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Author Topic: A Letter to my classmates  (Read 5383 times)

Lillian_2

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A Letter to my classmates
« on: February 09, 2010, 12:03:24 AM »
I've seen a few people share observations about their schools, so here's mine.....

Dear professor A: Please stop posing important questions, allowing morons to participate, and then never providing the actual answer.  My outline currently consists of half finished statements

Dear Guy who leans back in his chair with his arms crossed and answers everyone question like he's the most authoritative person alive: You're in the bottom half of our class, so shut the f**k up.  All you need is a monocle for your a-hole ensemble to be complete.

Dear girl who answers every obvious question: Believe it or not, we all thought of the answer 5 minutes ago but it was too obvious to say out loud.  Please stop looking around the classroom like you blew our f**king minds.

Dear coffee breath:  I know you're tired, but I'm tired too.  Please stop drinking 10 cups of coffee and then trying to talk to me at close range. It smells like you just ate a dirty diaper.  Switch to iced tea or try brushing your teeth.

Dear ivy-league undergrad kid: It's really great that you went to Harvard and wear your Harvard *&^% everyday to remind everyone that you went to Harvard, but no one f**king gives a *&^%.  Why don't you spend less time talking about Harvard and more time not placing in the bottom half of the class?

Dear parents who bring their kids to school with pink eye:  It's f**king disgusting, so please stop giving me dirty looks when you overhear me telling our other classmates how f**king disgusting it is.

Dear girl who raises her hand 1 minute after class should have ended:  Seriously stop, or I'm going to bring rotten fruit to class and throw it at you.

Dear mooch who sits around and whines about work but never actually does any: No, you can't have my outlines, research, notes, or anything else I spent hours slaving over while you got drunk. 

Dear girl who acted like she was better than everyone all last semester but failed to makes honors: This theoretically should have humbled you, so why are you still acting like a female dog to everyone?





cooleylawstudent

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Re: A Letter to my classmates
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2010, 12:52:53 AM »
Congradulations, it sounds like you hate everyone and I just bet they all feel the same way right back.  :-X

nealric

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Re: A Letter to my classmates
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2010, 05:20:29 PM »
Quote

Dear professor A: Please stop posing important questions, allowing morons to participate, and then never providing the actual answer.  My outline currently consists of half finished statements

Use hornbooks to make your outline. Problem solved.
Georgetown Law Graduate

Chief justice Earl Warren wasn't a stripper!
Now who's being naive?

StonewallJacksonFan

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Re: A Letter to my classmates
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2010, 07:20:04 PM »
what is a hornbook? would class notes and reading the required textbook and required cases several times be enough for to do well in a 1L class?

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Re: A Letter to my classmates
« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2010, 07:48:39 PM »
You sound like a real gem.

jack24

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Re: A Letter to my classmates
« Reply #5 on: February 10, 2010, 03:33:41 PM »
what is a hornbook? would class notes and reading the required textbook and required cases several times be enough for to do well in a 1L class?

The method you're talking about is good enough for some people.
I seem to get better grades when I rely on supplements, and it saves me time. 
A hornbook, usually a "concise hornbook", is a summary of the law in a particular subject.

The "Examples and Explanations" series seems to be the most helpful for me, especially in Civil Procedure (By Glannon)

Everyone is different.  I think the case method is 90% waste and 10% useful.

the white rabbit

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Re: A Letter to my classmates
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2010, 03:41:08 PM »
what is a hornbook? would class notes and reading the required textbook and required cases several times be enough for to do well in a 1L class?

Re-reading material is generally not all that useful in my opinion.
Mood: Tired but cheerful.  :)

Sheshe

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Re: A Letter to my classmates
« Reply #7 on: February 10, 2010, 04:58:21 PM »

OMG this is friggin hilarious! I can't wait to get to law school so I too can enjoy these annoyances!!!
A democracy is nothing more than mob rule, where fifty-one percent of the people may take away the rights of the other forty-nine.

~Thomas Jefferson~

StonewallJacksonFan

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Re: A Letter to my classmates
« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2010, 10:40:48 AM »
Re-reading works magic for me.  After I read a textbook two times I pretty much remember it by heart.  Remember not just words, but understand and can easily apply concepts.  In my business school exams they usually gave us a hypothetical problem and had us apply concepts used in class to the problem.  I got 3.912 in my undergrad.  Arent law school exams pretty much the same (plaintiff A from CA sues defendant B from IL, who brings in third party defendant C from TX; whats the appropriate venue)?  I dont understand why people keep saying that there is no guarantee to get good grades in law school.  Exam questions are objective, they have to be, and if you know your shiit like nobody's business you should get an A.

the white rabbit

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Re: A Letter to my classmates
« Reply #9 on: February 11, 2010, 10:52:00 AM »
Re-reading works magic for me.  After I read a textbook two times I pretty much remember it by heart.  Remember not just words, but understand and can easily apply concepts.  In my business school exams they usually gave us a hypothetical problem and had us apply concepts used in class to the problem.  I got 3.912 in my undergrad.  Arent law school exams pretty much the same (plaintiff A from CA sues defendant B from IL, who brings in third party defendant C from TX; whats the appropriate venue)?  I dont understand why people keep saying that there is no guarantee to get good grades in law school.  Exam questions are objective, they have to be, and if you know your shiit like nobody's business you should get an A.

Exam questions are generally not objective.  They're not so much "what's the right answer" and more "what are the points of contention and what are the relative merits of the arguments on both sides?"
Mood: Tired but cheerful.  :)