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Author Topic: Non ABA to ABA  (Read 6022 times)

coto29

  • Guest
Re: Non ABA to ABA
« Reply #10 on: February 06, 2010, 06:26:19 PM »
It's still true.  Those issues boil down to individual state bar examiner requirements.  For example, some states allow attorneys to pass the bar who have a felony conviction, others do not.  Some don't mention undergraduate requirements others do.  Some states focus on financials, others have lower requirements.  The National Bar Examiners web site has a huge chart breaking down individual state requirements.  Texas, for example, does not allow any felony convictions, but Delaware doesn't mention felonies: they just say all issues are considered as a whole. It would sooooo suck to take and pass the bar in a state and then not be admitted because you filed bankruptcy 20 years ago or something.

cooleylawstudent

  • Guest
Re: Non ABA to ABA
« Reply #11 on: February 06, 2010, 08:56:26 PM »
What state would stop you for bankruptcy 20 years ago? You don't think thats a crime  do you?

It's still true.  Those issues boil down to individual state bar examiner requirements.  For example, some states allow attorneys to pass the bar who have a felony conviction, others do not.  Some don't mention undergraduate requirements others do.  Some states focus on financials, others have lower requirements.  The National Bar Examiners web site has a huge chart breaking down individual state requirements.  Texas, for example, does not allow any felony convictions, but Delaware doesn't mention felonies: they just say all issues are considered as a whole. It would sooooo suck to take and pass the bar in a state and then not be admitted because you filed bankruptcy 20 years ago or something.

coto29

  • Guest
Re: Non ABA to ABA
« Reply #12 on: February 06, 2010, 10:41:35 PM »
Uh. I was exaggerating to make a point, rhetorically. Financial situation is a real concern for the bar examiners.  Foe example, someone can fail character and fitness by defaulting on student loans or not filing tax returns seven years ago (some who didn't file 7 years before taking the bar had to file before he applied or he would have been denied).  It happens, but regardless it's the requirements are different by state.

cooleylawstudent

  • Guest
Re: Non ABA to ABA
« Reply #13 on: February 07, 2010, 12:46:59 AM »
Crazy stuff. You'd think it would matter more on if they lied about it more than anything, but like you said it varies by state. I know some states wont let you sit the bar if you owe back child support for example.

coto29

  • Guest
Re: Non ABA to ABA
« Reply #14 on: February 10, 2010, 06:00:47 PM »
Hey,
I found another one:  California Western takes students from non ABA schools and from part time programs.  They have credit limits though.  Good luck