply to humanities-type papers nor legal writing; it's totally voluntary.  You aren't being graded and there aren't any formulas you have to follow or topics selected for you.  For me, the inherent pressure of any assigned writing is what sucks some fun out of writing.  Internet forums are inherently going to be a different exercise altogether than anything you're doing for school, or even for a client, in terms of style, time, and content pressures.  So yeah, I don't know if you can use a like for posting online as any kind of basis for a talent in legal writing.  
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Thane Messinger

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Re: I don't like writing papers... Should I not even consider law?
« Reply #11 on: March 27, 2010, 04:04:33 PM »
I agree with most of what's been said in this thread, but I'd like to add one additional point that sprung to mind as I was reading the original post.

Writing on forums like this also entails a key aspect that doesn't apply to humanities-type papers nor legal writing; it's totally voluntary.  You aren't being graded and there aren't any formulas you have to follow or topics selected for you.  For me, the inherent pressure of any assigned writing is what sucks some fun out of writing.  Internet forums are inherently going to be a different exercise altogether than anything you're doing for school, or even for a client, in terms of style, time, and content pressures.  So yeah, I don't know if you can use a like for posting online as any kind of basis for a talent in legal writing.  


A fair point.  Have to say again, to anyone who's remotely curious about what legal writing is all about: read Lund's Jagged Rocks of Wisdom--The Memo: Mastering the Legal Memorandum.  That will give you a clue not only to legal writing (for those in law school about to embark on a clerkship or new job), but also the expectations among partners (i.e., your multiple bosses) and firms.  I consider Lund a friend, but I'm also serious about the value of what he says.  I read his work, and was stunned that it was not available to me, those many years ago.  His two books ought to be required reading in law school.  (Mine too.  = :  ) 

It's one thing to do well in college and law school; it's another entirely to be prepared for the world of the law office.  Much of success is not chance, or luck, but wise behavior.  This is not about sacrificing oneself--lawyers can be some of the most interesting, caring people you'll ever meet--but it is about being prepared.  Read these and you'll be much farther along, and much more likely to succeed.  And for those asking whether this is the right path, read these and you'll know.

Sheshe

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Re: I don't like writing papers... Should I not even consider law?
« Reply #12 on: March 27, 2010, 06:38:29 PM »
This is probably somewhat irrelevant, but I completely understand how you feel about the english and philosophy papers.  I had this 1 english professor early on in my undergraduate career who always wanted us to look beyond the text to further analyze the author's purpose. I know it dosen't sound so bad, but he once spent 2 whole class periods explaining why some fictional character in a novel had to be homosexual, eventhough in a candid interview the author denied it.  What the hell? I would much rather write about things grounded in facts or evidence, not that ridiculous bull! So that was my experience with both philosophy and english. I hate them both passionately!
A democracy is nothing more than mob rule, where fifty-one percent of the people may take away the rights of the other forty-nine.

~Thomas Jefferson~