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Author Topic: Military  (Read 9226 times)

haus

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Re: Military
« Reply #40 on: August 15, 2011, 11:35:02 PM »
And something like that would make sense, but there's a big difference between an extra community college certification and a JD. Time,cost,etc.  I see lots of retired people get jobs as walmart greeters, or excops go work at TSA, but JD seems like a huge investment for a 2nd career is all.

Many/most Military retires are likely expecting to work 20+ years. Why would a sane person put themselves in a position to spend those years working crud jobs, especially for those who have access to educational benefits that could cover most of the cost of a law degree?

lawyerintraining

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Re: Military
« Reply #41 on: August 16, 2011, 01:14:28 AM »
I guess it depends what age you retire at. 37 sure I can see that. 50.......just pick a noncrud job that you are already qualified for from 30years of civil service. In that time you had to master at least one MOS.

FalconJimmy

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Re: Military
« Reply #42 on: August 16, 2011, 11:19:34 AM »
I guess it depends what age you retire at. 37 sure I can see that. 50.......just pick a noncrud job that you are already qualified for from 30years of civil service. In that time you had to master at least one MOS.

When you are 50, you may feel differently.  Right now, I think most people can expect to change careers multiple times during their lifetime.  In the end, I've found that most people really guide their decisions by what they want to do.  They backfill the rationale later.

If you want to be an attorney, 50 is as good a time as any to do it.  You're probably going to be working until you're 70 at the rate things are going these days.  Especially given that the stock market hasn't really risen in a dozen years or so, those guys (myself included) who thought they were going to be 401(k) millionaires at age 55 are probably resigning themselves to the idea that they'll work a little longer.

Also, you'd be surprised how few military MOSes, AFSCs or rates correlate to some sort of civilian employment.

lawyerintraining

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Re: Military
« Reply #43 on: August 16, 2011, 12:13:07 PM »
I guess I can see that idea. Maybe that's why so many retired vets end up as cops(and not good ones either)

I'm a vet in lawschool too, I just only did the 1 tour plus guard option.

FalconJimmy

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Re: Military
« Reply #44 on: August 16, 2011, 03:32:52 PM »
I guess I can see that idea. Maybe that's why so many retired vets end up as cops(and not good ones either)

I'm a vet in lawschool too, I just only did the 1 tour plus guard option.

Although you probably already know this, I would advise staying in the guard and getting that retirmement.  62 seems like a long ways off right now, but when you hit it, you'll be glad to be collecting that pension.  It's pretty substantial.  I wish I'd stuck out 16 years in the guard after my 4 years active.  Ah well.  I was young.  62 is a long ways off when you're 22.

Thane Messinger

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Re: Military
« Reply #45 on: August 16, 2011, 04:56:00 PM »
I guess I can see that idea. Maybe that's why so many retired vets end up as cops(and not good ones either)

I'm a vet in lawschool too, I just only did the 1 tour plus guard option.

Although you probably already know this, I would advise staying in the guard and getting that retirmement.  62 seems like a long ways off right now, but when you hit it, you'll be glad to be collecting that pension.  It's pretty substantial.  I wish I'd stuck out 16 years in the guard after my 4 years active.  Ah well.  I was young.  62 is a long ways off when you're 22.


Absolutely right.  Think very, very, very, very carefully about your plans whether you stay, go, or just don't know which way to turn.  (And especially the last.)  A few good decisions provide a rock-solid foundation and open options.  Bad decisions do the opposite. 

wjo9522

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Re: Military
« Reply #46 on: August 19, 2011, 10:56:34 AM »
...Maybe that's why so many retired vets end up as cops(and not good ones either)...

That's a hasty generalization concerning vet-cops, but you are certainly entitled to your opinion.  I have served with several Guard Members both overseas and in garrison, and while a great number of them are overweight, lack proficiency in their skills, and are generally ancient per-grade as compared to the average soldier; I would never postulate that they don't make good soldiers.   

I like the OP's rationale for obtaining a J.D.  According to the World Bank Development Indicator (2009), the mean US life expectancy is now 79 years.  Can we seriously expect, that in today's political and financial climate, a government pension is a "sure thing"?  I don't count on it and neither should the OP.  He is making an investment in himself and he is a proven performer.  In this case, I don't think that making a bet on himself is a gamble.





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Thane Messinger

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Re: Military
« Reply #47 on: August 19, 2011, 06:24:55 PM »
I like the OP's rationale for obtaining a J.D.  According to the World Bank Development Indicator (2009), the mean US life expectancy is now 79 years.  Can we seriously expect, that in today's political and financial climate, a government pension is a "sure thing"?  I don't count on it and neither should the OP.  He is making an investment in himself and he is a proven performer.  In this case, I don't think that making a bet on himself is a gamble.


Quite right.  It's hard to look a decade ahead, but it's a lot easier to look a decade back and sigh. 

Part of our mission in life is to predict what it is we'll regret looking back, and do what we can to avoid that.  Since there are too many things we can do at any given point, perhaps the greater point is to decide in which area we will excel.   = :   )