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Author Topic: Transfer Friendly Law Schools  (Read 11745 times)

Contract2008

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Re: Transfer Friendly Law Schools
« Reply #10 on: February 08, 2010, 05:36:10 PM »
How well would I have to do at Ohio Northern to transfer to a Low T1/High T2 school?

Top 20% or so.

Thane Messinger

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Re: Transfer Friendly Law Schools
« Reply #11 on: February 10, 2010, 03:01:20 AM »
Anyone know which schools are transfer friendly?

There's a book out on this if it's not been mentioned.  It's title is The Art of the Law School Transfer, by Andrew Carrabis and Seth Haimovitch.

Transferring law schools is trickier than it might at first seem, and comes with numerous personal considerations, among them a loss of GPA at the new school, often a last-in-line position for course selection and scholarships, and feelings of loneliness among a new crowd.  For the right person it can be a great opportunity, but it's important to go into it with one's eyes open.  

Importantly, for those considering transferring for the job benefits, those are real.  Interviewers will be curious, but not (usually) in the negative sense.  They'll be impressed by your motivation and perseverance, and will want to know that you can handle yourself.  As most transfer up, the vocational boost can be quite significant.

Also, the deadlines for transfer applications are quite strict.  (And, unlike most applications, the final decision on transfer applicants is often made by the dean of admissions personally.)  Of special imporance are grades, both in what they are and in getting them in on time.

Best of luck to you,

Thane.

Where do you practice now?  Can you hook me up with a job?


Contract2008 & All -

As I now teach primarily, after years of practice, I am likely not to be entirely helpful, depending upon your preferences and particulars.

I might also relate a personal history, as I too faced a market much like this one, many moons ago, and as I have traveled to numerous law schools and seen similar questions being asked of visiting associates, partners, and even judges.  So, my perspective is perhaps unique.

For a number of reasons, this is unlikely to be a successful approach.  Among the reasons are that attorneys are intensely jealous of their reputation, which, in practice, is pretty much one's paycheck.  With regard to employment inquiries, few attorneys would refer a prospective attorney to another attorney, absent a reasonably serious basis for the recommendation.  This might be a clerkship, part-time job, or possibly some extended personal knowledge (such as a family connection).  One might think of a snooty version of some episode of Masterpiece Theatre, which isn't too far off the mark, actually.  The exceptions to this prove the rule: I've seen "recommendations" that all-but-kill an applicant's chances with some version of "I had to give this person your name, I'm sorry, but just to be sure you get the message I have absolutely nothing to go on..."  That, of course, is just about the kiss of death for that law office, regardless of the qualifications.  (Exception to exception: "I have absolutely nothing to go on but I think she's editor-in-chief at the Stanford Law Review."  That takes it from trash can to edge of desk just above can.)

For ideas on jobs, starting your practice, and overall success, if you can find a copy of my book in the library that might be helfpul.  (For different reasons, either one will suffice.)  There's also The Insider's Guide to Getting a Big Firm Job (somewhat badly named, as it's applicable to all law jobs), on interviewing.  And either of Morten Lund's books is excellent.  Read any of these and that job is much closer.

Best of luck to you,

Thane.  

Contract2008

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Re: Transfer Friendly Law Schools
« Reply #12 on: February 11, 2010, 01:54:20 PM »
Anyone know which schools are transfer friendly?

There's a book out on this if it's not been mentioned.  It's title is The Art of the Law School Transfer, by Andrew Carrabis and Seth Haimovitch.

Transferring law schools is trickier than it might at first seem, and comes with numerous personal considerations, among them a loss of GPA at the new school, often a last-in-line position for course selection and scholarships, and feelings of loneliness among a new crowd.  For the right person it can be a great opportunity, but it's important to go into it with one's eyes open.  

Importantly, for those considering transferring for the job benefits, those are real.  Interviewers will be curious, but not (usually) in the negative sense.  They'll be impressed by your motivation and perseverance, and will want to know that you can handle yourself.  As most transfer up, the vocational boost can be quite significant.

Also, the deadlines for transfer applications are quite strict.  (And, unlike most applications, the final decision on transfer applicants is often made by the dean of admissions personally.)  Of special imporance are grades, both in what they are and in getting them in on time.

Best of luck to you,

Thane.

Where do you practice now?  Can you hook me up with a job?


Contract2008 & All -

As I now teach primarily, after years of practice, I am likely not to be entirely helpful, depending upon your preferences and particulars.

I might also relate a personal history, as I too faced a market much like this one, many moons ago, and as I have traveled to numerous law schools and seen similar questions being asked of visiting associates, partners, and even judges.  So, my perspective is perhaps unique.

For a number of reasons, this is unlikely to be a successful approach.  Among the reasons are that attorneys are intensely jealous of their reputation, which, in practice, is pretty much one's paycheck.  With regard to employment inquiries, few attorneys would refer a prospective attorney to another attorney, absent a reasonably serious basis for the recommendation.  This might be a clerkship, part-time job, or possibly some extended personal knowledge (such as a family connection).  One might think of a snooty version of some episode of Masterpiece Theatre, which isn't too far off the mark, actually.  The exceptions to this actually prove the rule: I've seen "recommendations" that all-but-kill an applicant's chances with some version of "I had to give this person your name, I'm sorry, but just to be sure you get the message I have absolutely nothing to go on..."  That, of course, is just about the kiss of death for that law office, regardless of the qualifications.  (Exception to exception: "I have absolutely nothing to go on but I think she's editor-in-chief at the Stanford Law Review."  That takes it from trash can to edge of desk just above can.)

For ideas on jobs, starting your practice, and overall success, if you can find a copy of my book in the library that might be helfpul.  (For different reasons, either one will suffice.)  There's also The Insider's Guide to Getting a Big Firm Job (somewhat badly named, as it's applicable to all law jobs), on interviewing.  And either of Morten Lund's books is excellent.  Read any of these and that job is much closer.

Best of luck to you,

Thane.  


In short, your answer to my second question is "no?" 



Thane Messinger

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Excursion: A Law Job
« Reply #13 on: February 12, 2010, 03:30:57 AM »
Quote

In short, your answer to my second question is "no?"  



There are several possible answers, actually.  At the risk of taking this thread a bit too far afield (from its focus on transfer-friendly schools), I'm reminded of what just about every lawyer I know would say.  Actually, that's not quite right.  I can't think of a lawyer for whom "No" wouldn't be the most polite answer.

In any event, that is not I.  So, help me along.  What sort of law job are you seeking?  What and where do you hope to practice?

Thane.

Contract2008

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Re: Excursion: A Law Job
« Reply #14 on: February 13, 2010, 05:26:44 PM »
Quote

In short, your answer to my second question is "no?"  



There are several possible answers, actually.  At the risk of taking this thread a bit too far afield (from its focus on transfer-friendly schools), I'm reminded of what just about every lawyer I know would say.  Actually, that's not quite right.  I can't think of a lawyer for whom "No" wouldn't be the most polite answer.

In any event, that is not I.  So, help me along.  What sort of law job are you seeking?  What and where do you hope to practice?

Thane.

Step being so serious.  I am just playing with you. 

coto29

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Re: Transfer Friendly Law Schools
« Reply #15 on: March 22, 2010, 07:00:40 PM »
Why wouldn't you take him up on his offer?  For the potential ideas at least. And I'm a guy who likes to mess with people quite a bit.

Give me some ideas if you can, please.  I want to transfer from a school that has a 3 tier grading system rather than a normal 5 tier system.  This is a problem.

Have you dealt with any students in this position? The school is OK academically, but the job prospects after graduation are poor.  And the area sucks.  I really want to transfer. 

Do you know of any students who have transferred while in this position?  Thanks in advance for any advice.