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Author Topic: Ear plugs when taking the LSAT  (Read 6120 times)

MCB

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Re: Ear plugs when taking the LSAT
« Reply #10 on: December 26, 2009, 08:12:29 PM »
I don't get the whole earplugs thing.  I tried them once, and all it did was amplify the sound of my heartbeat and breathing.  I honestly just think it's a security blanket type of thing.  You really want to be dependent on bright yellow sponges in your ears in order for you to concentrate?  I mean really- people in the library, people taking exams, and they supposedly can't focus unless their ears are plugged.  Don't you already have enough to worry about without having to need something like that?  What are you going to do, spend the rest of your life in your office always fussing about having earplugs on hand?  Just get used to some background noise.  It's not that difficult if you have normal concentration. 
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ptoomey

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Re: Ear plugs when taking the LSAT
« Reply #11 on: December 29, 2009, 07:39:09 AM »
...you risk getting written up for misconduct.  If that happens the misconduct citation is noted on your LSAC candidate report that Law Schools receive when you apply.  Law Schools don't like rule/law breakers/cheaters since lawyers are supposed to uphold the law.

Definitely wouldn't want to risk that.

I don't get the whole earplugs thing.  I tried them once, and all it did was amplify the sound of my heartbeat and breathing.  I honestly just think it's a security blanket type of thing.  You really want to be dependent on bright yellow sponges in your ears in order for you to concentrate?  I mean really- people in the library, people taking exams, and they supposedly can't focus unless their ears are plugged.  Don't you already have enough to worry about without having to need something like that?  What are you going to do, spend the rest of your life in your office always fussing about having earplugs on hand?  Just get used to some background noise.  It's not that difficult if you have normal concentration. 

It's definitely not a security blanket thing for me. If you're saying they don't work for you, I can appreciate that, but I'm not really worried about being dependent on the bright yellow sponges. If they were effective for me(not sure if they would be) and if they were legal, I would certainly use them. I've worked in noisy environments and quiet ones, and there have been times when my productivity has been seriously impaired by noise level. In a work environment, you can always stay late to make up for lost productivity, but that is not the case with the LSAT. We all know that the stakes are very high. Two more correct answers can make the difference between accept and reject. I can accept that using earplugs is not an option, but let's not act as though it's ridiculous to inquire about them.

ptoomey

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Re: Ear plugs when taking the LSAT
« Reply #12 on: December 30, 2009, 03:35:57 AM »
I think this thread should be locked.  It is ridiculous how many replies this ridiculous post is getting, and ironically I'm adding to that number.  ???

locked???? are you kidding me? what's ridiculous about the post?

MCB

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Re: Ear plugs when taking the LSAT
« Reply #13 on: December 30, 2009, 04:35:56 PM »

It's definitely not a security blanket thing for me. If you're saying they don't work for you, I can appreciate that, but I'm not really worried about being dependent on the bright yellow sponges. If they were effective for me(not sure if they would be) and if they were legal, I would certainly use them. I've worked in noisy environments and quiet ones, and there have been times when my productivity has been seriously impaired by noise level. In a work environment, you can always stay late to make up for lost productivity, but that is not the case with the LSAT. We all know that the stakes are very high. Two more correct answers can make the difference between accept and reject. I can accept that using earplugs is not an option, but let's not act as though it's ridiculous to inquire about them.

I didn't mean to imply that it was ridiculous for you to inquire about them.  You make some valid points, and if you really feel like they will help you on the LSAT then I agree that it's worth it to use them.  I guess for me it was more a pent up rant following a couple very long and intense weeks in the library surrounded by weirdos with fluorescent ears.  I just find them very uncomfortable and kind of silly.   :P
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ptoomey

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Re: Ear plugs when taking the LSAT
« Reply #14 on: December 31, 2009, 11:14:31 AM »
I didn't mean to imply that it was ridiculous for you to inquire about them.  You make some valid points, and if you really feel like they will help you on the LSAT then I agree that it's worth it to use them.  I guess for me it was more a pent up rant following a couple very long and intense weeks in the library surrounded by weirdos with fluorescent ears.  I just find them very uncomfortable and kind of silly.   :P

No worries, I think I overreacted a bit. I guess I had some pent up holiday stress of my own.

Jeffort

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Re: Ear plugs when taking the LSAT
« Reply #15 on: January 03, 2010, 03:04:01 AM »

I think this thread should be locked.  It is ridiculous how many replies this ridiculous post is getting, and ironically I'm adding to that number.  ???

Based on your hostile and ridiculous posts filled with anger and unreasonableness that borders on sounding like the rantings of a mental patient in a manic phase, perhaps you are the thing that deserves to be locked up and then properly medicated. 

Asking and talking about earplugs is a legitimate topic.  Some people, like ones with ADD/ADHD get easily distracted and thrown off their train of thought by stray noises. 

Plus, there have been administrations where the schools marching band was practicing right next to the building the test was being administered in.

As far as I can tell, part of the justification for the no earplugs policy (they used to allow them) is to make sure students can and do hear the instructions and the section time notifications (like 5 minutes left or section over, move ahead to the next section). 

There also may be and I suspect that other reasons for the policy change and prohibition of them is related to test security to prevent cheating due to all the new tech communication devices that have become available.  There are ones you can hide inconspicuously in your ear, communicate with, and use as a method to get assistance with the test while taking it to cheat your way into a higher score.


Jeffort

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Re: Ear plugs when taking the LSAT
« Reply #16 on: January 03, 2010, 06:27:56 PM »

I think this thread should be locked.  It is ridiculous how many replies this ridiculous post is getting, and ironically I'm adding to that number.  ???

Based on your hostile and ridiculous posts filled with anger and unreasonableness that borders on sounding like the rantings of a mental patient in a manic phase, perhaps you are the thing that deserves to be locked up and then properly medicated. 

Asking and talking about earplugs is a legitimate topic.  Some people, like ones with ADD/ADHD get easily distracted and thrown off their train of thought by stray noises. 

Plus, there have been administrations where the schools marching band was practicing right next to the building the test was being administered in.

As far as I can tell, part of the justification for the no earplugs policy (they used to allow them) is to make sure students can and do hear the instructions and the section time notifications (like 5 minutes left or section over, move ahead to the next section). 

There also may be and I suspect that other reasons for the policy change and prohibition of them is related to test security to prevent cheating due to all the new tech communication devices that have become available.  There are ones you can hide inconspicuously in your ear, communicate with, and use as a method to get assistance with the test while taking it to cheat your way into a higher score.



may I also say, that if you side with those who would not make a simple gesture as sharing an answer key, that you too are a c*nt? 

Sir, if you legitimately obtain your LSAT materials the answer keys are included.  Unless LSAC made a policy change I'm unaware of that first started being applied to the December 2009 test (they did not!), it is and has always been the case that if you take the test and cancel your score, when scores are released you have access to the full test you took AND the corresponding answer key.  You just don't get to see the answer choices you selected. 

LSAC has not changed that policy:
http://www.lsac.org/pdfs/InformationBookweb.pdf
Page #23

"If you cancel your score, you will not receive a score or copy of your answer sheet.  You will receive written notification of a score cancellation and, if you took a disclosed test,  you will receive a copy of the test questions and the credited responses for the scored sections as well."

Cussing at and referring to people with derogatory terms for refusing to break the law and the legally binding agreement they entered into with LSAC to take the test to try to get into Law School illustrates your character and lack of ethics. 

If you actually did take the December test did you look carefully at your available candidate and test disclosure information on the LSAC web page while logged in?  There are multiple files in PDF form that you have to download individually. 

If in fact you have a copy of the December test and do not have the answer key there are two main possibilities:

#1  You didn't actually take the test and are infringing copyrights by getting the test files from someone that did take it but they didn't also email you their candidate score report (the document that contains the answer key).

#2  You did take the test and simply haven't found the candidate score report pdf file in your account.

Based on your behavior/posts you seem to be a dishonest person that lacks good moral character, honesty and integrity.

Please stop being a hostile jack-arse.

Jeffort

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Re: Ear plugs when taking the LSAT
« Reply #17 on: January 04, 2010, 03:25:27 PM »

I think this thread should be locked.  It is ridiculous how many replies this ridiculous post is getting, and ironically I'm adding to that number.  ???

Based on your hostile and ridiculous posts filled with anger and unreasonableness that borders on sounding like the rantings of a mental patient in a manic phase, perhaps you are the thing that deserves to be locked up and then properly medicated.  

Asking and talking about earplugs is a legitimate topic.  Some people, like ones with ADD/ADHD get easily distracted and thrown off their train of thought by stray noises.  

Plus, there have been administrations where the schools marching band was practicing right next to the building the test was being administered in.

As far as I can tell, part of the justification for the no earplugs policy (they used to allow them) is to make sure students can and do hear the instructions and the section time notifications (like 5 minutes left or section over, move ahead to the next section).  

There also may be and I suspect that other reasons for the policy change and prohibition of them is related to test security to prevent cheating due to all the new tech communication devices that have become available.  There are ones you can hide inconspicuously in your ear, communicate with, and use as a method to get assistance with the test while taking it to cheat your way into a higher score.



may I also say, that if you side with those who would not make a simple gesture as sharing an answer key, that you too are a c*nt?  

Sir, if you legitimately obtain your LSAT materials the answer keys are included.  Unless LSAC made a policy change I'm unaware of that first started being applied to the December 2009 test (they did not!), it is and has always been the case that if you take the test and cancel your score, when scores are released you have access to the full test you took AND the corresponding answer key.  You just don't get to see the answer choices you selected.  

LSAC has not changed that policy:
http://www.lsac.org/pdfs/InformationBookweb.pdf
Page #23

"If you cancel your score, you will not receive a score or copy of your answer sheet.  You will receive written notification of a score cancellation and, if you took a disclosed test,  you will receive a copy of the test questions and the credited responses for the scored sections as well."

Cussing at and referring to people with derogatory terms for refusing to break the law and the legally binding agreement they entered into with LSAC to take the test to try to get into Law School illustrates your character and lack of ethics.  

If you actually did take the December test did you look carefully at your available candidate and test disclosure information on the LSAC web page while logged in?  There are multiple files in PDF form that you have to download individually.  

If in fact you have a copy of the December test and do not have the answer key there are two main possibilities:

#1  You didn't actually take the test and are infringing copyrights by getting the test files from someone that did take it but they didn't also email you their candidate score report (the document that contains the answer key).

#2  You did take the test and simply haven't found the candidate score report pdf file in your account.

Based on your behavior/posts you seem to be a dishonest person that lacks good moral character, honesty and integrity.

Please stop being a hostile jack-arse.


#1  I am not dishonest, but no matter what I say you won't believe that because you are an angel who doesn't sin.

Edit:  I think it is worth noting that I have provided many people with useful and valid advice.  Anyone who thinks otherwise either doesn't know what they're talking about or is just hating.  I am not a dishonest person.  I'm not a saint like you and vesperholly and even Irrx, but hey, I'm human, unlike all of you. :D

#2  My calling you a c*nt isn't any worse than you scorning me.  I didn't post vesperholly's inital reaction when I asked for the answer key, but the word she used was far worse, and it started with an F.

#3  Quit it with the sanctimonious attitude.  Somebody providing me the answer key would simply be sharing.  It's not as if I would put it online to be pirated.  If that was my true intention, I could easily wait until late January to get a copy of the test.  People who think I'm so cheap as to pay the few bucks for the test are out of their minds.  I suppose it's possible if someone is dirt poor, but I am not.

#4  Is a pirated copy of the December 2009 LSAT even available online? I don't think it is.

Dude, you claimed that you took the December 2009 LSAT, have a copy of the test and asked others to give you the answer key.  

It's simple, if in fact you did take the test and have a copy of it you have access to the answer key via logging into your account at www.lsac.org whether you cancelled or not. Scores have been released, the test form disclosure including the score conversion chart and answer key is available to any person that took a disclosed version of the test (unlike international test takers or Saturday Sabbath people that took it on Monday, they don't get any test content disclosure).

http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/prelaw/index.php/topic,4022483.msg5372224.html#msg5372224

I just got this personal message from someone with the screen name llsatt1:

Would you be so kind as to send me the answer key for the December LSAT.  You should be able to just save it to your computer from LSAC and email it.  I would really appreciate it if you could!

How do you guys handle this? For the record, I think it's a jackass maneuver.

So what is the problem and why are you being very combative with everyone?