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Author Topic: NEED HELP HERE - should I take Testmasters?  (Read 19163 times)

sarahb3433

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Law School Admission with Work Experience
« Reply #440 on: June 11, 2009, 09:19:43 PM »
Hey guys!  Looking for a little insight on my particular situation and all of your help and feedback is greatly appreciated... With that being said, here we go!

I went to a JC for one year, making good grades, and then was accepted to Texas A&M University as a political science major.  As soon as I was accepted, my mom was laid off and diagnosed with cancer, and I immediately started working full time, which I continued to do until I graduated, supporting both she and I, along with countless loans.  Needless to say, my grades suffered, and I graduated with a 2.38.  For the past four years, I have been extremely successful in the finance industry, developing a great business that I am not only proud of, but I am good at.  I didn't really have a chance getting a great job out of undergrad because of my grades, so I had to really apply myself in an entrepreneurial environment and am really happy with what I have accomplished.  I've never had a salary or any type of support staff, and have created everything that I have on my own.

After all that, and in this economy, I still feel as though I am missing out on a huge part of my life by not going to law school, which is something I've always wanted to do.  I would be willing to walk away from a six figure income in order to attend law school full time.  Obviously, I would need to absolutely kill it on the LSAT, but how much would my work experience improve my standing with prospective schools?  Are there schools that pay particular or more attention to work and life experiences?  I am not expecting to get into a Top 50 or even Top 100 school, simply because I screwed up in college.  Does it make any difference that I went to a great undergrad school (Top 65 in the nation)?  I really have no idea.

I'm not looking to tell anyone my sob story...  I know there are people out there that have had much more devastation and turmoil than I have had, but still made excellent grades.  I simply wanted to see if anyone had a similar situation, was accepted or rejected, had any feedback, etc.  I have obviously grown up since undergrad and have had life experience that most kids entering law school directly from undergrad don't have.  I have a proven track record in the real world, but does this even mean anything for law school admissions? 

Thanks in advance!!

sarahb3433

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Law School w/ Work Experience
« Reply #441 on: June 11, 2009, 09:23:28 PM »
Hey guys!  Looking for a little insight on my particular situation and all of your help and feedback is greatly appreciated... With that being said, here we go!

I went to a JC for one year, making good grades, and then was accepted to Texas A&M University as a political science major.  As soon as I was accepted, my mom was laid off and diagnosed with cancer, and I immediately started working full time, which I continued to do until I graduated, supporting both she and I, along with countless loans.  Needless to say, my grades suffered, and I graduated with a 2.38.  For the past four years, I have been extremely successful in the finance industry, developing a great business that I am not only proud of, but I am good at.  I didn't really have a chance getting a great job out of undergrad because of my grades, so I had to really apply myself in an entrepreneurial environment and am really happy with what I have accomplished.  I've never had a salary or any type of support staff, and have created everything that I have on my own.

After all that, and in this economy, I still feel as though I am missing out on a huge part of my life by not going to law school, which is something I've always wanted to do.  I would be willing to walk away from a six figure income in order to attend law school full time.  Obviously, I would need to absolutely kill it on the LSAT, but how much would my work experience improve my standing with prospective schools?  Are there schools that pay particular or more attention to work and life experiences?  I am not expecting to get into a Top 50 or even Top 100 school, simply because I screwed up in college.  Does it make any difference that I went to a great undergrad school (Top 65 in the nation)?  I really have no idea.

I'm not looking to tell anyone my sob story...  I know there are people out there that have had much more devastation and turmoil than I have had, but still made excellent grades.  I simply wanted to see if anyone had a similar situation, was accepted or rejected, had any feedback, etc.  I have obviously grown up since undergrad and have had life experience that most kids entering law school directly from undergrad don't have.  I have a proven track record in the real world, but does this even mean anything for law school admissions? 

Thanks in advance!!

sarahb3433

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Law School and Work Experience (Oh yeah, bad grades too!)
« Reply #442 on: June 11, 2009, 09:26:17 PM »
Hey guys!  Looking for a little insight on my particular situation and all of your help and feedback is greatly appreciated... With that being said, here we go!

I went to a JC for one year, making good grades, and then was accepted to Texas A&M University as a political science major.  As soon as I was accepted, my mom was laid off and diagnosed with cancer, and I immediately started working full time, which I continued to do until I graduated, supporting both she and I, along with countless loans.  Needless to say, my grades suffered, and I graduated with a 2.38.  For the past four years, I have been extremely successful in the finance industry, developing a great business that I am not only proud of, but I am good at.  I didn't really have a chance getting a great job out of undergrad because of my grades, so I had to really apply myself in an entrepreneurial environment and am really happy with what I have accomplished.  I've never had a salary or any type of support staff, and have created everything that I have on my own.

After all that, and in this economy, I still feel as though I am missing out on a huge part of my life by not going to law school, which is something I've always wanted to do.  I would be willing to walk away from a six figure income in order to attend law school full time.  Obviously, I would need to absolutely kill it on the LSAT, but how much would my work experience improve my standing with prospective schools?  Are there schools that pay particular or more attention to work and life experiences?  I am not expecting to get into a Top 50 or even Top 100 school, simply because I screwed up in college.  Does it make any difference that I went to a great undergrad school (Top 65 in the nation)?  I really have no idea.

I'm not looking to tell anyone my sob story...  I know there are people out there that have had much more devastation and turmoil than I have had, but still made excellent grades.  I simply wanted to see if anyone had a similar situation, was accepted or rejected, had any feedback, etc.  I have obviously grown up since undergrad and have had life experience that most kids entering law school directly from undergrad don't have.  I have a proven track record in the real world, but does this even mean anything for law school admissions? 

Thanks in advance!!

sarahb3433

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Law School & Work Experience
« Reply #443 on: June 11, 2009, 09:30:28 PM »
Hey guys!  Looking for a little insight on my particular situation and all of your help and feedback is greatly appreciated... With that being said, here we go!

I went to a JC for one year, making good grades, and then was accepted to Texas A&M University as a political science major.  As soon as I was accepted, my mom was laid off and diagnosed with cancer, and I immediately started working full time, which I continued to do until I graduated, supporting both she and I, along with countless loans.  Needless to say, my grades suffered, and I graduated with a 2.38.  For the past four years, I have been extremely successful in the finance industry, developing a great business that I am not only proud of, but I am good at.  I didn't really have a chance getting a great job out of undergrad because of my grades, so I had to really apply myself in an entrepreneurial environment and am really happy with what I have accomplished.  I've never had a salary or any type of support staff, and have created everything that I have on my own.

After all that, and in this economy, I still feel as though I am missing out on a huge part of my life by not going to law school, which is something I've always wanted to do.  I would be willing to walk away from a six figure income in order to attend law school full time.  Obviously, I would need to absolutely kill it on the LSAT, but how much would my work experience improve my standing with prospective schools?  Are there schools that pay particular or more attention to work and life experiences?  I am not expecting to get into a Top 50 or even Top 100 school, simply because I screwed up in college.  Does it make any difference that I went to a great undergrad school (Top 65 in the nation)?  I really have no idea.

I'm not looking to tell anyone my sob story...  I know there are people out there that have had much more devastation and turmoil than I have had, but still made excellent grades.  I simply wanted to see if anyone had a similar situation, was accepted or rejected, had any feedback, etc.  I have obviously grown up since undergrad and have had life experience that most kids entering law school directly from undergrad don't have.  I have a proven track record in the real world, but does this even mean anything for law school admissions? 

Thanks in advance!!

Wanabattorney

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  • The law is reason free from passion.--Aristotle
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Opinions on becoming a Paralegal to help fund school.
« Reply #444 on: August 02, 2009, 06:58:15 PM »

 Hello, I'm new here.  I have a question for everyone.  What are your opinions on someone getting paralegal training and working as one to help fund school?  I have been struggling trying to find a career since I can remember, (I'm currently 37).  Well I have decided that I will just go for it and attempt to become an Attorney.  I have always found the legal field interesting and feel that I could do well in it.  Ideally I'd like to end up as an ADA/Prosecutor. I know, I know they don't earn very much in comparison to a private practice Attorney but it's the path I'd prefer. I am former military and have the G.I. Bill but I have been looking for work for months now, I am considering becoming a paralegal so I can get a decent paying job. I will then get back into school for a B.A. in Political Science and apply to law school.  I figure the worst case scenario is I don't make it into law school but I'll have a good paying career anyway,(provided I find a paralegal job) as this job market sucks. The best case, I work while going to school, getting some valuable real world legal experience.  I'd like your input/advice on the matter. Thanks.

lula

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PT 30 Sec 4 LR Question 20
« Reply #445 on: August 05, 2009, 02:16:52 PM »
"New Drugs in the marketplace and their social impact" question

Why B is wrong?
Doesnít  B slightly strengthen the argument by linking the condition in the premise (having a good understanding of a drugs social impact) to the new drugs (some of whom lack this social understanding factor). I know it doesnít strengthen it much, since itís only ďsomeĒ, but it still seems to strengthen it a bit. 

lawrookie

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I know to the actual lawyers here this is old news, but I thought it was another interesting thing to share with my pre-law people on line. I read in my pre-law book that if you punch (or stab/shoot) someone in the back that you get in less trouble than if you warned them to defend themselves and it was a fair fight? You'd think it would be the opposit way, but according to my textbooks its not since battery is attacking, assault if the fear of the attack, and if they know it is coming then it is assault and battery, but if by suprise then it is just battery. If you tried that in the military, I promise your CO would view it the opposit way at your article 15 hearing though.  :o

GoVols

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Question about who to pick to write my LOR
« Reply #447 on: August 12, 2009, 10:24:38 PM »
I was in the military and the Jewish layleader there was a Master Sergeant who had previously been an attorney who graduated from Southern Cal.  I worked directly with him for almost a year and he has a fond opinion of me.  Obviously that is going to be one, right? 

I then have my language teachers from when I was learning a language at the Defense Language Institute.  It was a 63 week, 7 hour a day, 5 days a week course.  They are native to another country though and might not make the best letters, considering their English may be fairly poor.

I also have a former Sunday school teacher who is a PhD who would write one.

I have a PHD candidate English teacher who I still talk to to this day who would write one.

I also have the associate director of the day camp I worked at as a director for the teenage program.  I could get a very good one from him.

So, if I have to choose just 2 or 3 of these, which should I choose?


grad09

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PS Topic decision- advice greatly appreciated!!
« Reply #448 on: August 23, 2009, 11:46:47 PM »
Hello,
I am looking for different opinions on how to write my personal statements. I just graduated from Boston U (GPA 3.42) and am working on the LSATs as we speak via Kaplan. My goal is to get into a top 20 law school, and I understand in order to do so, I need a great personal statement (aside from scoring well on the LSAT). But I donít know what exactly I want to convey about myself or what situations in my life I would like to focus on. I thought of a few ideas, any help or criticism would be greatly appreciated.

1-   Disadvantages in upbringing/education/socioeconomic conditions
I was raised in a small city in NJ near Manhattan. The city is poor, incredibly overpopulated, and the primary language is Spanish. It is full of Hispanic/Latino diversity, so being of Cuban heritage, my immigrant grandparents who settled there fit right in. However, there is an incredible lack of higher education in its populace and a terrible education system, which has made the city a place with a little opportunity for upcoming youth. During high school, out of a graduating class of 500, the average SAT score was just below 900 (on the old 1600 scale). The 10 or so students with SATs above 1000 were praised on a hallway bulletin board. I was thinking about writing how tough it was to make it out of here, get into a respectable undergraduate program, etc. Also, I was thinking of possibly tying in some sparked interest in immigration law.

2-   Unique career goals
As you may have read above, I grew up right outside NYC. Thus, I lived through a pretty momentous occasion- 9/11. I saw with my own eyes the terror as it unfolded, and I felt fear pervade the environment I lived in. This experience created a devotion to combating terrorism, hence why I studied Arabic and majored in International Relations. I have wanted to work for the bureau ever since, and I want to attend law school as an avenue to the FBI. However, Iím not sure how an admissions committee would respond to this. Will they appreciate this reason for attending law school, or is this seen as a misguided reason? Also, I have recently been diagnosed with a heart condition at 22 yrs old (so lame) which may impede my efforts to work for the FBI. So being a lawyer might be the closest I will ever come to being a special agent. Should I mention this? I am fearful the committee will think I am looking to law school as a second option, and I donít really want to be there. What are your thoughts?

3-   Interest in international affairs
My last idea was to write about my interest in international affairs, combined with the experience of studying abroad in Australia. It was a life lesson in itself; I went through good times and bad. I feel itís a little clichť sometimes, but I just wanted to throw it out there.

What do you guys think? Thanks for the help!

jdomash

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September LSAT Waitlist?
« Reply #449 on: August 31, 2009, 08:08:43 PM »
I registered for the September LSAT about a month ago and was waitlisted.  I am still on the waitlist...what are the odds something opens up?  Should I try to take it at a different location?
Thanks!