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Author Topic: Psychiatric Disability Right in Law School  (Read 4324 times)

scrobin

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Psychiatric Disability Right in Law School
« on: September 24, 2009, 10:57:55 PM »
In a lot of higher education institution, they ignore disability rights laws regarding psychiatric disabilities.  They think students are just going to use it to slack off.  The truth is that psychiatric disabilities, are illnesses just like asthma or diabetes, and people with psychiatric disabilities are just as sane, capable, and intelligent as anyone else. 

I was wondering,if anyone here with a psychiatric disability who is in law school, can tell me; which law schools are psychiatric disability friendly, how to deal with a psychiatric disability in law school,what kind of accomdinations law schools will give students with psychiatric disabilities, how to deal with the psychiatric disability in the admissions process, and are disabilities concerned a minority in the law school admissions process?

Advocate

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Re: Psychiatric Disability Right in Law School
« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2009, 09:44:19 AM »
What kind of psychiatric disabilities are you talking about?  I know that persons with documented (serious) learning disabilities can get extra (sometimes double) time on exams. Accommodations in law school are tricky though because there is no law that will ever make an employer give an associate extra time to finish a memo -- regardless of whether the associate has a learning disability. So I am a little cynical about the value of accommodations that could lull a person into spending lots of money on school and then being unable to actually work with the degree after graduation. It seems like a "bait and switch."

scrobin

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Re: Psychiatric Disability Right in Law School
« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2009, 02:25:48 PM »
What kind of psychiatric disabilities are you talking about?  I know that persons with documented (serious) learning disabilities can get extra (sometimes double) time on exams. Accommodations in law school are tricky though because there is no law that will ever make an employer give an associate extra time to finish a memo -- regardless of whether the associate has a learning disability. So I am a little cynical about the value of accommodations that could lull a person into spending lots of money on school and then being unable to actually work with the degree after graduation. It seems like a "bait and switch."

I'm taking about unipolar and bipolar depression.  I'm taking about extended time for tests and assignments if need be. 

People with disabilities are just as intelligent and capable as anyone else, and they are entitled to their civil rights.

elle-y

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Re: Psychiatric Disability Right in Law School
« Reply #3 on: September 25, 2009, 02:40:36 PM »
Why would someone with bipolar depression need extra time for tests and assignments? That's an emotional disability, not learning, like ADD or Dyslexia.

I can understand how a "breakdown" may impact the need for extra time on assignments on an as-needed basis, but I believe to request consistent additional time may be using the disability to your advantage when that disability does not require extra time.
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Matthies

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Re: Psychiatric Disability Right in Law School
« Reply #4 on: September 25, 2009, 06:20:49 PM »
What kind of psychiatric disabilities are you talking about?  I know that persons with documented (serious) learning disabilities can get extra (sometimes double) time on exams. Accommodations in law school are tricky though because there is no law that will ever make an employer give an associate extra time to finish a memo -- regardless of whether the associate has a learning disability. So I am a little cynical about the value of accommodations that could lull a person into spending lots of money on school and then being unable to actually work with the degree after graduation. It seems like a "bait and switch."

The ADA applies to businesses too. But the main thing is there are avenues that are open to you in work that are not in law schools exams. For example Iím dyslexic I type very slowly and misspell most everything, but at work I can use speech to text, proofreading or dictation that make me just as fast as anyone else (if not faster). But I canít use those in exam soft so I have to type and correct my spelling by hand (no spell check) which takes much longer.
*In clinical studies, Matthies was well tolerated, but women who are pregnant, nursing or might become pregnant should not take or handle Matthies due to a rare, but serious side effect called him having to make child support payments.

disabilitylaw

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Re: Psychiatric Disability Right in Law School
« Reply #5 on: September 25, 2009, 06:56:00 PM »
Why would someone with bipolar depression need extra time for tests and assignments? That's an emotional disability, not learning, like ADD or Dyslexia.

I can understand how a "breakdown" may impact the need for extra time on assignments on an as-needed basis, but I believe to request consistent additional time may be using the disability to your advantage when that disability does not require extra time.

It depends upon how the disability affects the specific individual. A person applying for accomodations needs to explain the connect between his/her disability and the need for the specific accomodation. A person cannot just say "I have depression, therefore I need time and a half" - but if a person can establish that for whatever reason the depression translates into a need for accomodated time, then the person is entitled to the accomodation.

disabilitylaw

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Re: Psychiatric Disability Right in Law School
« Reply #6 on: September 25, 2009, 07:14:46 PM »
What kind of psychiatric disabilities are you talking about?  I know that persons with documented (serious) learning disabilities can get extra (sometimes double) time on exams. Accommodations in law school are tricky though because there is no law that will ever make an employer give an associate extra time to finish a memo -- regardless of whether the associate has a learning disability. So I am a little cynical about the value of accommodations that could lull a person into spending lots of money on school and then being unable to actually work with the degree after graduation. It seems like a "bait and switch."

The ADA applies to businesses too. But the main thing is there are avenues that are open to you in work that are not in law schools exams. For example Iím dyslexic I type very slowly and misspell most everything, but at work I can use speech to text, proofreading or dictation that make me just as fast as anyone else (if not faster). But I canít use those in exam soft so I have to type and correct my spelling by hand (no spell check) which takes much longer.

Some schools allow students to use dictation software as an accomodation. The school I work at does.

jacy85

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Re: Psychiatric Disability Right in Law School
« Reply #7 on: September 25, 2009, 11:39:45 PM »
Why would someone with bipolar depression need extra time for tests and assignments? That's an emotional disability, not learning, like ADD or Dyslexia.

I can understand how a "breakdown" may impact the need for extra time on assignments on an as-needed basis, but I believe to request consistent additional time may be using the disability to your advantage when that disability does not require extra time.

It depends upon how the disability affects the specific individual. A person applying for accomodations needs to explain the connect between his/her disability and the need for the specific accomodation. A person cannot just say "I have depression, therefore I need time and a half" - but if a person can establish that for whatever reason the depression translates into a need for accomodated time, then the person is entitled to the accomodation.


Please explain the possible connect between an emotional disorder (as opposed to learning disorder) and the need for accommodations.  I'm having trouble even thinking of a plausible connection that would justify getting extra time on an exam.

scrobin

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Re: Psychiatric Disability Right in Law School
« Reply #8 on: September 28, 2009, 10:36:51 PM »
You all want to know, I'll tell you.  I have ADD and Bipolar II. I was diagnosed with ADD at 12 and Bipolar II at 19.  I know what you all are thinking.  Youíre thinking Iím stupid, unintelligent, insane, and incapable of leading a full life.  Guess again! I am smart and intelligent, and perfectly sane. I am a straight A student, who is a Phi Theta Kappa member.  I do the same work and take the same tests, as everyone else in my class.    I go to college full time.  Live on my own, and I am planning on getting an academic scholarship to a school I want to transfer to.  I plan to go into public interest law, doing civil rights and litigation work.  One of my areas will be disability rights, and I will make sure that one no disabled person has their rights denied, especially people with psychiatric disabilities. Nothing and no one will keep me from being an attorney.  If anyone tries to deny me my civil rights, I will sue the pants off of them. 

On a personal note, I can tell you that there is nothing worse than being sick, alone and scared and having people ridicule and stigmatize you for it.  No one deserves that type of treatment. 

I find it really sad that people in this day and age continue to stigmatize people with psychiatric disabilities and deny them their civil rights.  They think we're lazy, weak, insane, stupid, violent, etc.  However, people with psychiatric disabilities are just as capable and competent as anyone else.  They have an illness, just like any other.  Like asthma or diabetes.  To treat people with psychiatric disabilities this way, is the same as discriminating against someone because of their race, gender, and sexual orientation.  You wouldn't make fun of someone with cancer, you wouldn't deny someone with cancer disability accommodations if need be.  Then why do the same to someone with a psychiatric disability. 

I also find it really sad that people in this day and age, can't see people with psychiatric disabilities for the gifts and abilities they have. Abraham Lincoln suffered from depression.  He was a lawyer and the president of the United States.  If Lincoln were alive today, and he was a student and had depression, who you deny him his civil rights and a chance to succeed in school? If someone did, they would have never have known one of the greatest presidents who ever lived.

The rehabilitation act of 1973, section 504, grants student with psychiatric disabilities the right to their civil rights and academic accommodations.  However, higher education institutions continually ignore the laws regarding student with psychiatric disabilities and itís a disgrace.  Not to mention that suicide is the second leading cause of death among college students, and the age for most mental illnesses are in ones late teens and twenties.   Even with this information, higher education institutions still do nothing to address the problem.  Still colleges continue to do nothing about it.  Student insurance doesnít even cover mental health parity, and there is a lack of awareness on campus.  This is all a result of ignorance and bigotry. 

Itís time for people to get a clue about mental illnesses and stop the bigotry. >:(

elle-y

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Re: Psychiatric Disability Right in Law School
« Reply #9 on: September 29, 2009, 02:32:26 AM »
You all want to know, I'll tell you.  I have ADD and Bipolar II. I was diagnosed with ADD at 12 and Bipolar II at 19.  I know what you all are thinking.  Youíre thinking Iím stupid, unintelligent, insane, and incapable of leading a full life.  Guess again! I am smart and intelligent, and perfectly sane. I am a straight A student, who is a Phi Theta Kappa member.  I do the same work and take the same tests, as everyone else in my class.    I go to college full time.  Live on my own, and I am planning on getting an academic scholarship to a school I want to transfer to.  I plan to go into public interest law, doing civil rights and litigation work.  One of my areas will be disability rights, and I will make sure that one no disabled person has their rights denied, especially people with psychiatric disabilities. Nothing and no one will keep me from being an attorney.  If anyone tries to deny me my civil rights, I will sue the pants off of them. 

On a personal note, I can tell you that there is nothing worse than being sick, alone and scared and having people ridicule and stigmatize you for it.  No one deserves that type of treatment. 

I find it really sad that people in this day and age continue to stigmatize people with psychiatric disabilities and deny them their civil rights.  They think we're lazy, weak, insane, stupid, violent, etc.  However, people with psychiatric disabilities are just as capable and competent as anyone else.  They have an illness, just like any other.  Like asthma or diabetes.  To treat people with psychiatric disabilities this way, is the same as discriminating against someone because of their race, gender, and sexual orientation.  You wouldn't make fun of someone with cancer, you wouldn't deny someone with cancer disability accommodations if need be.  Then why do the same to someone with a psychiatric disability. 

I also find it really sad that people in this day and age, can't see people with psychiatric disabilities for the gifts and abilities they have. Abraham Lincoln suffered from depression.  He was a lawyer and the president of the United States.  If Lincoln were alive today, and he was a student and had depression, who you deny him his civil rights and a chance to succeed in school? If someone did, they would have never have known one of the greatest presidents who ever lived.

The rehabilitation act of 1973, section 504, grants student with psychiatric disabilities the right to their civil rights and academic accommodations.  However, higher education institutions continually ignore the laws regarding student with psychiatric disabilities and itís a disgrace.  Not to mention that suicide is the second leading cause of death among college students, and the age for most mental illnesses are in ones late teens and twenties.   Even with this information, higher education institutions still do nothing to address the problem.  Still colleges continue to do nothing about it.  Student insurance doesnít even cover mental health parity, and there is a lack of awareness on campus.  This is all a result of ignorance and bigotry. 

Itís time for people to get a clue about mental illnesses and stop the bigotry. >:(


breathe. in. out.

and then realize you're the only one creating a stigma here. also, you are not the only one here with bipolar and add. you cannot use it as a crutch. you want to live a life to your fullest capability? then don't give reason to doubt you. you must win your challenges on your own merits, not on your hinderances and what you "deserve".

That said, please consider the type of law you want to practice. Passion is one thing. Vengeance will not win you any cases...or clients.
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