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Author Topic: Advice for Entry-Level Attorneys  (Read 5416 times)

woomen

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Advice for Entry-Level Attorneys
« on: September 25, 2009, 10:24:49 AM »
For those recent grads who are still waiting to hear back from the bar on whether they passed the bar - what are you guys doing in the meantime? 

If you're looking for jobs, how so?  I've mass mailed small to large firms, looked through job searches on the internet, and have been networking with my alums and professional associations since taking the bar - with absolutely no luck.  I've invested a lot of time and energy in doing these things as best as I can, and it doesn't seem like my best is enough. 

I was thinking maybe if I wait to do all of these things until AFTER I get my bar results (and pass hopefully), then I'll get the responses I'm looking for.  I dunno.  For now, I'll settle for a shot of whiskey and a hug.

BikePilot

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Re: Advice for Entry-Level Attorneys
« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2009, 10:18:09 AM »
I suspect big law is going to be hard with some firms making less than full offers to their summer classes.  Any chance you could leverage some connections from 1L or 2L summer employment?
HLS 2010

chevelle

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Re: Advice for Entry-Level Attorneys
« Reply #2 on: October 09, 2009, 09:13:34 AM »
Woomen - I am in the same position. Still waiting for NY Bar Results and looking for a job. In the meantime, I worked on an article I had written for a class in law school and submitted it for publication and got a couple of offers. Also, I am working part-time for a professor from my school, doing some research for a law review article he is interested in writing.

But I too have tried pretty much everything...networking, applying to firms of all sizes. Nothing is working.

The most maddening thing is when I will apply to a job posting I'm qualified for and not even get an interview.

Miche

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Re: Advice for Entry-Level Attorneys
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2009, 01:10:42 AM »
Two of my friends are volunteering at law clinics while waiting. I know a few people working in government agencies. Their goal is to network while waiting for their results.

For my part, I did apply to a few jobs before I received my results; mostly, though, I traveled and took care of the myriad details that had fallen through the cracks until that point. My theory was that I would be looking for work and then working basically non-stop once the results came in. (I had some savings, which I used to pay bills during that time.)
Lawyers: performing acts on desks that no decent person would ever do.
-Miche, co-creator of Sharp & Useless

woomen

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Re: Advice for Entry-Level Attorneys
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2010, 09:10:48 AM »
Chevelle - congrats on getting published - I'm sure that will help out with your employment outlook.  I'm thinking about publishing as well; Where do you go to publish? 

Thane Messinger

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Re: Advice for Entry-Level Attorneys
« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2010, 05:17:02 PM »
For those recent grads who are still waiting to hear back from the bar on whether they passed the bar - what are you guys doing in the meantime? 

If you're looking for jobs, how so?  I've mass mailed small to large firms, looked through job searches on the internet, and have been networking with my alums and professional associations since taking the bar - with absolutely no luck.  I've invested a lot of time and energy in doing these things as best as I can, and it doesn't seem like my best is enough. 

I was thinking maybe if I wait to do all of these things until AFTER I get my bar results (and pass hopefully), then I'll get the responses I'm looking for.  I dunno.  For now, I'll settle for a shot of whiskey and a hug.


Woomen & All -

As to hugs, why not?  HR aside, I'm sure there are a few in the county of your choice who are good huggers.  Please do specify they category of hug, however: bear, platonic, not-so-platonic . . .

Whisky?  What's your brand?  (Be careful, however, when mixing the above two.   = :  )

Congratulations as to the article and research.  Those are rewarding in many ways. 

As to the advice . . .

Now is the time to get engaged in the job search.  Especially because the market is difficult, and because others are waiting, NOW is the time to make whatever contacts you can, and to get the very personal process started.  Your professors (and the professor with whom you currently work) are a good place to start.  Chances are they know of firms . . . perhaps smaller or mid-sized firms needing an associate or part-time work . . . and their say-so will be HUGELY beneficial.

There are many, many ways to land that job.  After you've had the shot of whisky and hug (not necessarily in that order), I recommend finding the following book.  (In the library if they have it.)  It's the Insider's Guide to Getting a Big Firm Job.  A bit mistitled, in my opinion, as it's quite helpful (perhpas more helpful) to those who aren't the OCI stars.

And, at the risk of (partial) self promotion, I'll recommend three more books in getting ready for practice (and in getting ready for the mind-meld of knowing what and why the interview questions will be as they are.)

Here goes . . . mine last . . .

From Morten Lund, two books.  Jagged Rocks of Wisdom and Jagged Rocks of Wisdom--The Memo.  (There's a third that will be coming out later this year, on negotiation.)

And mine, The Young Lawyer's Jungle Book: A Survival Guide.

Take the above with whatever grain of salt you feel appropriate, but do engage with all your heart, now now now, in the search.  It will make a big difference . . . to your finding a good employer, to your finding the right fit between that employer and you, and to your happiness and sense of accomplishment.

Truly, good luck.

Thane.