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Author Topic: Graduating college early  (Read 1318 times)

adn32

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Graduating college early
« on: October 26, 2009, 03:17:34 PM »
Hey,

I have been reading the forums here for some time, and have decided to get my own username. I have been planning to graduate college early for some time now. I am just wondering if this can negatively impact my law school application. I am currently a sophomore at Saint Joseph's University. I have read on here and other forums that it does adcomms look unfavorably on early graduates.
I did not come into college with AP credit, etc. I would be graduating with the same amount of college courses as any "normal" graduate, I would just completing all the requirements in three years. I have also been an active member in community service both at my school and in my hometown (am planning a community-wide event for this coming August). I work about 7 - 8 hours a week (a Work-Study job), and take part in other activities on campus.

I asked UPenn about this and the response they gave me was such:

"Thank you for your message and interest in Penn Law.  Maturity, leadership, and well-roundedness are qualities which our students display; yet, we make no assumptions as to when or how soon a candidate may demonstrate such a record."

I felt this was somewhat vague, but also disproves any notion of applicants being rejected because they graduated a year early. Not sure if it means anything, but I was actually held back in pre-school, so I guess I would just be "catching up" in a way.

Thanks for any responses. I am sorry for the long message!

Ninja1

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Re: Graduating college early
« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2009, 11:04:53 PM »
If a school notices you graduated early, they'll probably treat it as a good thing if anything.

It's not going to hurt you.
I'mma stay bumpin' till I bump my head on my tomb.

nealric

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Re: Graduating college early
« Reply #2 on: October 28, 2009, 02:14:19 PM »
I graduated from college in 3 years. I don't think it hurt me.
Georgetown Law Graduate

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Now who's being naive?

oceansmarine

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Re: Graduating college early
« Reply #3 on: October 28, 2009, 03:14:47 PM »
In having two brothers graduate from ST. Joe's, thousands of former classmates from B. Eustace and with myself working directly with the US Attorney, The DOJ and Texas State Attorney Generals on resolving the impasse for law school admissions, it does not matter as to when you graduate.  Your GPA will be adjusted by LSDAS and will become your calling card for law School.  Throw out the LSAT test score, it is now a formality, but you would want to impress the Regents.  Currently, you have a 59.2% chance in getting into any law school. 83,371 for the 49,414 Freshman seats for 2008-2009 admissions.

Article in Print that you may want to review:  Fixing Law School Admissions  Weselyan University Argus paper.  Google and then click on Web.  If you do not get in, sue !!!..........     You will do fine.

nealric

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Re: Graduating college early
« Reply #4 on: October 28, 2009, 03:29:35 PM »
Quote
Throw out the LSAT test score, it is now a formality, but you would want to impress the Regents.  Currently, you have a 59.2% chance in getting into any law school. 83,371 for the 49,414 Freshman seats for 2008-2009 admissions.

 ??? ??? ???
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Re: Graduating college early
« Reply #5 on: October 28, 2009, 05:12:23 PM »
Quote
Throw out the LSAT test score, it is now a formality, but you would want to impress the Regents.  Currently, you have a 59.2% chance in getting into any law school. 83,371 for the 49,414 Freshman seats for 2008-2009 admissions.

 ??? ??? ???

Is this actually an elaborate flame?  I'm just....... speechless.

nitr0x99

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Re: Graduating college early
« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2009, 05:48:23 PM »
Quote
Throw out the LSAT test score, it is now a formality, but you would want to impress the Regents.  Currently, you have a 59.2% chance in getting into any law school. 83,371 for the 49,414 Freshman seats for 2008-2009 admissions.

 ??? ??? ???

Is this actually an elaborate flame?  I'm just....... speechless.

I think he meant that using the percentages of applications compared to the percentage of acceptances is a bit daft when deciding probabilities.  Those with different lsat scores and gpas have way different probabilities than each other. You can not just generalize and say 59% chance of getting into law school lmao

oceansmarine

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Re: Graduating college early
« Reply #7 on: October 28, 2009, 07:15:15 PM »
The numbers are correct.  LSAC just released the information and was posted by the University of Tenn. They are for the ABA approved schools only.  The non ABA and Canadian schools are not required to report admissions numbers,

George Washington School of law requires that you take the LSAT however if you read on, should you apply to law school, the numeric LSAT score will not be counted for/against the admissions process.  This change was in response to admissions without the LSAT test for incoming freshman into their BA/JD Duel major program.  Their are many issues now being address by the DOJ and US Attorney General since the Grutter decision was announced in 2003.

Also, note that many other law schools are now posting the same information.  Should you maintain a GPA level that is pre-announced, (in-short they are attempting to keep students from leaving the state) the LSAT test score is not a factor into the admissions process.  And many schools are now attempting to reduce your requirements of education time from 7 years to 6.  This would also reduce your education loans required which has become a problem for all students.   Nearly 100 billion dollars in loans are now uncollectable and the issue has become a crisis for the student loan program (the report was presented by Mary Sue Coleman).  One other Note, the legal profession has loss nearly 900 thousand attorneys over the last 11 years.  Their attempt to stem these losses has become a priority.           

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Re: Graduating college early
« Reply #8 on: October 28, 2009, 08:54:26 PM »
The numbers are correct.  LSAC just released the information and was posted by the University of Tenn. They are for the ABA approved schools only.  The non ABA and Canadian schools are not required to report admissions numbers,

George Washington School of law requires that you take the LSAT however if you read on, should you apply to law school, the numeric LSAT score will not be counted for/against the admissions process.  This change was in response to admissions without the LSAT test for incoming freshman into their BA/JD Duel major program.  Their are many issues now being address by the DOJ and US Attorney General since the Grutter decision was announced in 2003.

Also, note that many other law schools are now posting the same information.  Should you maintain a GPA level that is pre-announced, (in-short they are attempting to keep students from leaving the state) the LSAT test score is not a factor into the admissions process.  And many schools are now attempting to reduce your requirements of education time from 7 years to 6.  This would also reduce your education loans required which has become a problem for all students.   Nearly 100 billion dollars in loans are now uncollectable and the issue has become a crisis for the student loan program (the report was presented by Mary Sue Coleman).  One other Note, the legal profession has loss nearly 900 thousand attorneys over the last 11 years.  Their attempt to stem these losses has become a priority.           

I have no idea what you're trying to say.  ... That the LSAT doesn't generally matter in the admissions process because of a few statements of dubious sincerity? 

mccarthy

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Re: Graduating college early
« Reply #9 on: October 28, 2009, 09:59:02 PM »
Somebody tell me the guy has it all wrong. I was under the impression that most schools used gpas and lsat scores to generate index numbers that would be used to consider one's candidacy.