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Author Topic: transfer worries...  (Read 464 times)

victortsoi

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transfer worries...
« on: September 30, 2009, 02:47:15 PM »
Hello all,
Well in short I started out pre med and did pretty badly in my first school, failed two chemistry classes, and transferred after my junior year to a private university where I expect to do very well, hopefully  >3.7 or even higher, and I expect to do over ~170 on the LSAT (been practicing a lot)- and have a successful internship with a state supreme court judge to my credit who will write a stellar rec, and some more internships before I apply.
The question is...just how badly will my early foibles hurt me if at all? Should I offset this by spending more time/credits in my current college and doing as best I can?
thanks in advance guys!

nealric

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Re: transfer worries...
« Reply #1 on: October 01, 2009, 09:27:39 AM »
It will hurt you to the extent it hurts your cumulative GPA. Even if your new school wipes the slate clean, the LSAC will count your old grades. It might be a good idea to delay graduation if you can up your GPA significantly by doing so.
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victortsoi

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Re: transfer worries...
« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2009, 01:13:56 PM »
so should I spend an extra year or two years in school?

victortsoi

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Re: transfer worries...
« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2009, 01:15:57 PM »
so should I spend an extra year or two years in school?

Slumdog Lovebutton

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Re: transfer worries...
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2009, 02:15:19 PM »
so should I spend an extra year or two years in school?

This depends entirely on how much it would cost, whether you could stand doing so, and by how much it would raise your grade.  If it would take you two years to go from a 3.2 to a 3.3, and you'd need to get all A's, I doubt it's worth it.
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