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Author Topic: Taking A Year Off?  (Read 559 times)

kmattio

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Taking A Year Off?
« on: February 21, 2010, 09:52:06 PM »
Hi all, I'm new to this board. I scrolled through a couple pages looking to see if anyone had already started a thread about this but couldn't find a recent one...so my apologies if this is a repeat!

Anyway, I'm currently a junior seriously considering law school. However, I've been told by many people that heading straight to law school after graduating is not the best idea. I admit that I'm already a little burnt out from undergrad, but I'm worried that law schools will look down on this "year off". I wouldn't be sitting around doing nothing - I have a full-time paralegal job lined up at the district attorney's office.

Has anyone taken or known someone has taken this approach that could offer a little guidance?

Thanks!

Remarq

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Re: Taking A Year Off?
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2010, 10:56:03 PM »
Most people take at least a year off. If anything, working in a legal setting will increase your chance of acceptance [if it has any affect at all] and help you in the job search.

BikePilot

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Re: Taking A Year Off?
« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2010, 08:02:58 AM »
I'd guess that about half the people at my school went straight though.  Few if any took a year off though - rather they went and did something, usually something quite impressive/challenging/useful. I don't think law schools care in the slightest.  IF you do something particularly impressive it might improve your chances, but short of getting yourself arrested I don't think you'll hurt your chances by doing something other than school for a year. The paralegal job will probably have no affect on law school acceptance, but it may help you be slightly more competitive once you are at law school - you'll have a head start on how to do legal research, bluebook and that sort of thing.  You'll hopefully also start to develop a professional network which can be extremely useful when it comes time to seek legal employment.
HLS 2010