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Author Topic: Another Issue Spotting Question  (Read 784 times)

USAFVETERAN

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Another Issue Spotting Question
« on: October 08, 2009, 10:20:33 PM »
What is the best approach to exam taking.  I took a mock exam and decided to take the thorough explanation approach.  However, I only had time for very few issues.  Another student opted the a more shallow issue...next...issue...next.. .issue approach.  He found more issues but lacked substance about those issues.  Which approach should one take?  This question is obviously for upper level students.  Please 1L's do not chime in.

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Re: Another Issue Spotting Question
« Reply #1 on: October 09, 2009, 03:35:13 AM »
As with everything in law school, the answer lies somewhere in the middle.  You do want to spot as many issues as you can; but, with that being said, you have to realize that some of the issues on your test are going to be more contentious than others.  The art is to figure out which issues your teacher was trying to get you to focus on in-depth and make sure you analyze those thoroughly.  For other issues, you can sort of just raise them and quickly dismiss them sort of deal (or a short, simple analysis).

I'd write more on this, but it's late and I'm tired.  I'll check back tomorrow to see what other people think and maybe add some more of my thoughts.

USAFVETERAN

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Re: Another Issue Spotting Question
« Reply #2 on: October 09, 2009, 09:14:12 AM »
Thanks.  I will try to find a middle ground somewhere.   Also is there any marked advantage to taking the exams on a laptop as opposed to writing?

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Re: Another Issue Spotting Question
« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2009, 11:51:14 AM »
Thanks.  I will try to find a middle ground somewhere.   Also is there any marked advantage to taking the exams on a laptop as opposed to writing?

Personally, I'd think you'd have to be crazy to want to write your exams, but it really does depend on the person.  If, somehow in this day and age, you're a *horrible* typist (really, really slow) and you're hand writing speed is faster, then maybe you'd want to write your exams.  But here are things to consider:

1.  These exams are long and, I remember, when I used to hand-write exams in college I would get cramps for an 1 1/2 hour tests.

2.  Typing exams gives you the advantage to go back and reorganize your work and change things with ease.

One of my friends from first year wrote his exams and did extremely well (read:  top 10%); but I did do better  :P

Of course that's in jest, but, in the end, it'd seem that what you'd feel most comfortable with is the way to go.  I think the biggest disadvantage to typing your exams is that you get into a certain mentality where you think that if you type the most, you'll get the most points.  This leads to poor analysis and just making very trivial arguments that aren't going to impress teachers.  When you write your exams, you have to think a lot more before you write b/c it isn't that easy to go back and change things.