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Author Topic: 2.9 and mid-160s LSAT scores. Family Law?  (Read 1388 times)

ChippewaFan87

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2.9 and mid-160s LSAT scores. Family Law?
« on: September 13, 2009, 04:36:06 PM »
So I have around a B average and I've been consistently between 160 and 166 for my practice exams (Princeton Review). I've been very involved in several extracurriculars throughout my undergrad and have already had one internship. I'm very interested in family law and would like to go to a school in the Boston, Chicago, or New York area because these are places I could see myself living. So far I have considered Hofstra, Rutgers-Newark, Suffolk, and DePaul among others. Any ideas on what I should do?

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Re: 2.9 and mid-160s LSAT scores. Family Law?
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2009, 05:02:29 PM »
So I have around a B average and I've been consistently between 160 and 166 for my practice exams (Princeton Review). I've been very involved in several extracurriculars throughout my undergrad and have already had one internship. I'm very interested in family law and would like to go to a school in the Boston, Chicago, or New York area because these are places I could see myself living. So far I have considered Hofstra, Rutgers-Newark, Suffolk, and DePaul among others. Any ideas on what I should do?

It's been said a thousand times before and you'll realize how true this is after you take the test - and even more after you go through a cycle: it's futile to ask where you should go until you actually get a real LSAT score.  160 and 166 are not even in the same ball park in terms of how they'll influence your cycle.  Even 164 to 166 will bring huge differences.  Second, people always assume that they'll score along a certain range until they get the real thing back.  So in sum, take the test and then revisit your situation.

ChippewaFan87

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Re: 2.9 and mid-160s LSAT scores. Family Law?
« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2009, 05:16:47 PM »
Just asking for hypotheticals. Sorry to catch you on bad day.

EricN

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Re: 2.9 and mid-160s LSAT scores. Family Law?
« Reply #3 on: September 15, 2009, 10:03:54 PM »
Unfortunately the choice is no response or a response telling you to come back when you've actually taken the test. We can get into a big discussion over where you'd end up, and I'd say if you score well enough on the LSAT your B average would almost not matter (or at least matter little since schools ogle over increasing their LSAT medians). But unfortunately it is kind of futile for us to discuss where you could end up when given a 6-point range on a test that has effectively a 30-point spread (anything below a 150 and you might as well cut your losses).
I'm sure there are tons of people on here who would be willing to help out once you establish a score, including myself with my limited understanding of the admissions process.

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Re: 2.9 and mid-160s LSAT scores. Family Law?
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2009, 10:07:08 PM »
Just asking for hypotheticals. Sorry to catch you on bad day.

Unfortunately the choice is no response or a response telling you to come back when you've actually taken the test. We can get into a big discussion over where you'd end up, and I'd say if you score well enough on the LSAT your B average would almost not matter (or at least matter little since schools ogle over increasing their LSAT medians). But unfortunately it is kind of futile for us to discuss where you could end up when given a 6-point range on a test that has effectively a 30-point spread (anything below a 150 and you might as well cut your losses).
I'm sure there are tons of people on here who would be willing to help out once you establish a score, including myself with my limited understanding of the admissions process.

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