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Looking to get into UBC law

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BD2002:
I'm new to this forum, but I'm trying to get a leg up on the competition.

Anything that will help me with getting into UBC law?

I know they count 50% GPA and 50% LSAT.

I'm a first year at SFU at the moment, and am going to major in philosophy.

Branden

!закон и право!:
The UBC admission statistics are as follows:


--- Quote ---What is the minimum GPA I require to apply to UBC Law? What about LSAT?

There is no specific minimum LSAT score or GPA that is required to apply. The higher the score, however, the more competitive your application will be.

Last year, successful applicants in the Regular Category had an average CGPA of 82% (approximately 3.8 on a 4.3 scale) with a LSAT score of 164. However, because we weigh the GPA and LSAT evenly there is a range including an LSAT score of 165 and a CGPA of 78% and an LSAT score of 155, but with a CGPA of 86%. The lowest competitive GPA would be 68% together with an LSAT in the 99 th percentile. Please note this applies to the Regular Category only.

--- End quote ---

You may also wish to research what self-proclaimed "strengths" that the UBC Law Faculty touts. Craft your Personal Statement to congrue with these strenghts.

UBC doesn't typically require references for "Regular" category applicants, and they make it abundantly clear that they will not read them if they are received.

As for gaining a "leg up" as you put it. There really isn't any way. Simply focus on getting the best GPA possible and score well on the LSAT.

All the best.

BD2002:
Well I was going to attempt to get references, but if they do not require or even consider them, I may focus less on that aspect.

Thank you.

!закон и право!:

--- Quote from: BD2002 on September 21, 2009, 10:44:05 AM ---Well I was going to attempt to get references, but if they do not require or even consider them, I may focus less on that aspect.

Thank you.

--- End quote ---

For those school that do require them, references don't matter particularily much anyway. They tend to make the case for borderline applicants.

An applicant with strong numbers (GPA and LSAT) will get into a Canadian law school. It's no mistake that UofT also doesn't consider reference letters.

Just don't make any painfully destructive grammatical/typographical errors on your Personal Statement and you're golden.

BD2002:
A personal statement is basically a "why I should be accepted into law school" essay?

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