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Author Topic: I need some help...  (Read 824 times)

hbs10

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I need some help...
« on: October 11, 2009, 11:51:57 PM »
I'm a 30-something and I'm taking my LSAT on 2/6/2010. I've already graduated from college (my LSAC GPA ended up being a 3.2) and have submitted all of my LOR's (I was planning on going to law school a few yrs ago, but got sidetracked with stuff)...anyhow, my LOR's are 2 years old--will adcoms hold that against me? I feel like an ass asking my recommenders for new ones. I also bought a Kaplan book and I scored a 60% on the diagnostic (untimed)--I know that doesn't really help being untimed, but I'm guessing that I'm somewhere around 145-150 cold. Is it possible to jump into the 160's but February. Let me know what you think of my dielemmas. Thanks.

Papa Bear

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Re: I need some help...
« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2009, 08:55:50 PM »
I don't know if the admissions folks will hold your 2 yr old letters of rec against you.  In fact, I kind of doubt it, but I don't know.  I suggest you suck it up and ask your "recommenders" for fresh letters unless your relationships with them are now strained.  I would also practice some self-advocacy by putting your earlier decision not to pursue law school in a positive light.

My advice on the LSAT is to get Powerscore bibles, study like crazy, buy up lots of practice tests from LSAC or Amazon, and take timed practice tests once a week until about 4 weeks before, at which point you take a few in a row, then rest for a few days, and kick some major LSAT butt.  It's important that you only take the practice tests once, and that you time them to get the most out of them.  Retaking a practice test--even once that you took months ago--will give you a false sense of progress.

Scoring well on the LSAT is critical, because this economy isn't treating lawyers particularly well, so you should aim for a very good school or to get one to pay most or all of your tuition.  I also very strongly recommend that you carefully think through your motivation and goals with respect to law school, if you haven't already.  Law school, while oftentimes rewarding, is a huge commitment that really takes a toll.

Let me know if you need anything else.
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