Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: Anyone ever screw up an exam after tons of studying?  (Read 8236 times)

KoalaTamer

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 15
    • View Profile
Re: Anyone ever screw up an exam after tons of studying?
« Reply #20 on: January 09, 2010, 09:07:13 PM »
So...the lesson I learned from this whole ordeal? Exactly what some of you (as well as my mentor) said: don't dwell on how you think you did on an exam. Just wait to see your actual score. That test I thought I completely blew? I ended up with an A. I definitely didn't deserve an A, but, as the previous poster said, the curve can be your friend.

I hope this gives some comfort to future 1Ls (or current 1Ls still waiting on their grades).

kenpostudent

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 296
    • MSN Messenger - kenpostudent@hotmail.com
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Anyone ever screw up an exam after tons of studying?
« Reply #21 on: January 13, 2010, 12:40:17 PM »
Yep, I got grades back yesterday... straight As. I guess I didn't blow any exams.

Lemming # 231

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
Re: Anyone ever screw up an exam after tons of studying?
« Reply #22 on: January 27, 2010, 01:56:29 AM »
Well, let me know how your 1L grades turn out, because many of those in the top of your class won't have outlined anything on their own.  Sure, the prof. can test nuances, but 90% of the time, knowing the black letter law and how to apply it will get you the best grade.  For better or worse, law school is about shortcuts to a certain extent.

Meh.  It depends on the student.  The problem most have isn't with knowing the black letter law, it's with the application of it to the hypothetical in question.  The top student in our class refused to touch a commercial brief or canned outline.  For class work and prep materials he stuck with doing his own briefs, looking at the Restatements, his own outline and reputable hornbooks (for the subtle issues.)  Talking to him about it, he made a few points: a) briefing and outlining were in themselves exercises in being clear on the law and its application, b) a lot of students were getting so many supplemental sources that they just confused themselves with it all and c) he memorized the law that way through learning it, rather than the other way around, which meant that anything he had memorized was something he truly understood.


KoalaTamer

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 15
    • View Profile
Re: Anyone ever screw up an exam after tons of studying?
« Reply #23 on: January 27, 2010, 04:11:12 PM »
Wait--you know the top-ranked person in your class? My school is very adamant about not disclosing ranks and not even discussing grades with one another.

Lemming # 231

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
Re: Anyone ever screw up an exam after tons of studying?
« Reply #24 on: January 27, 2010, 05:08:28 PM »
Wait--you know the top-ranked person in your class? My school is very adamant about not disclosing ranks and not even discussing grades with one another.

It wasn't not too hard to figure out.  The test scores, by anonymous # are published for all to see.  Same # showed as the top score for every damn test we had.  I find it hard to believe students at your school don't actually discuss their grades with one another.

kenpostudent

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 296
    • MSN Messenger - kenpostudent@hotmail.com
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Anyone ever screw up an exam after tons of studying?
« Reply #25 on: January 28, 2010, 10:46:10 AM »
Well, let me know how your 1L grades turn out, because many of those in the top of your class won't have outlined anything on their own.  Sure, the prof. can test nuances, but 90% of the time, knowing the black letter law and how to apply it will get you the best grade.  For better or worse, law school is about shortcuts to a certain extent.

Meh.  It depends on the student.  The problem most have isn't with knowing the black letter law, it's with the application of it to the hypothetical in question.  The top student in our class refused to touch a commercial brief or canned outline.  For class work and prep materials he stuck with doing his own briefs, looking at the Restatements, his own outline and reputable hornbooks (for the subtle issues.)  Talking to him about it, he made a few points: a) briefing and outlining were in themselves exercises in being clear on the law and its application, b) a lot of students were getting so many supplemental sources that they just confused themselves with it all and c) he memorized the law that way through learning it, rather than the other way around, which meant that anything he had memorized was something he truly understood.



I find that very believable. Law school material simply is not that hard. Doing well is just a matter of organization: first, the macro organization of the course into a sound but manageable outline, and secondly, organization of an exam answer that the professor will reward. You don't need supplements and hornbooks for that. You just need good time management and discipline. However, I do prefer supplements that focus on application: CALI exercises, Questions & Answers, BarBri materials and E&E. You don't really know the material until you've had to apply it. If you wait until dead weak to apply the material, you're really behind the 8-ball. It's hard to grasp all the subtlties and nuances when you start so late. I think the key to success is very short briefs, outlining as you go, and lots of hypos. I try to take a practice exam at least once a week during the semester, too. By the time dead week comes around, I've seen just about every issue that can be tested multiple times. Repetition is really the key.