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Author Topic: Ear plugs when taking the LSAT  (Read 6097 times)

ptoomey

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Ear plugs when taking the LSAT
« on: December 08, 2009, 12:31:54 PM »
I know the LSAC site says that headsets and ear plugs are prohibited, but I also read on here somewhere that some proctors are more strict than others, in general.

Has anyone tried to use ear plugs or seen anyone trying to use them? I'm guessing that the consequences could be severe if you get caught, but it would be nice to not have to worry about all the distracting noises that must exist in that real test taking environment.

violaboy

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Re: Ear plugs when taking the LSAT
« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2009, 12:36:10 PM »
I wouldn't try. Just practice in slightly noisy environments.

Liz Lemon

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Re: Ear plugs when taking the LSAT
« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2009, 12:40:36 PM »
In all likelihood, a big brass band will not be playing at your LSAT administration and you will be fine.  It could happen (I've heard horror stories about marching band practices), but to the point above, just practice where there can be some distractions.  you don't want your score to be reported with a note about irregularities if you do get caught.  it's not worth it.

TruffleMomma

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Re: Ear plugs when taking the LSAT
« Reply #3 on: December 08, 2009, 01:59:57 PM »
They passed out earplugs at the final exams at school yesterday. Ugh. You can hear your heart beating and your breathing is really, really obvious.

If it works for you, it may be helpful down the road, but I agree with Liz Lemon- don't risk it.

sixne2002

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Re: Ear plugs when taking the LSAT
« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2009, 03:11:17 PM »
i took the LSAT this past saturday and right before we start the exam a young lady asked if she could use her ear plugs. the proctor asked his supervisor was it ok and they allowed her to use them. so i guess it really does depend on the testing site. i wish i had known that. i guess its no harm in asking.

EarlCat

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Re: Ear plugs when taking the LSAT
« Reply #5 on: December 09, 2009, 04:35:47 PM »
I wouldn't try. Just practice in slightly noisy environments.

ptoomey

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Re: Ear plugs when taking the LSAT
« Reply #6 on: December 21, 2009, 01:18:58 AM »
i took the LSAT this past saturday and right before we start the exam a young lady asked if she could use her ear plugs. the proctor asked his supervisor was it ok and they allowed her to use them. so i guess it really does depend on the testing site. i wish i had known that. i guess its no harm in asking.

Wow, that's good news. I have a hard time blocking out background noise in certain situations. I can see myself rereading some of the harder Logical Reasoning questions over and over if I had distracting noise to contend with.

Thanks for the feedback everyone.

arcin220

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Re: Ear plugs when taking the LSAT
« Reply #7 on: December 22, 2009, 07:14:27 PM »
I've got one for you, how about if you are partially deaf and want to take your hearing aids out?  Can they tell you that you can't?:-D

ptoomey

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Re: Ear plugs when taking the LSAT
« Reply #8 on: December 24, 2009, 06:13:45 PM »
I've got one for you, how about if you are partially deaf and want to take your hearing aids out?  Can they tell you that you can't?:-D

I doubt they'll give you any trouble. I guess one option is to leave your hearing aids in the car, but would you have trouble hearing the instructions if you did that? If not, I'd do that, although I doubt they'd give you any trouble if you bring them and then take them out.

Jeffort

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Re: Ear plugs when taking the LSAT
« Reply #9 on: December 26, 2009, 05:32:52 PM »
i took the LSAT this past saturday and right before we start the exam a young lady asked if she could use her ear plugs. the proctor asked his supervisor was it ok and they allowed her to use them. so i guess it really does depend on the testing site. i wish i had known that. i guess its no harm in asking.

Wow, that's good news. I have a hard time blocking out background noise in certain situations. I can see myself rereading some of the harder Logical Reasoning questions over and over if I had distracting noise to contend with.

Thanks for the feedback everyone.

Don't count on asking for and being given permission to bring in and wear earplugs.  They are strictly prohibited by the LSAC rules, they are on the list of banned items that you are not even allowed to bring into the test center/room.

If that story is true about a girl getting permission to use them during the last test, the proctors messed up and didn't know what rules they were supposed to be enforcing.  That is not surprising given that many proctors are old retired people that don't even know what the LSAT is that simply want to get out of the house on a Saturday to do something and be around young people for a while. 

If you bring anything that is on the prohibited list in your one gallon ziplock bag that is the only thing you're allowed to bring stuff into the test center with and you have a proctor that is familiar with the rules and also a rule enforcer/obey the law type of person, (which they are supposed to be, pretty much the LSAT police!) you risk getting written up for misconduct.  If that happens the misconduct citation is noted on your LSAC candidate report that Law Schools receive when you apply.  Law Schools don't like rule/law breakers/cheaters since lawyers are supposed to uphold the law.

Like already said, study and practice in locations that have some noise and distractions to get used to focusing and tunning it out.